education.vic.gov.au

Policy last updated

27 March 2024

Scope

  • Schools
  • School councils

Date:
February 2020

Policy

Policy

This policy provides information about how funding is allocated to schools through the Student Resource Package (SRP) for targeted initiatives.

Details

Funding for ‘targeted initiatives’ is one of 3 categories of funding provided for by the SRP.

The targeted initiatives component provides funding for programs with specific targeted criteria and/or defined life spans. The Guidance tab provides information about the following specific types of targeted initiative funding:

Schools are expected to use SRP funds for the purpose for which it was allocated.

For more general information on the SRP, please refer to the Student Resource Package – Overview page.

Contacts

Primary Welfare Officer
David Billimoria
Phone: 03 7022 1324

Senior Secondary Re-engagement
Deborah Maher
Phone: 03 7022 1905

Career Education Funding
Leela Darvall
Phone: 03 7022 1824

VET
Clare Sherman
Phone: 03 7022 0923

Doctors in Secondary schools
Karen Gray
Phone: 03 7022 0631

Swimming in Schools
Statewide Swimming Coordinator
Phone: 03 4334 0523
Email: school.swimming@education.vic.gov.au

Chaplaincy
David Billimoria
Phone: 03 7022 1324

For information on how Victorian government schools can implement chaplaincy services not funded through the National School Chaplaincy Program, refer to the department’s Chaplaincy Policy.

Professional Learning Communities (PLC)
Kate Brady
Phone: 03 7022 2707

Primary Mathematics and Science Specialists
Scott Ware
Phone: 03 7022 0453

Head Start
Email: head.start@education.vic.gov.au

Respectful Relationships
Email: respectful.relationships@education.vic.gov.au


Guidance

Guidance

Targeted initiatives include programs with specific targeting criteria and/or defined life spans.

This guidance contains the following chapters:

  • Primary Welfare (Reference 50)
  • Late Enrolment and Senior Secondary Re-engagement (Reference 53)
  • Doctors in Secondary Schools – School program lead funding (Reference 64)
  • Respectful Relationships (Reference 86)
  • Career Education Funding (Reference 91)
  • Swimming in School (Reference 115)
  • Head Start (Reference 116)
  • National Student Wellbeing Program (Reference 117)
  • Middle Years Literacy and Numeracy Support Initiative (Reference 118)
  • Student Excellence Program Funding (Reference 120)
  • VCE Revision Lectures (Reference 121)
  • Professional Learning Communities (PLC) Link Schools (Reference 122)
  • Primary Mathematics and Science Specialists Initiative (Reference 125)
  • Transition Funding (Rural) (Reference 126)
  • Jobs, Skills and Pathways Coordination (Reference 127)
  • Tutor Learning Initiative (Reference 129)
  • Mental Health in Primary Schools (Reference 130)
  • Mental Health in Specialist Schools (Reference 131)
  • Career Start – Transforming the First Years of the Teaching Career (Reference 132)
  • Secondary Sciences, Technologies and Mathematics (SSTM) Initiative (Reference 133)
  • Outside School Hours Care Establishment Grant Initiative (Reference 134)
  • Teach Today and Teach Tomorrow Programs (Reference 135)
  • Inclusion Outreach Coaching (IOC) Initiative (Reference 136)
  • School Mental Health Fund (Reference 139)
  • Casual Relief Teacher Travel Fund (Reference 141)
  • Active Schools (Reference 142)
  • Vocational Education and Training Delivered to School Students (Reference 143)
  • NDIS Navigators (Reference 146)
  • Specialist School Activity Boost (Reference 147)
  • Flexible work for school leaders initiative (Reference 151)
  • Hindi and Punjabi beacon schools (Reference 152)

Primary Welfare (Reference 50)

Primary Welfare (Reference 50)

The Primary Welfare Officer initiative is designed to enhance the capacity of schools to develop positive school cultures and to support students who are at risk of disengagement and not achieving their educational potential. The Primary Welfare Officer initiative extends work undertaken in government primary, P-12 and special schools with the greatest need in Victoria to promote a safe and supportive environment and enhance student outcomes.

Primary Welfare Officer allocations in the Student Resource Package (SRP) have been set for 2024. Schools do not have to apply for funding. Funding is provided to schools that have primary enrolments at the campus level. Funding is provided consistent with the 2011 Student Family Occupation density for the campus, equal to or greater than 0.4559.

Where a school’s campus enrolments increase additional per student funding will be provided. However, where enrolments decline no adjustment will be made. No adjustments are made for changes to the Student Family Occupation density.

From 2023, the Primary Welfare Officer program is transitioning to the Mental Health in Primary Schools (MHiPS) program. Schools will transition in line with the MHiPS implementation rollout schedule.

For schools that are transitioning MHiPS in 2024 or participated in the MHiPS pilot between 2020 and 2022, refer to Mental Health in Primary Schools (Reference 130) for funding allocations.

Eligibility

Schools with the following campus types are eligible for the Primary Welfare Funding at campus level:

  • Primary
  • Primary/Secondary Combined
  • Special
  • Language
  • Day Special
  • Disability
  • Special Development

Campuses of secondary schools are not eligible.

Camp/Outdoor schools are ineligible irrespective of their entity register classification.

Funding is calculated at the Indicative, Confirmed and Revised cycles. Funding is allocated through credit funding.

The following campuses are not funded for this allocation: Aurora School and Flying Fruit Fly Circus School.

Calculation

The Primary Welfare Officer funding model in the SRP from 2012 consists of base funding and per student funding with a cap on the total funding available at each campus. The formula is as follows:

Base + ([School campus SFO − State-wide SFO threshold] × Student rate × enrolments)

Primary, Primary/Secondary and Language schools are funded on Primary enrolments.

Special schools are funded on Total enrolments.

Rates – 2024

  • SFO threshold: 0.4559
  • Base: $20,452
  • Per student rate: $1,303.98
  • Total funding per campus cap: $97,555

Further information

  • Primary Welfare Officer InitiativeExternal Link – provides general information about the Primary Welfare Officer Initiative
  • Student Engagement policy – provides advice, resources and strategies for schools on developing a Student Engagement Policy, promoting positive student behaviour, and responding to challenging behaviour. It provides resources that schools can access to support and improve student engagement

Late Enrolment and Senior Secondary Re-engagement (Reference 53)

Late Enrolment and Senior Secondary Re-engagement (Reference 53)

Late Enrolment and Senior Secondary Re-engagement Funding

Late Enrolment Funding is available to support young people experiencing vulnerability re-engaging in education following the February census. The Senior Secondary Re-engagement Funding aims to target senior secondary students re-engaging into education via contracted provision of the VCE Vocational Major or VPC.

If a young person is eligible, funds will be allocated directly to the school where the young person is enrolled, paid pro-rate from the date of the young person’s enrolment.

Payments

The Late Enrolment and Senior Secondary Re-engagement Program provides targeted funding through the Student Resource Package (SRP) to schools for individual young people who enrol after the February census is completed and who meet the eligibility criteria.

Application deadlines

Applications open on Monday 22 April 2024 and close on Friday 17 May 2024.

Schools will be allocated their payment from the first round of funding as part of the revised SRP in June 2024.

Individual rate

The 2024 individual rate is a targeted payment of $10,000, which will be paid out pro-rata (100% or 75%) based on the enrolment date of the young person. There will be additional funding of $2,000 available to schools on top of the Late Enrolment Funding payment if they enrol a young person who has been involved in youth justice – either in custody or appearing before the Children’s Courts, in recognition of the often more personalised approach required to ensure ongoing engagement in education for this cohort.

Funding will be paid pro-rata based on the date of enrolment:

Funding will be paid pro-rata based on the date of enrolment
Enrolment periodProportion of amountTargeted paymentPayment with additional youth justice facility loading
Between Thursday 29 February and Friday 24 May 2024100% of full-time SRP$10,000$12,000
Between Monday 27 May and Friday 9 August 202475% of full-time SRP$7,500$9,500

Eligibility criteria

For schools to apply for Late Enrolment Funding, the young person must be re-engaging with education after the February census and meet the following criteria:

  • not been counted (funded) in a Department of Education school census in the same year and must meet at least one of the following criteria:
    • disengaged from school (defined as less than 30% attendance)
    • residing in statutory Out of Home Care (defined as young people who cannot live in their family home and are residing in a temporary, medium or long-term living arrangement)
    • involved with the youth justice system, including a young person with a youth control order and intensive bail conditions (identified by Education Justice Initiative staff, Parkville College staff or court liaison officers)
  • have a confirmed school enrolment (or equivalent) at a government school with an Individual Education Plan (IEP) in place (please note there is no age limit for applications)
  • not have received Late Enrolment Funding within the current financial year
  • not be participating in an approved senior or foundational secondary re-engagement program.

For schools to be eligible for Senior Secondary Re-engagement Funding, the following criteria must be met:

  • the young person must be re-engaging with education after the February census
  • the young person must not have been counted (funded) in a Department of Education school census in the same year
  • the young person must be participating in an approved senior secondary re-engagement program with an IEP in place.

Applying for funding

Once a young person is identified as eligible for funding:

Step 1

The school develops an IEP for the young person. An IEP is required for both Late Enrolment Funding and Senior Secondary Re-engagement Funding applications. Schools must use the IEP template developed by the department which is available at Individual Education Plans – Resources.

It is required that school staff take the following steps when developing an IEP:

  1. Utilise the department’s IEP template.
  2. Complete the IEP eLearning module on LearnED (available via eduPayExternal Link ) and attend an IEP webinar (available via Arc – Individual Education PlanningExternal Link ).
  3. Schedule a Student Support Groups (SSG) meeting with the student (where appropriate), their parent/carer, teacher and education support staff. The SSG is an opportunity to get to know the student and how they learn. The meeting will assist school staff in understanding the student’s strengths and interests and any challenges or barriers to learning and will assist in developing student-centred approaches.
  4. After the IEP has been developed, use the IEP quality checklist rubric (PDF)External Link to check that it includes the essential components.

Step 2

The school completes the online application formExternal Link (staff login required) and attaches the completed IEP.

Step 3

The application is initially sent to the Performance and Evaluation Division to determine whether the young person was funded during the February census. If a young person was not funded, the application will then go through a series of approvals. If the young person was funded, the principal will be notified immediately, and the application will be deemed ineligible.

Step 4

Schools will receive advice via email confirming the application's approval and the direct payment of approved funds to the school which takes place via the SRP update.

For further information on VET delivered to secondary school students refer to: Vocational Education and Training Delivered to Secondary School Students.

Contacts

Schools should contact the Manager of Youth Pathways and Transition in their region to discuss applications and determine time frames to ensure the timely submission of applications.

If you require further information, please email: youth.participation@education.vic.gov.au


Doctors in Secondary Schools – School program lead funding (Reference 64)

Doctors in Secondary Schools – School program lead funding (Reference 64)

The Doctors in Secondary Schools Program (DiSS)External Link funds general practitioners (GPs) and practice nurses to attend 100 Victorian government secondary schools up to one day a week to provide medical advice and health care to those students most in need.

School program lead funding

Schools will be required to appoint a Leading Teacher to hold overall responsibility for program coordination duties for the school.

Schools will be provided with the funding equivalent to 0.2 FTE at Leading Teacher Level 3.1 pay rate to support this for the school year.

The responsibility for coordination of the program within the school can also rest with an Assistant Principal, if that is more appropriate than a Leading Teacher. However, if a school appoints an Assistant Principal to the School Program Lead role, the school will still receive the same amount of funding as if a Leading Teacher were appointed.

Eligibility

Schools with the following campus types are eligible for DiSS Funding at school level.

  • Secondary
  • Primary/Secondary Combined

The 2 schools below schools are also eligible for this funding:

  • Croydon Community School
  • Oakwood School

Funding is calculated at the Indicative budget cycle, through credit funding.

Calculation

Funding = Leading Teacher Level 3.1 × 0.2 FTE

*Student Resource Package (SRP) Indexation has been applied to the rate annually since commencement, noting payroll tax and superannuation has also been applied to the allocation.

Responsibilities of the school program lead

The Doctors in Secondary Schools Program Lead is responsible for providing leadership in the school around the implementation of the program, and plays a crucial role in leading the partnership between the health and education sectors as part of the DiSS program. This includes:

  • support the GP to deliver youth-friendly primary health care to the student population
  • collaborate with the practice nurse to ensure effective management of the service, including appointment systems
  • integrate the GP service into the broader health and wellbeing offering of the school
  • provide leadership around parent/ carer/ broader school community involvement in the Doctors in Secondary Schools program
  • supporting the programs strategic planning to ensure a high-quality service that is trusted, fully utilised and youth friendly
  • promoting the service to the students and the broader school community and linking the clinical team with other members of school staff
  • ensure compliance to relevant privacy legislation and provide a child safe environment in accordance with the Child Safe Standards
  • build a positive relationship with the local GP practice and facilitate partnerships with community health providers for the benefit of the student population

Further information


Respectful Relationships (Reference 86)

Respectful Relationships (Reference 86)

Respectful Relationships is being implemented across the state through a lead and partner school model.

Funding for this initiative is allocated through the SRP and should be recorded in CASES21 as follows:

  • Schools are encouraged to use the CASES21 sub-program code for their Respectful Relationships transactions.
  • Lead schools CASES21 Respectful Relationships sub-program code is 5215.
  • Partner schools CASES21 Respectful Relationships sub-program code is 5216.

Eligibility

Schools with the following school types are eligible for Respectful Relationships funding at school level:

  • Primary
  • Secondary
  • Primary/Secondary Combined
  • Specialist
  • Language.

Funding may be calculated at the Indicative, Confirmed and Revised cycles. Funding is allocated through cash funding.

Funding allocation

Funding for partner schools

New schools opening in 2024 will receive $4,000 to:

  • support the implementation of the whole school approach to Respectful Relationships as a partner school
  • participate in your local lead and partner school cluster
  • participate in Respectful Relationships professional learning.

More information


Career Education Funding (Reference 91)

Career Education Funding (Reference 91)

Career Education Funding (CEF) supports schools to provide career education activities for all students in Years 7 to 12.

CEF accountability and reporting requirements are available at Career Education Funding – Accountability and Reporting Requirements.

Funding and eligibility

Eligible school or campus types:

  • Secondary
  • Primary/Secondary combined
  • Special
  • Special Development
  • Language

Hospital, deaf and miscellaneous campuses are not eligible for CEF funding except for Virtual School Victoria and Victorian College of the Deaf. Camp/outdoor schools are ineligible irrespective of their entity register classification. Aurora School, Yarra Me School, Centre for Higher Education Studies and the Netschool Campus of Bendigo Senior Secondary College are not eligible. Funding is calculated at the Indicative, Confirmed and Revised cycles. Funding is allocated through cash funding.

For Years 7 to 9

CEF funding is based on enrolments of students in Years 7 to 9 in Victorian government secondary school settings and students aged 12 to 14 years in Victorian government specialist schools and English Language settings.

For Years 10 to 12

CEF funding is based on the enrolments of students aged 15 years and over in Victorian government specialist schools and English Language settings and Years 10 to 12 in all other Victorian government secondary schools, and the school's Student Family Occupation (SFO) density.

Additional funding is provided to schools with SFO densities greater than a threshold value to support young people at risk of disengaging or not making a successful transition to further education, training or secure employment.

Calculation

For Years 7 to 9

CEF allocation = CEF enrolments × Base per student rate

Note: If a school's CEF allocation is less than the Minimum allocation (as identified in 'Rates' below), the school will receive the Minimum allocation. The Minimum allocation is set based on enrolment levels.

For Years 10 to 12

CEF allocation = Base allocation + At risk allocation

Note: If a school's CEF allocation is less than the Minimum allocations (as identified in 'Rates' below), the school will receive the Minimum allocation. The Minimum allocation is set based on enrolment levels.

Base allocation = CEF enrolments × Base per student rate

At risk allocation (only if the schools SFO index is greater than the SFO threshold – see 'Rates' below) = CEF enrolments × ([School SFO index] − [SFO threshold]) / (1 − [SFO threshold]) × At risk allocation per student rate.

Rates – 2024

For Year 7

  • Base per student rate: $22 per CEF enrolment
  • Minimum allocation: $250

For Year 8

  • Base per student rate: $28 per CEF enrolment
  • Minimum allocation: $250

For Year 9

  • Base per student rate: $51.50 per CEF enrolment
  • Minimum allocation: $500

Years 10 to 12 – per student rates

  • Base per student rate: $70 per CEF enrolment
  • At risk allocation per student rate: $559 per CEF enrolment
  • SFO threshold: 0.4090

Years 10 to 12 – minimum allocations

  • Less than 30 CEF enrolments: $208 per CEF enrolment
  • 30 to 99.9 CEF enrolments: $6,000 in total
  • Greater than or equal to 100 CEF enrolment: $10,000 in total

Swimming in Schools (Reference 115)

Swimming in Schools (Reference 115)

The Swimming in Schools initiativeExternal Link is designed to increase opportunities for students to learn how to swim, and ensure they develop lifelong skills in swimming and water safety.

Swimming and water safety education is embedded across all bands of the Victorian Curriculum (F-10). By the end of Year 6, it is anticipated that students are able to demonstrate the skills and knowledge in the Victorian Water Safety Certificate (VWSC). Schools can seek the assistance of swimming providers to provide swimming and water safety programs, to assess the competencies of their students and to award VWSC through the VWSC portal.

The Swimming in Schools initiative provides funding for the delivery of swimming and water safety programs.

Funding will be distributed through the Student Resource Package.

Eligibility

Schools with the following campus types are eligible to receive Swimming in Schools funding at school level:

  • Primary
  • Primary/Secondary Combined
  • Special
  • Day Special
  • Deaf (excluding deaf campuses of mainstream schools)
  • Disability
  • Special Development
  • English Language

Funding is calculated at the Indicative, Confirmed and Revised cycles; funding is provided through cash funding.

Funding allocation

Primary and Primary/Secondary Schools

Funding is allocated based on the number of Year 6 enrolments.

Schools are to use the funding to support program provision at any year level.

Specialist schools and English Language schools

Funding is allocated based on the number of enrolments.

Schools are to use the funding to support program provision at any year level.

Rates

Metropolitan Victorian government schools – Cash ($) Allocation

  • Per Year 6 student – Primary and Primary-Secondary combined Schools – $235
  • Per Specialist School student – $235
  • Per English Language School student – $235

Regional Victorian government schools – Cash ($) Allocation

  • Per Year 6 student – Primary and Primary-Secondary combined Schools – $270
  • Per Specialist School student – $270
  • Per English Language School student – $270

2024 top-up

An offline payment has been made to eligible schools for 2024 only, as a one-off Swimming in Schools funding top-up is being provided to:

  • very small schools who have less than 10 year 6 students
  • new schools whose year 6 numbers are less than one-seventh of their school population.

The top-up funding has been allocated in line with the ‘Rates’ section above, however it is not part of the 2024 Indicative allocation released to schools at the end of Term 3, 2023. Refer to the advice on Term 1 2024 quarterly cash grants for the top up allocation.

Reporting in CASES21

Schools must record their expenditure and student attendance information for swimming and water-safety programs in CASES21.

  • The attendance code is 620: Swimming and Water Safety Program
  • The financial code is 4209: Swimming in Schools

Contact: school.swimming@education.vic.gov.au


Head Start (Reference 116)

Head Start (Reference 116)

Head StartExternal Link is an apprenticeship and traineeship pathway for secondary students. Head Start students are encouraged to spend more time doing important, paid, on-the-job training while completing their senior secondary certificate.

Eligibility

Schools with the following campus types are eligible for Head Start funding at a school level:

  • Secondary
  • Primary/Secondary Combined

Funding is calculated at the Indicative, Confirmed and Revised cycles. Funding is allocated through credit funding.

Funding allocation

SRP credit funding will be provided to participating schools that host Head Start staff.

Funding will cover salary and will be allocated based on salary rates and time fractions of Head Start staff employed in each cluster.

Operational costs

Operational costs will be funded through the Schools targeted funding governance portalExternal Link (Education account required).

Note: Arrangements have been made so mileage can be processed in eduPay and charged directly to the program area. For more information, contact head.start@education.vic.gov.au


National Student Wellbeing Program (Reference 117)

National Student Wellbeing Program (Reference 117)

The National Student Wellbeing Program (NSWP) is an Australian Government program.

The NSWP provides:

  • pastoral care services
  • strategies that support the wellbeing of the broader school community.

From 1 January 2023, all Victorian schools participating in the NSWP can:

  • contract a chaplain or student wellbeing officer through a NSWP provider
  • employ a student wellbeing officer as an education support staff member.

Eligibility

Schools with the following campus types are eligible for NSWP funding at a campus level:

  • Primary
  • Secondary
  • Primary/Secondary combined
  • Special
  • Day Special
  • Special Development
  • Community

Funding may be calculated at the Indicative, Confirmed and Revised cycles. Funding is allocated through cash funding.

Funding rates

Eligible school campuses receive funding of $20,280 per year or $24,336 for schools in remote/very remote areas.

Contact


Middle Years Literacy and Numeracy Support initiative (Reference 118)

Middle Years Literacy and Numeracy Support initiative (Reference 118)

The Middle Years Literacy and Numeracy Support (MYLNS) initiative provides funding to government schools to release teachers to provide direct teaching support to students in Year 10 who are at risk of finishing school without the literacy and numeracy skills they need for future work.

Eligibility

MYLNS funding is provided to all Victorian government schools with Year 10 students except for selective entry, camp, language and specialist schools.

Funding

Schools do not have to apply for MYLNS funding, as funding is determined using NAPLAN data.

MYLNS funding will be provided directly to schools through the Student Resource Package (SRP), as a 90% credit, 10% cash allocation.

All government schools with Year 10 students receive a minimum of 0.4 FTE time release funding ($50,283) as they are eligible for the equivalent of 0.2 FTE for literacy direct support, and 0.2 FTE for numeracy direct support.

Table 1 below outlines the MYLNS funding brackets, associated teacher time release, and number of eligible students (funding amounts are expressed as an FTE time release and funded at Classroom Teacher 2.5 level).

Table 1: MYLNS funding and associated support
Amount shown in SRPAssociated Full time equivalent (FTE) time releaseAssociated number of eligible students in literacy and numeracy
N/A0.20 to 15
$50,283.800.416 to 30
$75,424.200.631 to 45
$100,565.600.846 to 60
$125,7071.061 to 75
$150,848.401.276 to 90
$175,989.801.491 to 105
$201,131.201.6106 to 120
$226,272.601.8121 to 135
$251,4142136 to 150
$276,555.402.2151 to 165
$301,696.802.4166 to 180

Schools with Flexible Learning Option (FLO) campuses or programs are provided with additional funding (0.2 FTE) per FLO campus/program to increase the support available to students with high levels of need. FLO funding allocations are reflected within the amount shown in the SRP.

Schools with Year 10 students but no Year 9 students (that is, Senior Secondary Schools) received an Indicative funding allocation based on their Confirmed 2023 MYLNS allocation. These figures have been adjusted in the Confirmed 2024 SRP based on the enrolled students.

Funding is not re-allocated between schools if students transfer in or out during the school year.

Schools should utilise any unspent 2023 MYLNS funding to include more Year 10 students in the MYLNS initiative and/or continue providing differentiated, needs-based support to students who need it most across all year levels.

Accountability

Funding is provided to release teachers to provide direct teaching support to prioritised students in Year 10. Schools must only use their MYLNS funding for the provision of the MYLNS initiative.

Schools are required to:

  • provide intensive learning support to MYLNS students, as per the department’s policy on the Middle Years Literacy and Numeracy Support initiative
  • review the MYLNS students pre-identified in CASES21 and update/amend as required
  • nominate MYLNS Improvement Teachers and update their details as required
  • maintain records of student learning.

More information

For further information, refer to the department’s policy on the Middle Years Literacy and Numeracy Support initiative or contact MYLNS@education.vic.gov.au


Student Excellence Program Funding (Reference 120)

Student Excellence Program Funding (Reference 120)

The Student Excellence Program (SEP) funding supports schools to implement the Student Excellence Program.

The SEP includes:

  • structured learning extension programs for high-ability students
  • professional learning for classroom teachers to better support their high-ability students
  • more resources for government schools to build their programs for high-ability students.

Schools can decide how to use the funding allocation to best meet the needs of their high-ability students – where relevant, schools can pool funds, for example in collaborative delivery of masterclasses. Many schools are already running programs for high-ability students, and this funding can be used to support these programs.

Eligibility

Schools do not have to apply for funding. All eligible schools will receive a SEP funding allocation through the Student Resource Package (SRP) to support the implementation of the initiative in their school. Eligible school types include:

  • Primary
  • Secondary
  • Primary/Secondary combined
  • Special schools (by request only)*

School types and specific schools that are not eligible for SEP funding include:

  • English language schools
  • camp/outdoor schools
  • selective entry high schools
  • John Monash Science School
  • Victoria College of the Arts Secondary School
  • The Victorian School of Languages
  • The Centre for Higher Education Studies.

*Special schools are eligible however will not automatically receive funding. Special schools can submit a request to the Student Excellence Unit for consideration to support their identified high ability student cohort.

Funding is calculated at the Indicative, Confirmed and Revised cycles. Funding is allocated through credit and cash funding.

Funding

SEP funding is allocated based on the number of student enrolments in Victorian government primary and secondary schools.

Schools will receive a per school allocation related to their cohort size categorisation.

Use of SEP funding

Schools will make local decisions as to how the SEP funding allocation will be used to best meet the needs of their high-ability students. For example, the funding may be used for:

  • appointment of a High-Ability Practice Leader to support Student Excellence Program initiatives
  • attending high ability professional learning activities including the use of Casual Relief Teachers
  • delivery of masterclasses for students in the Victorian High-Ability Program
  • participation in Victorian Challenge and Enrichment SeriesExternal Link activities/events
  • other programs for high-ability students
  • student transport costs to access extension program events
  • co-ordination time for high-ability programs
  • parent information evenings
  • guest speakers for high-ability students
  • classroom resources for extension activities.
Per school allocation – 2024
School cohort (as per student enrolments)Per school cash allocation
1 to 39$1,795
40 to 79$1,845
80 to 99$2,320
100 to 149$3,265
150 to 199$4,495
200 to 249$5,815
250 to 299$7,190
300 to 399$9,115
400 to 499$11,665
500 to 699$15,505
700 to 899$20,505
900 to 1199$27,080
1200 to 1499$34,790
1500 +$40,690

Targeted SEP funding operates within a capped budget. This means that cohort allocations may be adjusted up or down depending on both changes in total enrolments from all schools and the spread of these enrolments across cohorts.

Accountability

Schools are responsible for using the funds within the guidelines provided by the department – refer to the Resources tab.

Schools must code any expenditure of SEP funding to the sub-program code 8502 in CASES21.

Where a school uses SEP funding to either employ a high-ability practice leader, make a special payment or support the release of a teacher, this expense will be managed through eduPay and will not appear in the CASES21 ledger.

More information


VCE Revision Lectures (Reference 121)

VCE Revision Lectures (Reference 121)

The VCE Revision Lectures initiative recognises that rural and regional students face unique barriers in attending VCE revision lectures due to additional travel and accommodation costs.

Targeted funding is available to support rural and regional students from government schools to access VCE revision lectures and other exam revision supports across Victoria.

Accountability

Schools are responsible for using the funding as per the School implementation guidelines (PDF)External Link (staff login required) provided by the department.

Schools have discretion in allocating the funding for VCE revision lectures and related supports for senior VCE students.

To account for how the funding is spent, schools are required to complete an annual survey. Schools will be notified to complete the survey at the end of each calendar year.

Eligibility

Funding for VCE revision support is only available to rural and regional government schools with senior secondary graded enrolments (Year 11 and Year 12). Eligibility is determined using data from the February School Census.

The VCE Revision Lectures initiative defines rural and regional government schools as those in Local Government Areas (LGAs) outside of the metropolitan LGAs.

Rural and regional LGAs are aligned with the following department Areas: Mallee, Loddon Campaspe, Central Highlands, Wimmera South-West, Barwon, Ovens Murray, Goulburn, Inner Gippsland and Outer Gippsland.

Secondary and primary/secondary combined schools in these areas are eligible for funding.

How funding is calculated

Schools do not have to apply for funding.

Funding is calculated as part of the SRP and allocated through cash funding.

The funding is calculated using the number of Year 11 and 12 student enrolments, base student rate and location indexed funding.

The funding formula assumes that 15% of Year 11 students and 30% of Year 12 students will access VCE revision supports.

The base student rate may differ from year to year.

Location indexed funding means that schools furthest from Melbourne and other major centres receive a higher subsidy.

Rates – 2023

[(15% × Year 11 enrolments) × $160] + [(30% × Year 12 enrolments) × $815] + [Location index base $687.92 + (Location index × Senior secondary enrolments × Location index per student rate $108.87)]

Further information

For more information about the initiative contact rural.regional.reform@education.vic.gov.au


Professional Learning Communities (PLC) Link Schools are funded to lead cross school collaboration activities to support the system-wide spreading of effective and impactful PLC practices in Victorian government schools.

Eligibility

There are 51 PLC Link Schools in 2024. These schools are distributed across the state and include a combination of primary, secondary, P-12 and specialist schools.

Schools are selected to be invited to participate in the initiative through consultation with regional offices.

Funding

PLC Link Schools each receive $75,000 for the school year.

Funding is provided as cash via the SRP. Cash is provided to enable flexibility in how funding is utilised. Funding can be converted to credit as per the established process if the school wished to support time release of a PLC Link Leader.

Accountability

Schools are required to acquit the use of funds to the department via:

  • completing a PLC Link School Implementation Plan and submitting during Term 1, 2023
  • monitoring completion of activities in the Plan each semester
  • recording all PLC Link School cash expenditure against a school defined CASES21 sub-program code in the 7050 to 7056 range. Please title the nominated code 'PLC Link Schools'.

The PLC Link Handbook provides guidance on schools’ responsibilities to acquit SRP funding. PLC Link Schools are provided a copy of the handbook upon appointment.

More information

For queries regarding PLC Link Schools, please email: professional.learning.communities@education.vic.gov.au


Primary Mathematics and Science Specialists Initiative (Reference 125)

Primary Mathematics and Science Specialists Initiative (Reference 125)

As part of the 2022–23 Victorian State Budget, the government provided $17.1 million for the Primary Mathematics and Science Specialists (PMSS) initiative. PMSS is a 2 year program designed to drive whole school change through, generally 2, teachers from a primary school training to become specialists in either science or mathematics.

The program provides high quality face to face and online professional learning across the 2 years, including:

  • development of the individual specialists’ learning and knowledge about the important and key concepts and pedagogies in mathematics/science learning
  • development of others – working with teachers at the school level to further develop their practice
  • development of whole school level improvements.

Eligibility

Each cohort of PMSS is subject to State Budget funding.

Schools are selected to be invited to participate in the initiative through school level data and consultation with regional executives.

All schools identified to be invited to participate are formally approved by the Minister for Education.

Schools for Cohort 7 of this initiative have already undertaken a selection process.

Schools must remain active in the professional learning and evaluation programs and allocate funds as set out in the Letter of Agreement.

Funding

Schools that are invited to participate in PMSS are provided funding via the Student Resource Package (SRP) to release each participating teacher 0.5 FTE for the 2 years to support their roles as specialists. Funding is calculated at the Confirmed and Revised budget cycles and provided through credit funding.

Calculation

Allocation = number of participating teachers × 0.5 × level 2‐6 salary + school on‐costs

That is $66,339.50 per year for each participating teacher.

Further information

Contact: pmss@education.vic.gov.au


Transition Funding (Rural) (Reference 126)

Transition Funding (Rural) (Reference 126)

Transition Funding (Rural) is intended to provide time-limited support to schools most affected by changes to Rural School Size Adjustment Factor (RSAF), Location Index Funding (LIF) and Country Area Program grant (CAP) eligibility as a result of updated geographic boundaries.

Funding and Eligibility

Schools are eligible to receive Transition Funding (Rural) if they meet all the following eligibility criteria:

  • face a reduction in funding of greater than $25,000 in 2021 as a result of changes to RSAF, LIF and CAP eligibility from the use of updated geographic boundaries
  • their 2021 Student Resource Package (SRP) allocation is less than their 2020 SRP allocation.

Calculation and formula

Allocation = 2020 SRP (campus level) allocation − 2021 SRP (campus level) allocation

Note: The Transition Funding (Rural) allocation for a school campus has a maximum defined by:

  • the funding reduction in 2021 as a result of changes to RSAF, LIF and CAP eligibility from the use of updated geographic boundaries.

Eligible School Types

As per eligibility for:

  • Rural School Size Adjustment Factor (RSAF),
  • Location Index Funding (LIF) and
  • Country Area Program grant (CAP)

Funding will be based on the 2021 transitioning position of the eligible school, funding is allocated through a mix of credit and cash funding.

Funding for transition is time limited and will reduce annually. The below outlines the transition funding reduction over the transition period, in 2022 Schools transition funding will represent 75% of the previous year transition:

  • 2021 Transition Funding allocated – 100%
  • 2022 Transition Funding allocated – 75%
  • 2023 Transition Funding allocated – 50%
  • 2024 Transition Funding allocated – 25%
  • 2025 Transition Funding allocated – 0%

Example: Transition Funding (Rural) for a school is calculated as follows.

A school with numbers in the table below satisfies the eligibility conditions.

SRP Item Amount ($) Formula reference (refer to Formula reference below for explanation)
2020 Total SRP less rural items 1,300,000 A
2020 Rural items no longer eligible (RSAF/LIF/CAP) 200,000 B
2020 Total SRP 2020 1,500,000 C
2021 Indicative Total SRP before Transition 2021 1,200,000 D
2021 Indicative 2020 SRP − 2021 SRP (w/o transition) 300,000 E
2021 Indicative Transition amount 200,000 F
2021 Indicative Total 2021 SRP with new transition 1,400,000 N/A
2021 Transition amount 2021 (100%) 200,000 Transition Funding reduces over 5 years
2022 Transition Amt 2022 (75%) 150,000 Transition Funding reduces over 5 years
2023 Transition Amt 2023 (50%) 100,000 Transition Funding reduces over 5 years
2024 Transition Amt 2024 (25%) 50,000 Transition Funding reduces over 5 years
2025 Transition Amt 2025 (0%) - Transition Funding reduces over 5 years

Formula reference:

  • A = [ 2020 SRP of the school ] − [ 2020 funding under rural items (RSAF, LIF and CAP) for which the school is no longer eligible ]
  • B = 2020 funding under rural items (RSAF, LIF and CAP) for which the school is no longer eligible
  • C = 2020 Revised Total SRP
  • D = 2021 Indicative SRP without the rurality transition funding
  • E = C − D (2020 SRP − 2021 SRP)
  • F = Min (B,E) (Transition = 2020 SRP − 2021 SRP but capped at the loss of Rural Items).

Jobs, Skills and Pathways Coordination (Reference 127)

Jobs, Skills and Pathways Coordination (Reference 127)

Jobs, Skills and Pathways Coordination program funding assists schools with the coordination and delivery of vocational and applied learning programs, in particular, with Vocational Education and Training Delivered to School Students (VDSS), work-related learning, and the VCE Vocational Major and Victorian Pathways Certificate.

The key objectives of Jobs, Skills and Pathways Coordination funding are to:

  • support schools with the administrative burden of delivering vocational and applied learning and
  • provide schools with additional support in coordinating the delivery of high-quality vocational and applied learning pathways.

For further information, refer to the department’s policy on Jobs, Skills and Pathways Coordination.

Eligibility

In 2023 and 2024, the following schools are eligible to receive funding for Jobs, Skills and Pathways Coordination funding:

  • any mainstream government schools with a senior secondary program (that is, with at least one student enrolment in a senior secondary certificate), and
  • any specialist schools with at least one senior secondary-aged student (that is, aged 15 years or above at the time of eligibility determination).

Please note:

  • English Language schools are not eligible
  • schools with multiple campuses are only paid once (to the administration or senior campus)
  • eligibility of all Victorian government schools will automatically be reviewed each year for the following funded year using provisional data; schools do not need to request an eligibility review for this funding.

Calculation

Each eligible school will receive a flat amount equivalent to 0.3 FTE of an Education Support Staff salary at Level 1, Range 4-6, including superannuation and payroll tax. Funding is calculated at the Confirmed Cycle and is allocated through SRP cash funding on a termly basis.

Rate

2024 Indicative amount per annum per school = 0.3 of $125,394.54 = $37,618.36.

2024 Indicative amount per school per term = 0.25 of $37,618.36 = $9,404.59.

Further information

The funding is currently available for 2023 and 2024 only.

Further information about the functions that this funding can be used for and some examples of how the funding can be used are available at Jobs, Skills and Pathways Coordination.

To record expenditure against this funding, schools should activate a CASES21 code within the 8950-8999 range (Vocational Ed and Training) and add the title ‘JSP Coordination’.

Please note: when using the Jobs, Skills and Pathways Coordination funding to fund the employment of new staff in one or multiple schools, consideration must be made on the employment conditions of fixed-term and ongoing staff, and the implications for the school(s) with funding only given to the role for 1 or 2 years.

Contact information

Contact the Senior Secondary Pathways Reform Taskforce at pathways.reform@education.vic.gov.au


Tutor Learning Initiative (Reference 129)

Tutor Learning Initiative (Reference 129)

The Tutor Learning Initiative (TLI) provides funding for schools to employ tutors to provide small group learning support to students identified as needing additional support in literacy and numeracy. For further information on the TLI, refer to the department's policy on the Tutor Learning Initiative.

Eligibility

The following school types are eligible for TLI funding:

  • Primary
  • Secondary
  • Primary/Secondary
  • Specialist
  • Language.

The following schools are not eligible for TLI funding:

  • camp schools, irrespective of their listed school type (that is, 'Camp' school types, Somers School Camp, Outdoor School, Rubicon Outdoor School)
  • Victorian School of Languages
  • Parkville College
  • Centre for Higher Education Studies
  • Monash Children’s Hospital School
  • selective entry high schools (that is, John Monash Science School, MacRobertson Girls High School, Melbourne High School, Nossal High School, Suzanne Cory High School).

Funding

Funding will be provided directly to schools as a specific purpose payment through a credit allocation in their Student Resource Package (SRP). Enrolment data collected during the February 2024 census was used to update the TLI allocation to schools in the 2024 Confirmed SRP.

Schools must only use their TLI funding for the provision of the TLI, which is to employ tutors to provide targeted small group instruction to students identified as needing additional support in literacy and numeracy.

This funding includes tutor on-costs for superannuation and payroll tax. When hiring staff, it is important to factor in these on-costs as they are not separately itemised within the budget. Schools can choose to use additional funds, for example through Equity Social Disadvantage, to expand delivery of the TLI program within the school.

Calculation

Primary, secondary, and primary-secondary schools

Primary, secondary and primary-secondary schools are funded based on the number of students requiring additional learning support in literacy and numeracy, where the per student rate is equivalent to the cost of delivering a standard tutor learning program (3 sessions of 45 minutes per week, for groups of 5 students), for 20 weeks) by a Classroom Teacher 2-3 as according to the Victorian Government Schools Agreement.

The minimum funding allocation is set at $26,500 per annum for primary schools and $30,000 per annum for secondary schools, funding approximately 0.2 FTE, ensuring schools have sufficient funding to deliver at least 4 groups of small-group intervention, 2 each for reading and numeracy.

Per student rates

Primary (Prep to Year 6 including primary ungraded) per funded student rate: $1,247.32.

Secondary (Year 7 to Year 12 including secondary ungraded) per funded student rate: $1,415.66.

Number of eligible students

2023 NAPLAN data is used to identify students assessed as Needs Additional Support (NAS) in Reading and/or Numeracy and Exempt students in Years 3, 5, 7 and 9.

This is then used to extrapolate out and estimate the number of students needing literacy and/or numeracy support for the year levels with no new NAPLAN data.

For the purposes of funding, it is assumed that students absent from NAPLAN follow the school level distribution of NAS and Exempt students. The number of absent students is multiplied by the school level average percentage of NAS and Exempt students. The calculated percentage of absent students estimated to be NAS is then also extrapolated out to year levels with no new NAPLAN data to account for the additional estimated need.

For schools with no students who sat NAPLAN in 2023 (for example, very small primary schools without students in years 3 and 5), the corresponding system average % of NAS and Exempt students for primary or secondary year levels will be used.

For senior secondary schools, in 2024, the year 9 system average % of NAS and Exempt students is used to calculate funding. It is intended that this will transition to actual school data in future years once sufficient NAPLAN data for students attending senior secondary schools is available.

Funding formula

Primary

Provided if Primary enrolment > 0

Primary funding = Max of [Primary floor $26,500]

or

[Primary funded count × Primary per student rate]

Secondary

Provided if Secondary enrolment > 0

Secondary funding = Max of [Secondary floor $30,000]

or

[Secondary funded count × Secondary per student rate]

Combined

Total school funding = primary funding + secondary funding

School example

School A has 300 students. Students are distributed across the primary year levels, with 50 students in Year 3, 50 students in Year 5, and 200 students in the other primary year levels.

Students who have sat NAPLAN

At School A, there were 15 students who were NAS/Exempt in Reading and 25 students who were NAS/Exempt in Numeracy:

  • Year 3 Reading: 5 students
  • Year 5 Reading: 10 students
  • Year 3 Numeracy: 11 students
  • Year 5 Numeracy: 14 students
NAS + ExemptReadingNumeracyTotal
Year 351116
Year 5101424
Primary total152540

School A will receive funding for 40 students across reading and numeracy.

Students who have not sat NAPLAN

The percentage of students who need additional support in reading and numeracy is extrapolated out to the other year levels.

For School A, this is 15% of students for reading and 25% of students for Numeracy.

School A has 200 students in year levels which have not yet sat the new NAPLAN, so extrapolating out works out to be 15% × 200 + 25% × 200 = 80 students.

Additionally, School A had 10 absent students in both reading and numeracy. Therefore, next multiply the school level average percentage of students requiring TLI support by the number of absent students. In School A this works out to be 10 × 15% + 10 × 25% = 4 students.

This is then extrapolated out to the other year levels by using the school absent % × school funded %. For School A, extrapolated absences to the other year levels would result in in 10% × 15% × 200 = 3 students funded for reading and 10% × 25% × 200 = 5 students funded for numeracy, which adds up to 3 + 5 = 8 students.

Therefore, out of the students who have not yet sat the new NAPLAN, an additional 80 + 4 + 8 = 92 students have been projected as needing additional support in reading or numeracy.

Total funding

The total number of students in School A attracting funding is 40 + 92 = 132 students.

Total funding amount is thus 132 × per student rate = 132 × $1,247.32 = $164,646.64

As this is higher than the funding floor for the primary component of $26,500, School A will receive $164,646.64 as their final TLI allocation.

Special and language schools

The funding model for specialist and language schools will remain the same as the previous (2023) TLI funding model, with updated floor amounts.

Funding formula

Primary years and primary age equivalents

Provided if Primary enrolment > 0

Primary funding = Max of [Primary floor $26,500]

or

[Pri_total_enrol × Pri_enrol_rate + Pri_SD_enrol × Pri_SD_enrol_rate]

Secondary years and secondary age equivalents

Provided if Secondary enrolment > 0

Secondary funding = Max of [Secondary floor $30,000]

or

[Sec_total_enrol × Sec_enrol_rate + Sec_SD_enrol × Sec_SD_enrol_rate]

Combined primary and secondary years or age equivalents

Total school funding = primary funding + secondary funding

Rates for special and language schools

Primary per student rate: $157.98 (referenced as Pri_total_rate in calculation above).

Secondary per student rate: $178.77 (referenced as Sec_total_rate in calculation above).

Special social disadvantage per student rate: $424.96 (referenced as Pri_SD_enrol_rate in calculation above).

Special secondary social disadvantage per student rate*: $480.88 (referenced as Sec_SD_enrol_rate in calculation above).

Accountability

Schools are required to:

  • ensure eduPay records are updated by coding tutors as they are recruited. Schools must code tutors using the TLI code: 80026. Note that if tutors are being appointed from the school’s existing staff, their tutoring FTE must be re-coded to the TLI code: 80026 using a General Ledger (GL) override on eduPay
  • ensure students participating in TLI are identified in CASES21, including if the focus of support is literacy or numeracy
  • utilise an approved template for tutors to record students’ learning goals
  • support evaluation and monitoring of the initiative.

More information

For further information, please contact tutor@education.vic.gov.au


Mental Health in Primary Schools (Reference 130)

Mental Health in Primary Schools (Reference 130)

The Victorian Government is providing $200 million over 4 years and $93.7 million ongoing to expand the Mental Health in Primary Schools (MHiPS) program to every government and low-fee non-government primary school in Victoria.

Scaling up across the state from 2023, by 2026 every primary school will receive funding to employ a Mental Health and Wellbeing Leader to implement a whole-school approach to mental health and wellbeing.

Eligibility

All government school campuses with primary-aged enrolments are eligible for MHiPS funding, including:

  • Primary
  • Primary/Secondary (primary enrolments only)
  • Specialist (primary enrolments only)
  • Language (primary enrolments only)

‘Secondary’ and ‘Camp’ schools and campuses are ineligible for MHiPS funding.

MHiPS will be rolled out based on area between 2023 and 2026. The schedule is:

  • 2023: Barwon, Brimbank Melton, Goulburn, Hume Merri-bek, Outer Gippsland
  • 2024: Mallee, Ovens Murray, Southern Melbourne, Western Melbourne
  • 2025: Inner Gippsland; Loddon Campaspe, Outer Eastern Melbourne, Wimmera South West
  • 2026: Bayside Peninsula, Central Highlands, Inner Eastern Melbourne, North Eastern Melbourne

Virtual School Victoria is eligible for MhiPS funding. All MHiPS Pilot schools will continue participation in the statewide program from 2023. The pilot has now concluded.

Funding is calculated as the Indicative, Confirmed and Revised cycles; funding is allocated through credit funding.

Calculation

Participating government school campuses receive funding at the Classroom Teacher 2 salary mid-point, plus on costs, to employ a Mental Health and Wellbeing Leader. Each government school campus’ Full Time Equivalent (FTE) varies between 0.5 FTE to 1.0 FTE, based on primary enrolments.

Funding allocation = Base FTE × Rate + School on-costs

Base FTE
Campus enrolmentsFTE
1 to 1990.4
200 to 4990.5
500 to 6990.6
700 to 8490.7
850 to 9490.8
950+1

Enrolments used to calculate MHiPS funding will be updated at each SRP cycle (‘Indicative’ to reflect principal enrolment projections, ‘Confirmed’ to reflect February census enrolment and ‘Revised’ to reflect audited enrolments). Funding is allocated through credit funding.

Rate

Rate = $120,622.10 including school on-costs (Classroom Teacher 2 mid-point).

Schools that received Primary Welfare Officer (PWO) funding in the year prior to transitioning to MHiPS

The PWO initiative is transitioning to the MHiPS program from 2023.

Schools transitioning from the PWO initiative to the MHiPS program, in line with the above Area rollout schedule, will receive the higher of either their PWO allocation in the year prior to transitioning to MHIPS or their 2024 MHiPS allocation as calculated above.

This will appear under the MHiPS funding line in the SRP.

Schools that participated in the Mental Health in Primary Schools Pilot

Former government pilot schools will transition from their pilot funding allocation to the MHiPS statewide expansion funding model by 2025, in line with other schools participating in the program.

In 2024, former Pilot schools will receive:

  • the higher of either MHiPS funding based on enrolments, or 2022 Primary Welfare Officer (PWO) funding (with indexation), (appearing under the MHiPS funding line in the Student Resource Package (SRP)) plus
  • 50% of the 2022 PWO funding (with indexation) to support the step down from the dual funding allocation in line with all other schools transitioning from PWO funding to MHiPS funding, (appearing under the PWO funding line in the SRP)

plus, if the Pilot funding is higher than both the MHiPS funding and the PWO funding, schools will also receive:

  • 50% of the gap between the Pilot funding and the highest of the MHiPS funding based on enrolments or 2022 PWO funding (with indexation) (appearing under the MHiPS funding line in the SRP).

In 2025, former Pilot schools will receive the higher of either MHiPS funding based on enrolments, or 2022 Primary Welfare Officer (PWO) funding (with indexation). This will appear under the MHiPS funding line.

Contact information

For further information contact mentalhealth@education.vic.gov.au


Mental Health Practitioners in Specialist Schools (Reference 131)

Mental Health Practitioners in Specialist Schools (Reference 131)

The Mental Health Practitioners in Specialist Schools (MHP) initiative provides funding to government specialist school campuses with secondary-aged enrolments (12 years+) to employ a suitably qualified Mental Health Practitioner (that is, a fully registered Mental Health Nurse, Occupational Therapist, Psychologist or Social Worker) for between 2 and 4 days a week.

Mental Health Practitioners provide direct counselling support to students, early intervention services and whole-school mental health and wellbeing promotion and prevention activities. They also coordinate supports for students with complex needs.

For further information on the MHP initiative, refer to Mental health practitioners in secondary and specialist schoolsExternal Link in the department’s Mental health and wellbing toolkitExternal Link .

Student Resource Package (SRP) funding is provided to cover the salary of an ongoing school-based Mental Health Practitioner. Participating specialist schools receive between a minimum of 0.4 FTE and a maximum of 0.8 FTE, depending on their secondary-aged student enrolments.

This funding is provided for the Mental Health Practitioners initiative only and allocated funding must be spent for this purpose. Prior to spending any accrued unused funding, schools must engage with their Regional Mental Health Coordinator (MHC). Further information and advice about suitable alternative uses for unused funding can be found on the MHP initiative Policy and Advisory Library Page or via Regional MHCs.

Please note, schools that participated in the Health Promoting Schools pilot with Melbourne University and the Murdoch Children’s Research Institute will see a one-off increase in the cash component of their 2024 confirmed SRP payment. This increase covers the cost of CRT time-release for participating staff.

MHP initiative funding eligibility for schools with combined Primary/Secondary-aged enrolments

All participating specialist schools with secondary-aged enrolments receive funding for an ongoing MHP. For specialist schools with both primary and secondary-aged student enrolments, funding allocations will be determined based on secondary-aged (12+ years) enrolments only.

FTE allocations are fixed from the release of the Confirmed SRP (April 2023) for 2 years. At the conclusion of the 2-year period, FTE allocations will be reviewed and adjustments may be made.

Funding is allocated as credit and cash funding.

Special development campuses of mainstream schools are funded at school level.

Calculation

School FTE Allocation (Part 1) = FTE allocated as per below ranges:

  • less than 100 students = 0.4 FTE
  • greater than 100 to 250 students = 0.6 FTE
  • 250+ students = 0.8 FTE

Funding calculation (Part 2) = School FTE allocation (rounded to one decimal) * Rate

Rate

Rate = Midpoint of an Education Support, Level 1 Range 4, position including school SRP on-costs


Career Start – Transforming the First Years of the Teaching Career (Reference 132)

Career Start – Transforming the First Years of the Teaching Career (Reference 132)

Career Start is a structured program for graduate teachers which aims to improve their induction experience into the profession. It provides new graduate teachers and their mentors with additional time and support to focus on preparation, learning from others, targeted professional learning and networking opportunities through area-based alliances.

In 2024, Career Start is being delivered in all government schools in 5 areas:

  • Inner Gippsland
  • North Eastern Melbourne
  • Outer Eastern Melbourne
  • Southern Melbourne
  • Western Melbourne.

Graduate teachers with a Range 1, Level 1 classification will be provided with additional time release and support, as will their school-designated mentors. Each graduate teacher will participate in the program for one year.

The key component of the program is a reduction in face-to-face teaching time for graduate teachers and their mentors. Schools will be funded to employ additional classroom teachers to counteract this reduction and ensure continuity of teaching and learning.

Eligibility in 2024

Graduate teachers will participate in the Career Start program in 2024 if they commenced their first period of employment as a classroom teacher at CT 1-1 between 1 July 2023 and 7 June 2024 (both inclusive) at a Victorian government school within the Inner Gippsland, North Eastern Melbourne, Outer Eastern Melbourne, Southern Melbourne or Western Melbourne areas.

Rates and calculation

Career Start is funded to support schools in employing additional classroom teachers to counteract the reduction in teaching time provided to graduate teachers and their mentors. These teachers will be responsible for the teaching duties that graduate teachers and mentors will no longer be able to undertake.

The level of funding will be calculated based on the number of Range 1, Level 1 (1-1) graduates engaged in Victorian schools recorded on Edupay. It will be calculated in Term 1 and confirmed in Term 2 via the Student Resource Package (SRP).

Schools will receive funding from the first day of the term that the graduate begins employment. Graduates may commence in Career Start up until the revised SRP cycle cut-off date of 7 June 2024.

Please note: No further changes to the allocation will be made past 7 June 2024.

Any graduates who take up roles after 7 June 2024 in the 2024 school year are not eligible for participation in 2024 but will be eligible in 2025 as long as they commenced their first period of employment as a classroom teacher at a CT 1-1 classification in 2024 after 7 June 2024 and begin the 2025 school year as a CT 1-1. These ineligible graduates will still qualify for the 5% reduction in their teaching load for their first 12 months as per the VGSA 2022.

Formula for components

FTE of career start graduates × [(graduate time release × (salaries + oncosts) + mentor time release × (salaries + oncosts))] × [days/365]

Component A: Funding for Term 1 time release

Primary, Specialist and P–12 schools
  • Time release for graduates funded at 9.3% of a CT2-4 salary + 16.9% school oncosts
  • Time release for mentors funded at 4.8% of a CT2-6 salary + 16.9% school oncosts

[Total FTE of Career Start graduates] × [0.093 × ($102,162 + $17,265) + (0.048 × ($114,591 + 19,365)] × (0.21)

or

In 2024: [Total FTE of Career Start graduate teacher participants] × $3,689.41

Secondary schools
  • Time release for graduates funded at 8.5% of a CT2-4 salary + 16.9% school oncosts
  • Time release for mentors funded at 5.4% of a CT2-6 salary + 16.9% school oncosts

[Total FTE of Career Start graduates] × [0.085 × ($102,162 + $17,265) + (0.054 × ($114,591 + 19,365)] × (0.21)

or

In 2024: [Total FTE of Career Start graduate teacher participants] × $3,657.50

Component B: Funding for Terms 2 to 4 time release

Note: the below formulae account for the increase in teacher salaries at 1 July 2024 by calculating one term (0.21) of the payment using 2023–24 salaries, and 2 terms (0.5) of the payment using 2024–25 salaries.

Primary, Specialist & P–9/12 schools

[Total FTE of Career Start graduates] × [((0.093 × ($102,162 + $17,265)) + (0.048 × ($114,591 + 19,365))) × (0.21)] + [((0.093 × ($103,184 + $17,438) + (0.048 × ($115,737+ 19,559)) × (0.5))]

or

In 2024: [Total FTE of graduate teacher participants] × $12,497.54

Secondary schools

[Total FTE of Career Start graduates] × [((0.085 × ($102,162 + $17,265)) + (0.054 × ($114,591+ 19,365))) × (0.21)] + [((0.085 × ($103,184 + $17,438) + (0.054 × ($115,737 + 19,559)) × (0.5))]

or

In 2024: [Total FTE of graduate teacher participants] × $12,593.85

Total 2024 Career Start funding = Component A + Component B

Funds will be transferred to schools through the Student Resource Package (SRP) as a targeted initiative. Funding is allocated as credit.

Further information

For further information contact graduate.induction@education.vic.gov.au or visit Career Start – transforming the first years of the teaching careerExternal Link .


Secondary Sciences, Technologies and Mathematics initiative (Reference 133)

Secondary Sciences, Technologies and Mathematics initiative (Reference 133)

The Secondary Sciences, Technologies and Mathematics (SSTM) initiative has been developed to help address current workforce challenges in the teaching of science, technologies and mathematics in secondary schools.

As part of the 2022–23 Victorian State Budget, the government provided $10.1 million for the Secondary Sciences, Technologies and Mathematics (SSTM) initiative to address out-of-field teaching in the STEM disciplines.

Teachers who are currently teaching out‐of‐field will be supported to become ‘in-field’ by 2025 by undertaking a 2-year graduate certificate in mathematics, science, digital technologies or design and technologies education.

Eligibility

Schools with the following school type are eligible for the SSTM Initiative at campus level:

  • Secondary
  • Primary/Secondary Combined
  • Language
  • Special

The Language campuses of mainstream schools are also eligible.

Funding is calculated at the Confirmed and Revised budget cycles and provided through credit funding.

Calculation

Funding Allocation = Number of participating teachers × (0.1 × Level 2–6 salary + school on‐costs). This totals to $13,268 per year in 2023 and 2024 for each participating teacher.

Further information

Contact:


Outside School Hours Care Establishment Grant Initiative (Reference 134)

Outside School Hours Care Establishment Grant Initiative (Reference 134)

The Outside School Hours Care Establishment Grant Initiative (the Initiative) will support schools that have not previously had outside school hours care (OSHC) to establish new OSHC services, or to expand existing OSHC services to meet community need.

The Initiative prioritises schools which meet the following 4 priority categories:

  • Priority 1: Schools in DE areas, or parts thereof, with limited or no OSHC services.
  • Priority 2: Schools with demonstrated readiness to commence services by Term 1, 2024.
  • Priority 3: Schools where services are unlikely to be viable without grant funding.
  • Priority 4: Schools with existing OSHC services that demonstrate a need to expand existing service provision.

The program is broken into 4 rounds over 4 financial years.

Schools may use the funds to cover costs associated with initially providing access to OSHC services for students and operational expenses over the lifetime of the funding. The funding will allow services that may not initially be financially viable to expand and work towards ongoing viability over the grant period.

Accountability

Schools are responsible for using the funds within the guidelines provided by the department. School principals will be required to complete an acquittal process once per year for each year of funding received, demonstrating that the funds were used for expenditure within the Initiative’s guidelines.

Eligibility

Interested schools will apply for the funding using a form on the SmartyGrants online portal. Further advice will be provided closer to the launch. All Victorian government schools which provide primary aged or special education to children, and who either do not have an OSHC service at the time of application, or do not offer all three types of care (before school care, after school care and vacation care) are eligible to apply. This includes primary schools, combined primary/secondary schools, and specialist schools.

Funding

The maximum amount of funding offered is $75,000 per year per applicant school, except where the school is applying on behalf of a cluster of schools, in which case the maximum is $75,000 times the number of school sites involved in the cluster. In a cluster arrangement, one school establishes the service, with nearby schools able to access it on an equal footing. Schools or clusters may apply up to the maximum amount if they have proposed expenditure to that amount which meets the Initiative guidelines. In order to be eligible for the increased funding cap, all cluster schools must meet the grant eligibility requirements.

Special schools are eligible for an additional $30,000. Schools in areas designated as Outer Regional or Remote are eligible for an additional $25,000.

Funding allocations are 100% Cash funding.

Use of Initiative funding

School principals will consider the context of their school and the needs of the school community to determine the best use of the funding. A school may decide to use the funding to establish an OSHC service run by the school council, engage a third-party provider to operate a new service, or provide transport to enable children to access OSHC at an already operating service. New services may be established at the school or at external premises.

Examples of eligible expenditure include:

  • staffing
  • training and professional development
  • program management and administration
  • resources and/or equipment
  • minor facility upgrades
  • transport
  • food
  • programs/activities to attract or retain enrolments.

Teach Today and Teach Tomorrow Programs (Reference 135)

Teach Today and Teach Tomorrow Programs (Reference 135)

Teach Today and Teach Tomorrow (TTTT) programs seek to boost the supply of teachers in Victorian government schools, particularly in outer-metropolitan, rural and remote locations and in priority subject areas. The department is working in partnership with the following Initial Teacher Education (ITE) providers to attract and train local teachers:

  • Australian Catholic University (ACU)
  • Deakin University
  • Federation University
  • La Trobe University (Nexus)
  • RMIT
  • Teach For Australia (ACU)
  • Victoria University
  • the University of Melbourne.

The TTTT programs provide teaching students with paid employment in Victorian government schools as education support staff or teaching paraprofessionals while they complete an undergraduate or postgraduate teaching degree.

Teach Today students receive a $2,400 department scholarship for the initial intensive study period prior to working in a classroom as a pre-service teacher for 18 to 24 months.

Teach Tomorrow students receive a $15,000 department scholarship while they study for the first 6 to 12 months prior to being employed as education support staff or pre-service teachers for the remainder of their studies.

All students who identify as Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander will also receive an additional $15,000 department scholarship to support them during the program.

All students who relocate to a rural or regional school for the employment element of the program may also be eligible for a $2,000 relocation incentive to assist with relocation costs.

CRT payments will be allocated directly to participating schools at a rate of 6 CRT days per participating student teacher to support the host school in releasing the mentor teacher from the classroom to spend time mentoring the participating student during their employment.

Targeted school support funding is available to eligible schools interested in hosting a student to mitigate financial barriers. Approximately $31,000 will be provided to eligible schools facing budget constraints, level of hard-to-staff and consultation with the relevant regional office.

Refer to: Employment-Based Degrees: Teach Today and Teach Tomorrow Programs.

Eligibility

  • Primary Schools
  • Secondary Schools
  • P-12 Schools
  • Specialist Schools

Specifically, schools must be hosting students as part of this program to be eligible for this allocation.

Students enrolled in an employment-based program with the Australian Catholic University (ACU), Deakin University, Federation University, La Trobe University (Nexus), RMIT, Teach For Australia, Victoria University, and the University of Melbourne are completing a Master of Teaching Secondary while being hosted by a secondary or specialist school through Teach Today and Teach Tomorrow programs.

Students enrolled in the employment-based program with La Trobe University (Nexus) are completing a Master of Teaching Primary while being hosted by a Primary or specialist school through Teach Today and Teach Tomorrow programs.

Funding will be allocated in instalments in March (confirmed) and August (indicative cycle) through credit and cash funding and is calculated by the program area.

Rates

Scholarship rates

  • Teach Today program students receive a $2,400 department scholarship.
  • Teach Tomorrow program students receive a $15,000 department scholarship.
  • All students who identify as Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander will also receive an additional $15,000 department scholarship.

CRT rates

CRT payments will be allocated directly to participating schools at a rate of 6 CRT days per participating student teacher to support the host school in releasing the mentor teacher from the classroom to spend time mentoring the participating student during their employment. CRT rate will be the ministerial rate.

Targeted support payments

Targeted school support funding is available to eligible schools interested in hosting a student to mitigate financial barriers. Approximately $31,000 will be provided to eligible schools facing budget constraints, level of hard-to-staff and consultation with the relevant regional office.

Relocation expenses

All students who relocate to a rural or regional school for the employment element of the program may also be eligible for a $2,000 relocation incentive to assist with relocation costs.

Please note the allocations do not include payroll tax and superannuation and will not attract these charges in the SRP Budget Management report.

Further Information

Teach the Future websiteExternal Link

The Program team: teach.today.teach.tomorrow@education.vic.gov.au


Inclusion Outreach Coaching initiative (Reference 136)

Inclusion Outreach Coaching Initiative (Reference 136)

Background and context

In 2021 the Department of Education (the department) announced a number of initiatives including the Inclusion Outreach Coaching (IOC) initiative, to support school workforces to build their capabilities in inclusive practices. These initiatives were part of a state wide Disability Inclusion Reform to support schools to ensure that students of all need feel welcomed and thrive.

The IOC initiative is being rolled out by area from 2021 to 2025 (refer to Disability Inclusion Funding and Support for further information) with an IOC coach being employed in ‘base’ registered specialist schools (base school) and ‘partnering’ with mainstream schools (partner school). IOC coaches are employed at a Learning Specialist classification (please see Leading Teachers and Learning Specialists for further information) to ensure they have the leadership experience and contextual understanding of schools to provide strategically coordinated capability building opportunities to mainstream schools, including whole-of-school training, in-class coaching and individual teacher support to build inclusive school cultures. IOCs do not work with individual students.

A regional workforce provides each coach with operational and strategic support and acts as the conduit between the coach and the base and partner schools; particularly in the recruitment of coaches in base schools and the facilitation of the coaches’ engagement with partner schools. Base school principals are encouraged to nominate a mentor to the IOC to support the coach in their connections and linkages within the base school and amongst schools to support an aligned build of inclusive practices in the area.

A team of implementation specialists from Inclusive Education support the school and regional workforces to effectively deliver best practice approaches to inclusive education and wellbeing and to lead effective policy and program implementation which enables access to high quality education services.

SRP funding allocation

Credit allocation to recruit an IOC coach

Base schools about to enter a rollout year will automatically be provided SRP credits as part of their indicative funding to support the recruitment of a full- time ongoing IOC coach. The credit allocation is calculated at the annualised mid-point of a Learning Specialist Level 3-1 and 3-2 (plus school oncosts which cover a school’s liability for payroll tax and superannuation) as per the VGSA 2022 Agreement.

For the 2024 calendar year: each school will receive $145,778 (FTE).

Please see Student Resource Package — Targeted Initiatives: Inclusion Outreach Coaching (IOC) initiative (Reference 136) and Victorian Government Schools Agreement 2022 (PDF)External Link for further information.

If circumstances require the recruitment of a new coach part way through the year and an SRP allocation was not provided as part of a base school’s indicative SRP budget, then this will be indexed on a pro rata basis depending on what time of year the coach commences employment. For example, if a coach commences in Term 2, then an SRP allocation of 50% of the full allocation will be provided.

Cash allocations to support the travel allowance requirements of an IOC coach

IOC coaches are required to travel from their base specialist school to partner non-specialist schools, regional offices, and other department locations and workplaces to support their coaching role. To contribute to the costs associated with this, the department will provide each base school with cash SRP allocations. Principals are encouraged to monitor travel spending together with their IOC regularly and seek advice from the regional or central support teams when funds are getting close to being spent.

For the 2024 calendar year:

  • rural schools will receive $4,250 (which equates to 5,000 km of travel per coach)
  • metropolitan schools will receive $2,550 (which equates to 3,000 km of travel per coach).

These allocations will be rolled out in quarterly allotments, at the start of each Term.

These figures are based on the current maximum Australian Tax Office allowable claim of 5,000 km per year at a rate of $0.785 per kilometre. (Please see Travel and Personal Expenses — Teaching Service and Expenses for a car you own or lease (ATO)External Link for further information).

Questions, comments, feedback

Please contact inclusion.outreach.coaching@education.vic.gov.au if you have any further questions.


School Mental Health Fund (Reference 139)

School Mental Health Fund (Reference 139)

In response to the Royal Commission into Victoria’s Mental Health System (Royal Commission), the 2021-22 Victorian State Budget provided $200 million over 4 years and $86.85 million ongoing to create a new Schools Mental Health Fund (Fund). The Fund provides additional resources to government schools to support and further promote student mental health and wellbeing.

The Fund provides schools with funding to strengthen school-wide capacity and capability to improve students’ mental health and wellbeing. An evidence-based Menu underpins the Fund to give schools confidence in purchasing programs and interventions that will meet their students’ needs. Schools are required to spend their Fund allocation on items listed on the Menu.

For further information on the School Mental Health Fund refer to: Mental Health Fund and Menu.

Eligibility

  • Primary Schools
  • Secondary Schools
  • P–12 Schools
  • Specialist Schools

The Fund was rolled out to government schools based on area between 2022 and 2024, with rural and regional schools prioritised, in line with the Royal Commission’s findings. All government schools now receive the Fund.

Note: Camp/outdoor schools and Parkville College are not eligible to receive the Fund. Hospital Schools and Victorian School of Languages are only funded at base rate with no enrolment funding.

Calculation

Funding will be allocated as credit (70%) and cash (30%). School on-cost rates (superannuation and payroll tax) are applied to the credit proportion.

All schools start with a base allocation amount of $25,000.

Regional and rural loading

All regional and rural schools receive an extra loading (10%).

Small school threshold

  • All schools with 200 students or less will get the base allocation
  • A per student rate will apply above 200 students

Enrolments used to calculate the Fund will be updated at each SRP cycle (Indicative to reflect principal enrolment projections, Confirmed to reflect February census enrolment and Revised to reflect audited enrolments).

Large school threshold

A slightly lower per student rate will apply above the large school threshold number of students:

  • Primary: 600 students
  • Secondary: 1,200 students
  • Primary/Secondary: 900 students
  • Other: 600 students

Rate

  • Per student rate starts to apply above 200 students
  • The model has tailored rates for primary and secondary, responding to the Royal Commission’s call for more primary support
Outline of student rates for small and large schools 2023 (full rollout level)
Per student rates (2023)SmallLarge
Primary$92.00$72.00
Secondary$82.00$62.00
Primary/Secondary$87.00$67.00
Other$87.00$67.00

Casual Relief Teacher Travel Fund (Reference 141)

Casual Relief Teacher Travel Fund (Reference 141)

The Casual Relief Teacher (CRT) Travel Fund has been implemented to attract more CRTs to rural and regional schools. Funding was allocated to identified schools experiencing difficulty attracting CRTs in 2024. Eligible schools can use this funding as an incentive to attract CRTs to their school for extended periods, paid as a special paymentExternal Link . Schools considering offering a special payment to attract CRTs will be able to pay a lump sum of a minimum of $925 to a maximum of $10,000 per annum.

Eligibility criteria for recipients of the funding

An analysis was completed by the department that measures workforce challenges, including remoteness, Student Family Occupation and Education (SFOE), low application rate, no appointment rate and school climate which is the basis of the allocated funding to the identified schools. The funding amount distributed to individual schools is calculated by the number of students in each school and the average class size.

The listed schools include:

  • Primary schools
  • Secondary schools
  • Primary/Secondary schools
  • Special schools

Funding

The funding is given to schools through the SRP’s targeted initiatives funding stream and is allocated as cash funding. The CRT Travel Fund payment will be:

  • directly paid to the agency that has supplied the CRT or
  • paid through a special payment directly via eduyPay to the CRT employed by school council as a one-off lump sum.

Contact

Enquiries relating to the CRT Travel Fund should be directed to: swg_policy.initiatives@education.vic.gov.au


Active Schools (Reference 142)

Active Schools (Reference 142)

The Active Schools initiative aims to ensure that all Victorian students have the skills, confidence and motivation to be active in life.

Active Schools Grants ($30,000) aim to help implement a whole-school approach to improving physical activity and supporting students to be more active. Grant funds may be used for infrastructure or equipment, staff professional development, or engagement with physical activity programs and providers.

Active Schools Physical Education (PE) and Sport Funding Boosts ($3,000) aim to support schools with the costs of physical education, sport and outdoor education. Schools are encouraged to consider innovative ways this funding can be used to encourage an increased uptake of physical activity in their school. Schools may elect to use this funding to boost their physical education or sports budget or spend the funding on items such as outdoor education, bike storage or playground improvements.

Active Schools Extracurricular Boosts ($14,000) aim to support secondary schools with the costs of providing extracurricular physical activity opportunities. Funding may be spent on the cost of running sporting, recreational or physical activity programs either before or after school or during break times. This may include engaging the community or private providers to run programs or paying for casual relief teachers to enable the school to run programs.

Further detail on what funds can be used for is detailed on Active schoolsExternal Link .

Funds cannot be used for:

  • purchase of IT equipment
  • school staff salaries
  • items not related to improving physical activity outcomes.

Funding will be distributed through the Student Resource Package.

Eligibility

  • Active Schools grants: $30,000 will be awarded to 100 primary, secondary, language and specialist schools in 2023 and 2024 following a competitive grant process open for each year to eligible schools in communities experiencing social disadvantage. Eligibility to apply is based on SFOE and applications are assessed against the Active Schools Framework and on how the school will implement activities to strengthen its current approach to student physical activity. There are 25 grants available in each region.
  • Active Schools PE and Sport Boost: $3,000 for 300 government primary, secondary, Primary/Secondary, language and specialist schools in 2023 and 2024 in communities experiencing social disadvantage based on SFOE ranking state-wide, which can be used to support schools with the cost of PE and sport and outdoor education.
  • Active Schools Extracurricular Boost: $14,000 for 200 government secondary, Primary/Secondary, language and specialist schools in 2023 and 2024 in communities experiencing social disadvantage based on SFOE ranking state-wide, which can be used by schools to support the costs of providing extracurricular activities.

Rates

  • Active Schools grants: $30,000 for each eligible school.
  • Active Schools PE and Sport Boost: $3,000 for each eligible school.
  • Active Schools Extracurricular Boost: $14,000 for each eligible school.

Physical and Sport Education – Delivery Requirements


Vocational Education and Training Delivered to School Students (Reference 143)

Vocational Education and Training Delivered to School Students (Reference 143)

Program description

Vocational Education and Training (VET) Delivered to School Students (VDSS) is a key component of the Victorian Government's strategy to support high-quality vocational pathways, increase student retention, and improve Year 12 or equivalent completion rates by providing options for all students.

VET studies can contribute towards the completion of the Victorian Certificate of Education (VCE).

The core learning allocation in the Student Resource Package (SRP) provided to schools for each student is the primary source of funding for VET programs. Government schools are also provided with targeted VET funding to support the higher cost of provision in this area.

Components of VET funding

There are 4 components of VET funding:

  • the Core student learning component (mainstream schools) or Stages of Learning funding (specialist schools) of the SRP
  • targeted VET funding
  • VET materials funding
  • small-scale adjustment.

SRP Core Student Learning or Core Stages of Learning components

The Core Student Learning component or Stages of Learning funding of the SRP is provided to schools to offset the costs of VDSS.

In 2024, the Core SRP component that a mainstream school will receive to support the delivery of VET is $1,271, per full time equivalent (FTE) certificate enrolment.

For specialist schools, with students participating in eligible VET certificates, the Stages of Learning component that a school will receive to contribute to support the delivery of VET is $1,058, per FTE certificate enrolment.

A Full Time Equivalent (FTE) enrolment in an eligible VET course is defined as 180 hours of training per year. This will attract the full per certificate amount. Enrolments of less than 180 hours of training in a year will attract pro-rata funding.*

*CUA30915 Certificate III in Music Industry, for which a FTE enrolment is 170 hours.

Targeted VET funding

Targeted VET funding is based on a 6-band model and is allocated pro-rata for enrolments up to 180 hours per VET certificate per year.

To attract targeted VET funding, schools must enter accurate details of all VET enrolments on the Victorian Assessment Software System (VASS) by the annual VET enrolment deadline, which is 30 April in 2024.

Enrolments for students between 15 to 20 years of age (inclusive) at the annual VET enrolment deadline enrolled in eligible VET certificates will attract targeted VET funding.

Certificate II and Certificate III level qualifications (excluding school-based apprenticeships and traineeships and Head Start apprenticeships and traineeships) undertaken as part of the VCE are eligible for targeted VET funding. Some certificates are subject to restrictions, and schools should always check with the Victorian Curriculum and Assessment Authority (VCAA) VET Unit if they are unsure whether a certificate is appropriate for senior secondary students.
Certificate IV and above qualifications may be funded, provided the school has first gained approval from VCAA to offer the higher-level qualification to VCE students.

Further information and an indicative list of VET qualifications eligible for targeted VET funding is available at: VET Delivered to School Students: Resources.

Targeted VET funding is NOT available for enrolments in:

  • Certificate I qualifications
  • certificates in General Education for Adults and generalist programs such as Certificate II in EAL (Employment); Certificate II in EAL (Access) and Certificate III in School Based Education Support
  • most Certificate IV and above qualifications, including Diploma-level. Schools wishing to provide Diplomas may fund this delivery from the core SRP allocation. There are some exceptions to this, notably the Diploma of Aviation (Commercial Pilot Licence – Aeroplane) where it is offered by a pre-approved list of providers. Further information is available on the Vocational Education and Training Delivered to School Students PAL page
  • school-based apprenticeships and traineeships, or Head Start apprenticeships and traineeships.

A student who is enrolled in a school, either full-time or part-time, and also enrolled independently of their school in a VET program at a TAFE or Registered Training Organisation (RTO), is not eligible to have their VET studies subsidised through targeted VET funding.

VET materials funding

In 2024, a 2-band VET materials funding model will be in place (high-cost materials funding band and low-cost materials funding band). The level of funding received will be based on VET enrolments, and payments will be received as quarterly cash grants through the Student Resource Package (SRP).

Each VET enrolment will be allocated $250 for certificates that sit within the low-cost materials funding band and $450 for those that sit within the high-cost materials funding band. This funding is not subject to pro rata and will be allocated in full for each enrolment regardless of the number of hours in which a student is enrolled.

For further information on VET materials funding, visit Vocational Education and Training (VET) Delivered to School Students.

Small-scale adjustment

In 2024, eligible schools will receive a small-scale adjustment based on their total Years 7 to 12 enrolments. The funding is provided for schools that do not have the scale of student enrolments to offset VDSS costs.

Schools with 200 or fewer students will receive additional funding, for up to 15 VDSS FTE enrolments, at either the equivalent SRP Core component value (mainstream schools) or Core Stages of Learning component value (specialist schools).

Schools with enrolments between 201 and 400 students receive a pro-rata allocation. Schools with enrolments greater than 400 will not be eligible for this funding.

Online budget planner

The SRP Planner has been enhanced to enable schools the capacity to model VDSS enrolment scenarios to assess funding outcomes.

The tool will allow administrators to input certificate types and enrolments and receive a breakdown of estimated funding for 2024.

The tool aims to improve schools’ understanding of the funding streams available for VDSS and to support better financial planning.

Funding formula

The funding allocation to support the provision of VET comprises:

Eligible FTE certificate enrolments × Funding level (Core SRP component + Targeted VET funding) (for students aged from 15 years to 20 years of age (inclusive) at annual VET enrolment deadline

Plus:

Small-scale adjustment (Eligible VDSS FTE enrolments (up to 15 FTE) × Small-scale adjustment rate (where total Year 7-12 enrolments ≤ 400).

VET materials funding rates for 2024
BandMaterials funding rate
Low-cost materials$250.00
High-cost materials$450.00

Small-scale adjustment rates

Mainstream schools: Maximum rate is $1,271 per enrolment capped at 15 enrolments for eligible schools with up to 200 students. For schools with enrolments between 201 and 400 students, the rate reduces by $6.32 per student.

Special schools: Maximum rate is $1,058 per enrolment capped at 15 enrolments for eligible schools with up to 200 students. For schools with enrolments between 201 and 400 students, the rate reduces by $5.26 per student.

The amount of funding received in Terms 1 and 2 will be based on enrolment figures from 2023. This funding amount will be adjusted accordingly pending the correctly entered enrolments at the annual VET enrolment deadline (30 April 2024).

It is important for schools to correctly enter enrolments on VASS by the due date, including the certificate title, units of competency, and hours, as there is no capacity to provide funding to schools that have not entered VET enrolments on VASS at all or have entered them with incorrect information.

School-based apprenticeships and traineeships

A student enrolled in a VET qualification through a school-based apprenticeship or traineeship (SBAT) is funded under Skills First and is not eligible for VDSS funding. For assessment purposes, students undertaking VET as part of an SBAT are still able to gain credit towards completion of their senior secondary certificate. Further information on SBATs is available at: School-Based Apprenticeships and TraineeshipsExternal Link .

Head Start

In 2023, the Head Start program was rolled out to all Victorian government secondary schools. Head Start provides an innovative approach that encourages students to undertake an apprenticeship or traineeship with high-quality Certificate III qualifications in priority industries as part of their senior secondary studies. Like all SBATs, Head Start apprenticeships and traineeshipsExternal Link are funded through Skills First.

School VET fees and charges

VET programs are considered standard curriculum and therefore government schools must provide VET tuition free of charge. Government schools cannot require payments from parents or families for essential learning materials for VET studies. Schools can invite students, parents or families to contribute voluntarily to the school’s overall VET program, but non-payment of this voluntary contribution cannot preclude a student’s involvement in the program.

Schools can invite parents or families to purchase items and activities associated with a VET course that enhance or broaden the schooling experience of students and are additional to or outside what the school provides for free to deliver the curriculum (for example, an optional course-related excursion or non-standard classroom materials). It is at a school’s discretion to determine whether an item or activity associated with a VET course is extra-curricular.

As all VET courses provided to students by the school are delivered as part of the Curriculum, the option for students to choose between VET courses does not qualify a course as extra-curricular.

Schools can also invite parents to bring from home or purchase VET tools and equipment directly from third parties instead of using what is made available for free by the school. When inviting parents to purchase VET tools and equipment directly from a third-party provider, the school may include a list of recommended tools and equipment. If a parent does not provide or purchase their own tools and equipment, the school must ensure that students have free access to tools and equipment as required for the school’s delivery of the Curriculum.

Schools are not required to provide students with items to own, or keep, on a one-to-one basis. However, schools must determine appropriate resourcing to ensure students have access to the relevant VET tools and equipment for the duration required to access the Curriculum.

Schools are not obliged to provide safety equipment that is considered part of a student’s uniform/clothing or is specifically fitted to them (for example, safety boots, closed shoes).

VET materials are items required for the provision of a VET program. These items are necessarily consumed or transformed by students as part of training or assessment requirements.

  • Where an item or part of an item is consumed or transformed through the undertaking of the VET program the item is deemed as a consumable and is covered by VET materials funding provided to schools. Examples include ingredients for a recipe, make up kits, and workbooks students need to complete as part of assessment.
  • Where an item is retained by a student, is usable beyond the life of the VET program, and is not consumed or transformed (in part or the whole) this item is considered to be non-consumable and should be purchased by the student or their family. Examples include boots, hammers, and hairbrushes. Some providers purchase these items for students and then invoice the students or their families while others will provide students with a list of items to be purchased by the student or their family directly.

Use of targeted VET funding

Targeted VET funding allocated to support VET provision can be used for a range of purposes.

This may include:

  • a contribution towards the purchase of delivery
  • a contribution towards teacher professional development and training
  • costs associated with registering as an RTO
  • program planning
  • purchase of curriculum materials, and
  • costs associated with the transition to new training packages.

Contractual arrangements between schools and VET providers

Schools entering into arrangements with RTOs are strongly encouraged to use the appropriate department template and must have a valid signed contract in place before training delivery begins.

The available standard contracts and agreements are: Standard VET purchasing contract, Standard VET Auspicing contract, School to school VET purchasing agreement, and School to school VET access agreement.

The templates have been designed for the specific use of government schools purchasing services from RTOs and are not recommended for use by other parties. Use of the templates by other parties is subject to the department’s copyright licensing arrangements (detailed at the base of the website’s landing page).

For more information on guidelines for the delivery of VET to secondary school students and the template Contracts and Agreements refer to: Purchasing Secondary Courses and Vocational Training from External Providers.

Timing of payments to schools

Government schools are provided with targeted funding for every eligible VET certificate enrolment provided they have entered the certificates, units and hours for each VET enrolment on VASS no later than annual VET enrolment deadline (30 April 2024). Payments are made in the quarterly cash grant through the Student Resource Package (SRP), as per the schedule details below.

Timing of payments to schools
TermsAllocationEnrolment basis
125% of Indicative funding2023 enrolments applying 2023 Revised Band Levels
225% of Indicative funding2023 enrolments applying 2023 Revised Band Levels
2/3Term 1 and 2 adjustments to school budgetsN/A
325% of Revised funding2024 Confirmed enrolments applying 2024 Confirmed Band Levels
425% of Revised funding2024 Confirmed enrolments applying 2024 Confirmed Band Levels

Professional development for newly appointed VASS users

In the early part of each year, the Victorian Curriculum and Assessment Authority (VCAA) conducts professional development training specifically designed for VASS administrators who are new to their position or who have never used VASS, and new schools offering a VCE or VET program for the first time.

Any queries related to VASS Operations should be directed to the VCAA’s VASS Support team:


NDIS Navigators (Reference 146)

NDIS Navigators (Reference 146)

In the 2023-24 State Budget the Victorian Government announced a $202.9 million package for students with disability. This included the introduction of NDIS Navigators in Victorian government specialist schools.

NDIS Navigators provide support to families and carers to help them to navigate and understand the NDIS, enabling them to get the most out of the supports available. They will also help schools, families and carers to understand the NDIS-education interface.

The NDIS Navigator initiative is funded for 4 years from 2023/2024. It will be progressively rolled out to all Victorian government specialist schools from July 2023 with all schools having NDIS Navigator funding by the end of 2025.

For further information on NDIS Navigators see: NDIS Navigators.

Eligibility

Victorian government specialist schools will be eligible for funding allocation.

As indicated in Table 1, the allocation model will be progressively rolled out to all Victorian government specialist schools from September 2023 over 3 tranches, with a full complement in place by the end of 2025.

Table 1: NDIS navigator workforce allocation, per school (proposed scale out)
2023 (Tranche 1)2024 (Tranches 1 and 2)2025 (Tranches 1, 2 and 3)2026
Workforce FTE15 FTE32 FTE49 FTE49 FTE
Number of schoolsApproximately 30Approximately 609797

Calculation

The funding model consists of an FTE allocation based on school enrolments:

  • less than 42 students = 0.2 FTE
  • 42 to 185 students = 0.4 FTE
  • 186 to 300 students = 0.6 FTE
  • 301 to 400 students = 0.8 FTE
  • more than 400 students = 1.0 FTE

The model has fixed FTE allocation bands throughout the life of the initiative, from the first SRP allocation in 2023.

Multicampus threshold

Additional loading for very large schools (more than 450 enrolments) with more than 2 campuses will be applied.

Funding calculation

School FTE allocation (rounded to one decimal) × Midpoint of an Education Support, Level 1 Range 4, position including school SRP on-costs.


Specialist School Activity Boost (Reference 147)

Specialist School Activity Boost (Reference 147)

The Specialist School Activity Boost provides funding to specialist schools (with students with disability as their focus) and Supported Inclusion Schools to support them with the cost of delivering activities such as arts, sports, cultural and social programs to their students.

Activities play an important role in supporting students with disability to learn and thrive at school, by boosting learning engagement and motivation, as well as building a sense of connection with friends, teachers and their community. However, specialist schools and Supported Inclusion Schools can face higher costs in making these experiences available to their students due to factors such as higher teacher to student ratios and use of specialised equipment in delivering activities. The Specialist School Activity Boost will provide these schools with additional financial resources to help them run these important activities for their students.

Funds may be used, for example:

  • engaging external organisations to deliver targeted arts, sports, cultural or social programs for students conducting other similar activities
  • for student attendance at camps
  • establishing partnerships with local sports clubs (for example, local bowling club) to deliver activities for students
  • purchasing resources or equipment to establish regular in-school access to activities (for example, giant 10-pin bowling equipment)
  • developing targeted sports, arts, cultural and social experiences to be delivered by staff in-school
  • for CRT costs to release school staff to deliver activities
  • for ancillary costs, such as transport to attend externally provided activities.

Further detail on suggested activities to be undertaken is detailed on PAL.

Funds cannot be used for:

  • salary for members of school staff
  • staffing costs for covering time in lieu associated with delivery of activities
  • items not related to delivering activities to students.

Funding will be distributed as a cash payment through the Student Resource Package.

Eligibility

All specialist schools (with students with disability as their focus) and Supported Inclusion Schools will receive this funding. This does not include the following Parkville or hospital schools.

School numberCampus numberSchool name
89165Parkville College
89161Parkville College
35526Yarra Me School
36051The Austin School
44651Travancore School
63631Avenues Education
89163Parkville College
89164Parkville College

Rates

All eligible schools will receive funding based on February census enrolment figures, as outlined below:

  • $8,000 minimum (for schools with 1 to 50 students)
  • $36,000 maximum (for schools with over 225 students).

Funding to schools in between the minimum and maximum is calculated at a rate of $160 per capita.

Supported Inclusion Schools are allocated funds based on 10% of their total enrolment to deliver activities that are inclusive and support the participation of students with disability.

Accountability

Expenditure should be allocated in CASES21 to the code: 5103 – Specialist School Activity Boost.


Flexible work for school leaders initiative (Reference 151)

Flexible work for school leaders initiative (Reference 151)

The 2023–24 state budget allocated $9.5 million for a pilot program trialling flexible work for school leaders in 2024. All educational leaders, including principals, assistant principals, leading teachers and learning specialists, were able to apply for funding to trial part time and job share arrangements.

The funding is to be used to cover:

  • a cross-over day as part of a new job-share arrangement (where a substantive leader reduces their time fraction with a higher duties backfill)
  • a cross-over day as part of a co-principal arrangement (where 2 people are substantively appointed to a principal role through a merit based recruitment process)
  • 0.2 FTE of a new part time role or an existing part time role where the employee has increased their time fraction.

Objectives of the Flexible work for school leaders initiative include:

  • increasing uptake of flexible work for all employees by encouraging modelling at leadership levels
  • providing more options for greater work-life balance for leaders who wish to participate
  • providing pathways for senior leaders who wish to transition to retirement, and potentially retaining those employees in the workforce for a short extension of time
  • increasing the leadership profile of Victorian government schools
  • redefining the potential for leadership positions to be broader than just 1.0 FTE and filled by only one person.

Eligibility

All educational leader positions are eligible for funding, including:

  • principals
  • assistant principals
  • leading teachers
  • learning specialists.

Calculation

Funding will be allocated as credit (100%).

Schools will receive a grant equivalent to 0.2FTE of the salary of the role that has a flexible work arrangement in place.

School on-costs and the scheduled salary increase from 1 July 2024 under the Victorian Government Schools Agreement 2022 are included in the total grant.

Rate

The initiative has tailored rates, depending on the leadership position with the approved flexible work arrangement in place, and the step* and range of the position.

Leadership positionRange 1Range 2Range 3Range 4Range 5Range 6
Principaln/a$35,653.45$39,544.35$42,911.42$47,386.47$51,292.21
Assistant principal$31,020.82$33,955.59$37,661.32$40,979.30n/an/a
Leading teachern/an/a$28,271.45n/an/an/a
Learning specialistn/an/a$28,271.45n/an/an/a

*Note: the default step is step 1 in each range.

Funding for Rounds 1 and 2 will be allocated in the confirmed SRP, and funding for Round 3 will be allocated in the revised SRP.

Participants can choose to discontinue their flexible working arrangement. If this is the case, or if there are any other changes in your flexible work arrangement, please advise the Workplace Relations team (workplace.relations@education.vic.gov.au) to update your details and adjust payments received via future SRP released.

Schools will not be required to backpay money from the first instalment paid via the SRP, if a flexible work arrangement is discontinued before the scheduled period. The department has an expectation, however, that any surplus funding would be used to support flexible work arrangement generally at the school.

Relevant information


Hindi and Punjabi beacon schools (Reference 152)

Hindi and Punjabi beacon schools (Reference 152)

Detail of program

The Victorian Government committed $3.5 million over 4 years in the 2023–24 State Budget to establish 3 beacon schools to teach Hindi and/or Punjabi in Melbourne’s west, north and south-eastern suburbs.

The beacon schools will offer high quality learning in Hindi and/or Punjabi to background and non-background speakers while serving as system leaders in these languages by sharing and harnessing best practice and resources that promote improvement in students’ language competencies.

The funding is administered by the Languages Unit, Curriculum and Teaching Practice Division.

Eligibility

Following a selection process, 3 schools have been chosen as Victoria’s first Hindi/Punjabi beacon schools – one in each of Melbourne’s West, North, and South-Eastern suburbs.

Funding rates

Each beacon school will be funded $1 million over 4 years from 2024 to 2027 to establish and implement a sustainable Hindi/Punjabi beacon school model.

Funding is calculated at the Confirmed cycle. Funding is allocated through cash (10 per cent) and credit funding (90 per cent).

Contact

Email: languages.query@education.vic.gov.au


Resources

Resources

School student resource package (SRP) interactive site (staff login required)

To see budget and planner reports for principals and delegates, login to student resource packageExternal Link

Current SRP guidance

Senior secondary re-engagement

Vocational education and training delivered to school students

TAFE Supplement Revised ModellingExternal Link

Refugee and asylum seeker wellbeing supplement

Information sheetExternal Link

Student Excellence Program Funding

Student Excellence Program – Guide for School Leaders, January 2022 (DOCX)External Link (staff login required)

Primary Welfare

Primary Welfare OfficersExternal Link

Respectful Relationships

Respectful RelationshipsExternal Link

Head Start

Head Start apprenticeships and traineeshipsExternal Link

Middle Years Literacy and Numeracy Support

Middle Years Literacy and Numeracy Support InitiativeExternal Link


Reviewed 13 September 2023