education.vic.gov.au

Policy last updated

2 May 2024

Scope

  • Schools

Date:
September 2021

Policy

This policy applies to schools in the following areas:

  • Bayside Peninsula
  • Barwon
  • Brimbank Melton
  • Central Highlands
  • Goulburn
  • Inner Gippsland
  • Loddon Campaspe
  • Mallee
  • North Eastern Melbourne
  • Outer Eastern Melbourne
  • Ovens Murray
  • Southern Melbourne
  • Western Melbourne.

This includes 12 supported inclusion schoolsExternal Link . The Program for Students with Disability (PSD)External Link process will remain unchanged for schools in all other areas.

Policy

This policy outlines the Disability Inclusion Profile (the profile) and surrounding process that is designed to help schools and families identify the strengths, needs, and educational adjustments schools can make for individual students.

The Program for Students with Disabilities (PSD) remains in place for all other areas.

Summary

Details

The Disability Inclusion Profile (DOCX)External Link and surrounding process helps schools and families identify the strengths, functional needs, and educational adjustments schools make to assist students with disability and additional learning needs.

The profile is part of the department’s Disability Inclusion reformExternal Link , which aims to strengthen inclusive education across the school system. Refer to Disability Inclusion Funding and Support for information on the Disability Inclusion funding model and roll-out schedule. To learn more about the Disability Inclusion vision for inclusion, refer to Vision for inclusive education (PPTX)External Link .

The Disability Inclusion Profile (the profile) uses a strength and functional needs based approach that is designed to:

  • highlight the student’s strengths, aspirations and goals
  • help schools and families identify functional needs and adjustments for students with disability
  • inform individual education plans (IEPs), student learning goals, and school-wide planning
  • determine Disability Inclusion tier 3 student-level funding allocations to support schools to deliver adjustments for individual students with complex and high needs.

What are functional needs?

Functional needs are the adjustments a person requires to enable them to participate in activities on the same basis as their peers. For the purpose of the Disability Inclusion Profile, participation refers to involvement in activities in an educational environment.

What is a reasonable adjustment?

An adjustment is a measure or action taken to assist students to participate in education and training on the same basis as their peers without a disability.

All students have the potential to learn and the right to participate in a learning environment that is committed to supporting their educational development and genuine participation, including students with complex communication needs.

Adjustments can be student-specific or school-wide.

Under both state and Commonwealth laws schools must make ‘reasonable adjustments’ to accommodate students with disability.

Refer to: Students with Disability, Supporting information guidance for schools (DOCX)External Link and School-wide adjustments guidance (DOCX)External Link for further information.

Disability Inclusion Profile overview

The profile and the Disability Inclusion funding model will gradually replace the Program for Students with Disabilities (PSD). As schools transition to Disability Inclusion, the profile process will replace the current PSD application process, including the use of the Educational Needs Questionnaire.

The Disability Inclusion Facilitator Service (DIFS or facilitator service) administers the profile. To manage the profile process, schools use an online platform called the DIFS Portal. The DIFS Portal allows schools to request, view and upload information and engage with the facilitator service. Schools can seek access to the DIFS Portal by contacting DIFS on contact@difs.com.au. Refer to: the DIFS Portal User Guide (PDF)External Link .

Schools need to prepare for, co-ordinate and participate in the profile, with parent/carer(s) and the student, where appropriate to receive Disability Inclusion tier 3 student-level funding. Refer to: Tier 3 student-level funding.

Schools must make reasonable adjustments to ensure that students with disability can access and participate in education on the same basis as students without disability, regardless of the availability of additional funding. Refer to the Students with Disability Policy.

The profile is not compulsory for any student and requires consent from the student's parent/carer(s). The school, in partnership with the parent/carer(s), the student, and SSG are responsible for deciding whether to undertake a profile. Refer to: Identifying students to undertake a Disability Inclusion Profile.

Easy English resources are available to support parent/carer(s) understand the profile process (PDF)External Link and the profile meeting (PDF)External Link .

Overview of the profile process

The profile is available to schools in Bayside Peninsula, Barwon, Brimbank Melton, Central Highlands, Goulburn, Inner Gippsland, Loddon Campaspe, Mallee, North Eastern Melbourne, Outer Eastern Melbourne, Ovens Murray, Southern Melbourne, Western Melbourne areas, and 12 supported inclusion schools. A summary of the steps for schools to complete a profile is provided below. More detailed guidance is provided in the chapters within the Guidance tab.

1. Identify the student to undertake a profile

The school identifies a student to undertake the profile, in partnership with their parent/carer(s) and SSG. Access to the profile is not limited to only students who may be eligible for Tier 3 funding. Refer to: Identifying students to undertake a Disability Inclusion Profile.

2. Request a profile meeting with the facilitator service

The school requests a profile meeting with the facilitator service through the DIFS Portal. Refer to: Requesting a Disability Inclusion Profile meeting.

Schools are encouraged to contact their regional implementation team for advice and guidance before requesting their first 3 profile meeting requests. This will support schools through the profile process and minimise delays.

For students who have enrolled at a new school (for example, Prep/Foundation students or other new enrolments), tier 3 funding will be backdated for eligible students if a complete profile request is received within 2 terms of the student commencing at the school. Refer to: Requirements to submit a ‘complete profile request’External Link .

3. Demonstrate the student meets the requirements for a profile meeting

The school provides information to the facilitator service to demonstrate that the student meets the screening requirements for a profile meeting.

The facilitator service confirms the student meets the requirements for a profile. Refer to: Requesting a Disability Inclusion Profile meeting.

4. Gather and submit supporting information for the profile process

Once approved, the school gathers and submits information to support the profile meeting through the DIFS Portal. This includes a completed profile information form and the optional school-wide adjustment form (DOCX)External Link .

Refer to:

It is recommended that schools upload a maximum of 15 high-quality and relevant documents as supporting information to the DIFS Portal before the meeting. Schools are encouraged to upload the documents under the available categories within the Supporting Information Upload fields in the DIFS Portal. Refer to: the DIFS Portal User Guide (PDF)External Link .

Schools are encouraged to use the optional Profile Adjustments and Supporting Information Summary Tool (Profile ASIST) (DOCX)External Link to support the collation of supporting information.

Schools should consult with their regional disability coordinator, health wellbeing or student support services key contact before requesting a profile to discuss the documentation required to support a profile request.

Once supporting information has been uploaded, the profile request is considered complete for the purposes of accessing backdated funding.

5. Schedule the profile meeting

The facilitator service will work with the school to identify the most appropriate date and time for the profile meeting. Schools are then responsible for coordinating the attendance of profile meeting participants for the full duration of the meeting. Refer to: Scheduling a Disability Inclusion Profile meeting.

6. Prepare for the meeting

The school, in collaboration with the parent/carer(s) and student prepare for the profile meeting. Refer to: Preparing for a Disability Inclusion Profile meeting – roles and responsibilities.

The profile meeting is led by a trained facilitator. To prepare for the profile meetings, the facilitator will review core documentation. Schools should be able to talk about the supporting information at the profile meeting and connect it to the relevant activities within the profile. Refer to: Participating in a Disability Inclusion Profile meeting – roles and responsibilities.

A range of resources are available to support student and parent participation in the profile meeting. Refer to: Easy English resources.

7. Provide additional supporting information, if required

The facilitator service may request additional supporting information after the meeting.

If uncertain about the additional information request, schools may clarify with the facilitator service.

8. Receive finalised profile and school resource notification, if applicable via the DIFS Portal

The profile is finalised by the facilitator service.

The finalised profile informs tier 3 student-level funding allocations for individual students with complex and high needs.

The school receives a Disability Inclusion Profile report (profile report) and a School Resource Notification, that outlines any tier 3 student-level funding allocation. Refer to: Finalising the Disability Inclusion Profile, Notification of Disability Inclusion Profile outcome and the DIFS Portal User Guide (PDF)External Link .

9. Discuss the finalised report with the SSG

The school meets with the SSG to discuss the profile report and incorporate any learnings into the student’s IEP.

Disability Inclusion tier 3 student-level funding will be provided via the school’s Student Resource Package (SRP). Refer to: Steps following notification of Disability Inclusion Profile outcome.

The Disability Inclusion Profile meeting

The profile is completed through a structured meeting with the student’s student support group (SSG), which is led by a trained Disability Inclusion Facilitator (facilitator). During the meeting, the facilitator supports the SSG members to work together to complete the profile. This includes agreeing on the levels of adjustment needed for the student’s participation and learning at school. The Disability Inclusion Profile (DOCX)External Link structures this discussion.

The video below provides an example of how the profile meeting works, and the roles and responsibilities of attendees. A shorter version of this video for parent/carer(s) is available at Disability Inclusion: a new approach for students with disabilityExternal Link .

The Guidance tab provides more information on roles and responsibilities of profile meeting attendees.

Building school staff capability with the profile process

Schools are encouraged to:

  • review the content in the guidance tab of this policy page
  • schedule a practice profile meeting. Schools can submit a practice session request through the Disability Inclusion Facilitator ServiceExternal Link
  • speak with your regional implementation team (RIT), regional disability coordinator, health wellbeing or student support services key contact
  • access professional learning on Disability Inclusion, refer to: ArcExternal Link and Arc regional pages
  • complete the Disability Inclusion eLearning modules. These can be found by searching ‘Disability Inclusion’ in LearnED/edupay.

Timelines

Schools can request profile meetings for eligible students at any time, though there are recommendations around ideal timing for specific cohorts of students. Refer to: Identifying students to undertake a Disability Inclusion Profile and the Disability Inclusion reform principal checklist (PPTX)External Link .

It is recommended that profile meetings take place after the student has spent at least 10 weeks in the school environment. During this time, schools and students/families can identify, implement, and monitor appropriate adjustments to support the student’s needs. The recommendation for 10 weeks applies to all settings including primary, secondary and specialist settings. If a student is an existing student and adjustments have been in place for 10 weeks previously, schools do not need to wait 10 further weeks before submitting a profile request.

New students entering the Victorian government school system can access the profile prior to their commencement in school or early in their commencement year, where the student is receiving ongoing extensive or substantial support from an inclusion or disability support service. Tier 3 student-level funding for eligible students who have recently enrolled at a new school will be provided from the student’s date of enrolment if a completed profile request has been received by the facilitator service within 2 terms of the student commencing at the school. A complete profile request means that screening requirements, a completed profile information form and all supporting information is uploaded to the DIFS Portal within 2 terms of enrolment. The meeting does not have to be held within 2 terms. Refer to: Requirements to submit a ‘complete profile request’External Link .

Contact your regional implementation team, regional disability coordinator, health wellbeing key contact or student support services key contact for further support in identifying and prioritising students for profile meetings.

Transition timelines

Mainstream schools have 3 years from the commencement of profiles in their area to complete a profile for students who are eligible under PSD. This timeframe does not apply to specialist schools due to the concentration of students supported through the PSD in these settings.

Mainstream schools with a high concentration of students supported through the PSD and/or staff resourcing pressures can request an extended timeframe to complete their transition.

Contact your regional implementation team (details below) for further support with transition planning and refer to the Disability Inclusion reform principal checklist (PPTX)External Link for a guide to implementation.

The Disability Inclusion Facilitator Service (the facilitator service)

The facilitator service delivers parts of the profile process, including the facilitator role. These services are delivered by Australian Healthcare Associates (AHA) on behalf of the department. AHA recruit and manage facilitators.

Relevant legislation

Contacts

For general queries about Disability Inclusion, contact: disability.inclusion@education.vic.gov.au

For queries relating to the profile process, requesting and scheduling profiles, and the status of existing profile requests, please contact the facilitator service:

For queries relating to profile outcomes, including the profile report and School Resource Notification and tier 3 funding allocations, timelines, or processes, contact: disability.inclusion.outcomes@education.vic.gov.au

For support with transitioning to the profile, contact your regional implementation team:

For queries relating to profiles for individual students, contact your regional disability coordinator, health and wellbeing or student support services key contact.

Feedback

The department is continually looking to improve and refine policies and processes. Should you have any feedback on the Disability Inclusion Profile or process please provide it to: disability.inclusion@education.vic.gov.au

To provide feedback on a specific facilitator or profile meeting, please contact the facilitator service: contact@difs.com.au


Guidance

Disability Inclusion Profile Guidelines

These guidelines contain the following chapters:

  • The purpose of a Disability Inclusion Profile meeting and process
  • Identifying students to undertake a Disability Inclusion Profile
  • Requesting a Disability Inclusion Profile meeting
  • Supporting information required for a Disability Inclusion Profile Process
  • Scheduling a Disability Inclusion Profile meeting
  • Preparing for a Disability Inclusion Profile meeting – roles and responsibilities
  • Participating in the Disability Inclusion Profile meeting – roles and responsibilities
  • Finalising the Disability Inclusion Profile
  • Notification of Disability Inclusion Profile outcome
  • Steps following notification of the Disability Inclusion Profile outcome
  • Requesting a subsequent Disability Inclusion Profile
  • Appealing a Disability Inclusion Profile outcome
  • Enrolment in specialist schools

The purpose of a Disability Inclusion Profile meeting and process

The purpose of a Disability Inclusion Profile meeting and process

The profile is a strengths-based tool used to identify a student’s strengths, needs, and the educational adjustments required to enable their participation at school. The profile is completed through a structured meeting with the student’s student support group (SSG) and led by a trained facilitator. During the profile meeting, the SSG will work through the sections of the Disability Inclusion Profile. The sections include:

  • student’s strengths, interests and motivations, aspirations and student voice
  • student’s functional needs, across 31 school related activities
  • adjustments to the learning environment.

The profile includes sections related to the student’s strengths and educational aspirations, their functional needs across a range of educational activities, and the adjustments required to enable them to participate in their education. The facilitator will support meeting participants to discuss and agree to the levels of adjustment (PDF)External Link being provided or required for the student to participate in each of the profile’s 31 educational related activities, across 6 functional needs domains. Refer to: Disability Inclusion Profile (DOCX)External Link . The facilitator will ask participants to identify the order in which they would prefer to work through the profile.

The profile and surrounding process provides the SSG with a deeper understanding of a student’s functional needs and the supports required to meet those needs. A SSG is most appropriate for working through the profile as it brings together the people with the most knowledge of the student and their schooling.

This process can help schools improve individual education planning for the student and school-wide planning for all students who require adjustments. The outcomes of the profile meeting will also inform Disability Inclusion tier 3 student-level funding allocations for students with high needs.

Schools will need to prepare for, co-ordinate, and participate in the profile process, with parent/carer(s), to receive Disability Inclusion tier 3 student-level funding. Refer to: Tier 3 student-level funding.

The Disability Inclusion Profile in secondary schools factsheet (DOCX)External Link is available to support secondary schools participate in the process.

Holding a Disability Inclusion Profile meeting

Profile meetings should be held face-to-face at the student’s school. However, a school and family can opt for a virtual/remote profile meeting if this is preferred. Refer to: Disability Inclusion Profile – conducting a meeting by video/teleconferencing (DOCX)External Link .

Part or all of a profile meeting can be held outdoors on school grounds if this supports family participation. Schools should discuss this with the facilitator service to ensure facilitators are prepared for holding the meeting outdoors. Under exceptional circumstances, profile meetings can be conducted in an alternate/third-party location. Schools should contact their regional disability coordinator and facilitator service to discuss this prior to arranging the meeting.

Facilitator role

The Disability Inclusion Facilitator Service (facilitator service) has been established to deliver parts of the profile process, including the facilitator role. This service, delivered by Australian Healthcare Associates (AHA) on behalf of the department, will receive requests for profile meetings from schools, work with schools to schedule meetings, provide a facilitator for the meeting, and prepare a profile report for the school and family.

Facilitators are experienced allied health professionals and/or teachers with expertise, qualifications, or training in inclusive education. Facilitators are trained in administering the profile in schools.

A trained facilitator will support schools and families to work together to complete the profile in a specially convened meeting. To prepare for the profile meetings, the facilitator will review key documentation, such as the IEP and SSG minutes. Schools should be able to talk about the supporting information at the profile meeting and connect it to the relevant activities within the profile. Facilitators will guide the SSG through the profile sections and consider the information provided at the meeting, as well as relevant supporting information, to finalise the profile and develop the profile report.

In finalising the profile, facilitators will consider the information discussed in the meeting as well as relevant supporting information provided prior to the meeting. Schools should share all relevant information in the meeting, as only information shared with the full student support group will inform level of adjustments. At times facilitators may request additional supporting information to confirm what was discussed in the meeting. In this case, only the documents requested by the facilitator should be uploaded. Any additional documents that were not discussed in the meeting or requested by the facilitator after the meeting cannot be considered. For example, a facilitator cannot consider the adjustments outlined in a Behaviour Support Plan if this document was not discussed in the meeting and explicitly requested after the meeting. Refer to: Finalising the Disability Inclusion Profile.

Once the profile has been finalised it cannot be reopened again to consider additional supporting information.

Facilitators are unable to tour a school, visit classrooms or observe a student.

Disability Inclusion Profiles for students attending 2 schools (dual enrolment)

For students attending 2 schools (dual enrolment), one profile meeting should be held for the student. The facilitator will complete one profile for the student that covers both schools.

The school with the greater time fraction should submit the profile request and identify in the online request that the student attends two schools/is dual enrolled. Refer to: Requesting a Disability Inclusion Profile meeting.

Representatives, including the principal or principal’s nominee and relevant teacher(s), from both schools should attend the meeting. Refer to: Participating in the Disability Inclusion Profile meeting – roles and responsibilities. A profile preparation tool (DOCX)External Link is available to support schools in collecting information about the student from multiple teachers and other relevant staff, including in different school settings.

The SSG will be asked to reach consensus on the level of adjustment based on the adjustments in place in both settings. Supporting information from both settings will be required to demonstrate the adjustments in place to support the student. Refer to: Supporting information guidance for schools (DOCX)External Link .

Should the student be eligible for tier 3 funding, one tier 3 allocation will be provided pro-rata to the schools, based on the student’s enrolment across the 2 schools. Refer to: Tier 3 student-level funding.

Disability Inclusion Profiles for students attending satellite campuses

Satellite campuses should follow the process (either Program for Students with Disabilities (PSD) or Disability Inclusion) of the base (or main) school, regardless of the campus location. For example, for students based in campuses outside the current Disability Inclusion roll-out areas, but the base school is in a Disability Inclusion roll-out area, Disability Inclusion Profiles processes are in place.

Students transitioning/moving schools

Completing the profile process is the responsibility of the school that the student is attending when the profile is held. This means that if a student moves to another Victorian government school, the new school will be responsible for completing the profile process. This includes when a student transitions from a primary school to a secondary school. The outgoing and incoming school should discuss the status of the profile request and agree to a plan for progressing through the profile process. Either school can contact the facilitator service to arrange for the profile request to be transferred to the student’s new school. The facilitator service will advise both schools of their responsibilities and next steps for both schools to complete the profile process.


Identifying students to undertake a Disability Inclusion Profile

Identifying students to undertake a Disability Inclusion Profile

Existing students in Victorian government schools can access the profile where the student:

If a student is an existing student and adjustments have been in place for 10 weeks previously, schools do not need to wait 10 further weeks before submitting a profile request.

New students entering the Victorian government school system can access the profile prior to their commencement in school or early in their commencement year where the student is receiving ongoing support from an inclusion or disability support service. Refer to the section below: New students entering the Victorian government school systemExternal Link .

Undertaking a profile meeting is not compulsory for any student. Schools, in partnership with the SSG and parent/carer(s) determine whether to undertake the process.

The profile is not limited to students who are eligible for tier 3 student-level funding. It is available to and may benefit a broader group of students that meet the requirements set out above. Refer to: Tier 3 student-level funding.

Once the SSG has agreed to request a profile meeting, the school is responsible for requesting the meeting and managing the process with the facilitator service. Refer to: Requesting a Disability Inclusion Profile meeting.

Certain students with disability should be treated with priority, including:

  • students with disability in statutory out-of-home care, in accordance with the partnering agreement between the Department of Education and the Department of Families, Fairness and Housing (DFFH)
  • students with disability who are Koorie
  • students with a deteriorating medical condition.

Refer to the Supporting Students in Out-of-Home Care policy and the Koorie Education policy.

Definition of disability and classification of supplementary, substantial, and extensive adjustments

To access the profile, existing students in Victorian government schools are required to have received supplementary, substantial or extensive levels of adjustments, as per the definitions provided in the Nationally Consistent Collection of Data on School Students with Disability (NCCD)External Link , to enable participation in learning due to disability. These adjustments must be in place for a period of at least 10 weeks prior to a profile meeting, or 10 weeks cumulatively over the past 12 months (as noted in the requirements above). If a student is an existing student and adjustments have been in place for 10 weeks previously, schools do not need to wait 10 further weeks before submitting a profile request.

A diagnosis of disability is not required to access the profile and there are no mandatory assessments or reports required to prove eligibility for a profile meeting.

For the purposes of the profile process, disability is defined in accordance with the Disability Discrimination Act 1992 (Cth)External Link (DDA) and Disability Standards for Education 2005 (Cth)External Link (the Standards). This is a broad definition and includes intellectual, mental and physical impairments and behaviours that are a symptom or manifestation of the disability. The Standards apply to all students with disability.

This broad definition includes loss of bodily functions, damage to bodily functions, disease or illness, and disorders of thought processes, emotions, judgement or behaviour. It also includes an imputed disabilityExternal Link . The Standards apply to all students with disability.

Adjustments can be student-specific or school-wide. The frequency, intensity and personalisation of adjustments increases through the levels of adjustment. Refer to: Supporting information guidance for schools (DOCX)External Link and School-wide adjustments guidance (DOCX)External Link for further information.

This definition is also used as part of the NCCD process.

Nationally Consistent Collection of Data on Students with Disability

The NCCD is an annual collection of information about the adjustments that Australian schools make for students with disability. Schools can use the NCCD to help in identifying students to undertake the profile. The NCCD process supports schools to classify adjustments into 4 levels:

  • quality differentiated teaching practice
  • supplementary
  • substantial
  • extensive.

The NCCD also allows schools to determine the broad category of disability for each student from one of four categories:

  • physical
  • cognitive
  • sensory
  • social/emotional.

For more information on the NCCD, refer to: Nationally Consistent Collection of Data on School Students with Disability.

Refer to: Notification of Disability Inclusion Profile outcome for more information on how the Disability Inclusion Profile can inform the NCCD for schools.

New students entering the Victorian government school system

For new students entering the Victorian government school system (for example, prep students or students transferring from other school systems), schools should work with families, students, and other professionals to support a smooth and positive transition to school. For prep/foundation students, this will build upon information and approaches identified in the student’s transition learning and development statementExternal Link . Refer to: Transition – Early Childhood to School.

New students entering the Victorian government school system can access the profile prior to their commencement in school or early in their commencement year in cases where the student is receiving ongoing extensive or substantial support from an inclusion or disability support service.

Evidence of ongoing support from an inclusion or disability support services can include one or more of the following sources:

  • written medical advice/personal care advice from the student’s treating medical and/or allied health practitioners
  • National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS) progress report (existing) and assessments from a therapy/disability service provider – from the last 24 months
  • goals within a kindergarten inclusion support plan
  • a record of involvement/service from a specialist or disability service provider. This may include, for example, allied health professionals and the preschool field officers program for kindergarten children with additional needs, disability health and wellbeing programs. This can also include students with documented high functional needs transferring from other jurisdictions or Catholic and Independent sectors.

Where a profile meeting is scheduled prior to the student commencing at their new school, evidence of adjustments provided in another setting will be requested by the facilitator service to support the profile process. Provision of such documents must be made in accordance with the department’s Enrolment policy. This may include:

  • equivalent of an IEP or other planning documentation from another setting
  • equivalent of SSG minutes from another setting
  • documents containing information related to the student’s learning and development, such as the transition learning and development statementExternal Link for students transitioning from early childhood to school or an early ABLES learning report for the student in their new learning context. This evidence may be provided ahead of or during the meeting.

Note, the profile works best when it is completed in the learning context that the student requires adjustments for. A profile completed for a student when they are in preschool, another school, or home setting may not accurately capture the student’s needs in the school they are transitioning to, as the new school environment will differ from that of the previous setting.

Establishing a new student support group and developing an individual education plan

Where a SSG does not exist for a participating student (for example, a new enrolment), the school is required to establish one. Refer to: Student Support Groups policy.

A school will need to work with the SSG to develop an IEP. Refer to: Individual Education Plans (IEPs) policy.

Timelines for undertaking the Disability Inclusion Profile

Schools can request a profile meeting at any time for students that meet the requirements set out above.

Schools should start requests for profile meetings in Term 1 and Term 2 for students who may be eligible for tier 3 student-level funding. Refer to: Tier 3 student-level funding. For a suggested overview of the process across 3 years refer to: Disability Inclusion reform principal checklist (PPTX)External Link .

Disability Inclusion regional implementation teams and other area workforces are also available to support schools to identify and prioritise students for profile meetings throughout the school year.

For students who have enrolled at a new school, tier 3 funding will be backdated for eligible students if a complete profile request is received within 2 terms of student enrolment. A complete profile request means that screening requirements, a completed profile information form and all supporting information is uploaded to the DIFS Portal within 2 terms of enrolment. Completing the screening questions alone will not meet the eligibility criteria for backdated funding. The meeting does not have to be held within 2 terms.

A complete profile request is confirmed when the school receives an email from DIFS with the following subject line: ‘Disability Inclusion Profile – supporting information approved: Complete profile request’.

International students

International students (including asylum seekers and refugees) can access a Disability Inclusion Profile on the same basis as other Victorian government school students. The profile request can be submitted once a current enrolment is in place. For information about international student enrolment processes refer to: International Student Program.

For international fee paying students, any Tier 3 funding will be allocated to the school the student attends separately to the Student Resource Package.

Students turning 19 or 20

The profile process is available to students turning 19 or 20 if they are enrolled in a Victorian government school. Schools must refer to the age eligibility and approval requirements for government schools. Refer to the Enrolment policy.

Schools are referred to the guidelines, form and timelines for this group of students available at: Students with Disability.


Requesting a Disability Inclusion Profile meeting

Requesting a Disability Inclusion Profile meeting

Once the student support group (SSG) has agreed to request a profile meeting, the school is responsible for requesting a meeting via the Disability Inclusion Facilitator Service Portal (DIFS Portal). DIFS can be contacted via:

For schools planning to submit 5 or more profile requests at a time, schools should use the bulk profile request form (XLSX)External Link . Schools can contact DIFS (see above) to discuss this option.

Important: Schools are encouraged to contact their regional implementation team for advice and guidance before their first 3 profile meeting requests. Refer to Disability Inclusion Profile – key contacts and resources (DOCX)External Link . This will ensure that schools have the information and preparation they need to engage smoothly in the profile process and minimise delays.

Submitting a Disability Inclusion Profile request

To commence the profile process, schools will be required to submit a profile request through the DIFS Portal. Refer to the DIFS Portal User Guide (PDF)External Link .

Using the portal, schools should advise the facilitator when the profile request is for a student with a deteriorating medical condition(s), a Koorie student or a student in out-of-home care. For students with deteriorating medical conditions, schools should seek support from their regional disability inclusion coordinator.

Once the request has been submitted, the school will need to complete screening questions to determine if the student meets the requirements for a profile. The school should complete these screening questions and provide a response as quickly as possible to the facilitator service through the DIFS Portal. Delays in providing this information may lead to delays in the scheduling of a profile meeting. Refer to: the DIFS Portal User Guide (PDF)External Link .

If a school is planning to submit a profile request but waiting until they have 10 weeks of supporting information on adjustments and supports, the school should complete and collate the screening documents ahead of time. In some situations, a school may choose to submit a profile request before completing 10 weeks of adjustments in the school setting. This may be because they have other supporting information that demonstrates both the student’s high functional needs and previous adjustments and supports that have been provided and shown to be effective. This may streamline the scheduling of the profile meeting and will allow for a meeting to be booked in to coincide with when all supporting information is collected.

Additionally, if a student is an existing student and adjustments have been in place for 10 weeks previously. Schools do not need to wait 10 further weeks before submitting a profile request.

Screening requirements for a Disability Inclusion Profile meeting for a student currently enrolled in a Victorian government school

For students currently enrolled in a Victorian government school, the following information will be requested at the screening questions stage by the facilitator service:

  • a completed and scored Vineland-3 for the student (completed within 12 months of the request date)
  • a signed consent form from the student’s parent/carer(s)
  • a current individual education plan (IEP) (updated in the past 3 months)
  • SSG minutes (from the most recent meeting and any historical minutes).

Schools will also need to declare that the student will, or has received, supplementary, substantial or extensive adjustments, as per the definitions provided in the Nationally Consistent Collection of Data on School Students with Disability (NCCD) for a period of at least 10 weeks cumulatively over the past 12 months.

Screening requirements for a Disability Inclusion Profile meeting for a new student due to commence in a Victorian government school

For new students due to commence in a Victorian government school, the following information will be requested at the screening questions stage by the facilitator service to process the request:

  • a completed and scored Vineland-3 for the student (completed within 12 months of the request date)
  • evidence of ongoing support from one or more inclusion or disability support services
  • a signed consent form from the parent/carer(s).

Refer to: New students entering the Victorian government school system.

The Vineland-3 assessment must include the name and position/role of the scoring practitioner.

In addition, other supporting information such as an equivalent document to an IEP or other planning documents, the equivalent of SSG minutes from another setting, or other documents such as a transition and learning development statementExternal Link for kindergarten children can be uploaded at this time, with appropriate parent/carer(s) consent.

If this documentation cannot be obtained by the parent/carer(s) or new school, the new school should contact the facilitator service for support.

Please note that screening requirements are an initial step before the facilitator service requests the supporting information and profile information form. In the context of determining a ‘complete’ profile request, and eligibility for backdated funding of new enrolments, the screening requirements alone will not be sufficient. Refer to: Requirements to submit a ‘complete profile request’External Link .

Schools may request all relevant information from parent/carer(s), including healthcare information required for a profile request in accordance with the department’s Privacy and Information Sharing Policy.

Schools must obtain consent from the student’s parent/carer(s), or the adult/mature minor student before requesting a profile meeting. This must be provided when schools make the profile request. The signed form should be kept on the student’s file.

The consent form (DOCX)External Link can be signed by any of the following people:

  • a parent or other person with parental responsibility for ‘major long-term issues’ as defined by the Family Law Act 1975 (Cth) or the Children, Youth and Families Act 2005 (Vic). For students in statutory out-of-home care, check the authorisation instrument from the Department of Families, Fairness and Housing (DFFH) to establish whether the carer can sign the consent form. If in doubt, check with the DFFH case manager or LOOKOUT
  • if none of the above people are available, an informal carer may sign this form if the student is in an informal care arrangement and the parent is unavailable. An informal carer is a relative or other responsible adult with whom the child lives and who has day to day care of the student
  • a student over the age of 18 years
  • a student who the principal considers to be a mature minor for the purposes of making the decision to receive the services.

Schools must not edit or make changes to the consent form.

For guidance on decision making responsibilities for students, including for students with informal and formal care arrangements, such as students in statutory out-of-home care, refer to the Decision Making Responsibilities for Students Policy. Informal carers should sign an Informal Carer Statutory Declaration (PDF)External Link to confirm their status, in addition to the consent form.

While the consent form requires only one signature, where reasonably possible schools should seek consent from all parents or carers who have decision-making responsibilities for the student or who will have relevant information to provide at the profile meeting. Where there is a dispute between those responsible for whether the child should undertake a profile, the best interests of the child or young person should be considered.

In these circumstances principals are encouraged to seek advice from the department’s Legal Division.

Where schools are unable to obtain parent/carer consent for the profile process but nevertheless consider a profile meeting would be in the best interests of the student, principals are encouraged to consider the following:

If schools are still unable to obtain parent/carer consent principals are encouraged to seek advice from the department’s Legal Division.

Important: Parent/carer consent is not necessary if the student is a mature minor for the purposes of consenting to the profile process. Refer to the Mature Minors and Decision Making policy.

Relevant contacts

Legal Division – principals may seek legal advice from the department’s Legal Division about decision making responsibilities for students:

Privacy – schools may contact the department's Privacy Team for advice when seeking student’s personal health information:

Disability Inclusion Facilitator Service:

Inclusive Education Division – for general enquiries, schools may contact: disability.inclusion@education.vic.gov.au

Completing a Vineland-3 assessment

A completed and scored Vineland-3 Teacher Form Comprehensive Version for the student is required as part of the profile request. This must include the name and position/role of the scoring practitioner.

The school can either:

  • request a Vineland-3 assessment be completed and scored by their health and wellbeing or student support services key contact or through the school’s local student support services team
  • complete and score a Vineland-3 assessment within the school if the school has a staff member who is registered with PearsonExternal Link and has an undergraduate, masters or doctorate qualification in a relevant field (see below).

Relevant qualifications for the staff member completing and scoring the Vineland-3 assessment include special education or social work, speech language therapy, occupational therapy, physiotherapy, psychiatry or paediatrics.

Fields of study must be closely related to the intended use of the assessment, and must include formal training in the ethical administration, scoring, and interpretation of clinical assessments. School-based staff who have completed Pearson’s User Level B accreditation must be supervised for scoring and reporting of User Level B practice assessments from an existing User Level B or C (who have at least 6 to 12 months’ experience using User Level B assessments) to ensure their administration and practice of assessment usage is accurate.

A pre-existing Vineland can also be submitted if it was completed within 12 months of the date the profile was requested (refer to 'Pre-existing Vineland-3' section below).

All students are required to complete the Vineland-3 as part of the Disability Inclusion Profile process.

Schools who require a Vineland-3 assessment only for the purpose of a profile will need to make this request via the Student Online Case System (SOCS)External Link – noting ‘Vineland for the purpose of DI’. Schools will need to ensure that DI parent/carer consent has been received to request a Vineland-3 and upload the consent to SOCS at this time. Student support services consent is not required in addition for a Vineland only request.

Schools will be responsible for keeping results on the student’s school file.

Any other requests for support from student support services will follow existing referral pathways, including obtaining student support services consent.

Except for new student enrolments, the Teacher Form of the Vineland-3 must be completed by the teacher who knows the student best. The teacher must have known the student for at least 8 weeks.

A Vineland-3 parent/carer form is not permissible unless in exceptional circumstances, for example, where a student has been home schooled or in the case of school refusal resulting in significant absences from school. A parent/carer form may be completed for some students for other purposes, for example diagnostic assessment. These students will also need a Vineland-3 Teacher Form Comprehensive Version completed for them. If the school is uncertain about this process, they may discuss with the facilitator service.

The completed Vineland-3 is scored by the eligible school-based practitioner or the student support services team. To mitigate potential conflicts of interest, the respondent completing the Vineland-3 cannot be the individual who scores it.

Schools may not re-submit any Vineland-3 assessment which has been re-scored.

The professional who scores the form is not required to complete a report. The score may be provided to the school in the form of a statement in an email. This should include the name and position/role of the scoring practitioner. All calculated standard scores are required to be provided (Adaptive Behaviour Composite Score and the Domain Standard Scores) as part of the profile request. Schools must retain a copy on the student’s confidential student services file.

Vineland-3 for pre-prep students

For prep students due to undertake the profile prior to commencing school, as per current practice, schools may also ask kindergarten teachers to complete the Teacher Form of a Vineland assessment. If this is not possible, another practitioner who has provided service to the student, for example an early childhood intervention professional or disability support worker, may complete the Teacher form of the Vineland-3.

Pre-existing Vineland-3

If a Vineland-3 Teacher Form Comprehensive Version has been completed within 12 months of the date the profile was requested a new Vineland-3 is not required. The existing score can be provided as supporting information at the time of the profile request. Parent/carer(s) consent will need to be obtained to enable this score to be used for Vineland-3 reports not held by the school.

Facilitator service approves Disability Inclusion Profile screening questions

The facilitator service will confirm that the screening requirements are met.

The school will receive communication from the facilitator service with information about next steps, including providing supporting information and completing the profile information form in the DIFS Portal and the optional school-wide adjustment form (DOCX)External Link .

Requirements to submit a ‘complete profile request’

The profile meeting can only be scheduled once the profile request is completed. To submit a ‘complete profile request’ schools are required to:

  1. complete the screening requirementsExternal Link
  2. submit the completed profile information formExternal Link through the DIFS Portal
  3. upload all supporting information.

Following the receipt of all required information, the facilitator service will provide email confirmation that the profile request is complete. This email will have the following subject line: ‘Disability Inclusion Profile – supporting information approved: Complete profile request’.

Schools will be advised if the request requirements have not been met and the reason(s) for this. For students who have enrolled at a new school, tier 3 funding will be backdated for eligible students if a complete profile request (as defined above) is received within 2 terms of the student commencing at the school.

Disability Inclusion regional implementation teams and other area workforces are available to support the profile request process.


Supporting information required for the Disability Inclusion Profile

Supporting information required for the Disability Inclusion Profile

Principles of the supporting information guidance

The Disability Inclusion Profile meeting will discuss the student’s:

  • strengths and educational aspirations
  • functional needs across 6 domains and 31 educational activities
  • adjustments required to enable participation in their education.

The Functional Needs Domain Table (PDF)External Link summarises these 31 activities.

The facilitator will support meeting participants to discuss and agree to the ‘level of adjustment’ being provided or required for the student to participate in each of the profile’s 31 educational related activities. The Levels of Adjustment (PDF)External Link resource provides a description of each level.

Supporting information is used within the profile process to confirm that the level of adjustments identified accurately match the student’s functional needs, particularly for adjustments at the substantial or extensive level. In some cases, particularly when seeking to support the differentiated and supplementary levels of adjustment, no additional documentation will be required as a verbal description of the student’s characteristics and adjustments will be sufficient.

Schools are required to upload supporting information and complete the profile information form before a meeting. The profile request is considered complete for the purposes of accessing backdated funding when the screening requirements, supporting information and completed profile form have all been submitted. Refer to: Requirements to submit a ‘complete profile request’External Link .

It is recommended that schools upload a maximum of 15 individual documents as supporting information. When collating supporting information, schools should think critically about the quality and relevance of documentation they provide and ensure that it demonstrates the planning and implementation of adjustments. Schools should be able to talk to this at the profile meeting and connect it to the relevant activities within the profile.

The optional Profile Adjustments and Supporting Information Summary Tool (Profile ASIST) (DOCX)External Link is available to support schools to identify relevant and quality supporting information.

It is strongly encouraged that schools consult with their health and wellbeing or student support services key contact and/or regional disability coordinator prior to any initial profile request to ensure that supporting information relates to the specific levels of adjustment in the domains or activities identified.

Refer to the Supporting information guidance for schools (DOCX)External Link to identify and prepare key information for the profile.

Should the student be eligible for tier 3 funding, the student’s levels of adjustment across all 31 educational activities contribute to the tier 3 funding allocation. As such, schools should provide supporting information related to all relevant activities and domains within the profile. Refer to: Tier 3 student-level funding.

A flexible approach is taken to the supporting information requirements for eligibility for tier 3 – student level funding. This approach minimises the burden for schools and families in collating information. It seeks to understand the adjustments that are required for the student to participate in their education on the same basis as their peers.

Sources of supporting information

Supporting information should be documentation already held by the school. New documentation or clinical reports and assessments are generally not required. Documentation should demonstrate the planning and implementation of adjustments and show the intensity, frequency and personalisation of the adjustments in place to support a student.

Schools should ensure that their documentation of adjustments is of a high-quality – refer to the list of sources below that typically contain high-quality supporting information. Schools should consult with their regional disability coordinator, health wellbeing or student support services key contact before requesting a profile to discuss the documentation required to support a profile request.

The following types of supporting information can be provided to support the profile process:

  • information about both the school-wide and student-specific adjustments currently being provided to support the student
  • information on the implementation of these adjustments over time, including the intensity, frequency and personalisation of adjustments, and the student’s responsiveness to them.

School-wide adjustments include any adjustments, policies, facilities, resources and supports in place that are not specific to any one student. Schools can complete the optional school-wide adjustment form to share with facilitators their school policies, facilities, resources and supports. Refer to the School-wide adjustments guidance (DOCX)External Link .

Student-specific adjustments are adjustments in place to meet the specific needs of a student to participate at school.

The following sources of supporting information are typically the most useful for the profile process:

Schools must evaluate the relevance of student notes/records from educational management programs (such as COMPASS, SIMON, Seesaw or Google Classroom) for ‘need to know’ information regarding the adjustments in place for the student before providing this documentation. Such information is often not relevant to the profile process and may not meet the privacy requirements for the collection and use of student information. Any information provided must detail explicitly the adjustments in place. Whole excerpts or records showing behavioural concerns or presentations must not be provided.

Refer to the Supporting information guidance for schools (DOCX)External Link for further information.

For students in out-of-home-care (OOHC), an Educational Needs Analysis may also be provided as a source of supporting information.

Supporting information relevance and privacy considerations

Schools must not provide personal, sensitive or health information or documentation that is not directly relevant to the student’s disability or functional needs at school. Examples of supporting information that are not relevant and must not be submitted may include budget information relating to NDIS plans or documents disclosing details of abuse or trauma. Schools can share any relevant general context with the facilitator service. This will ensure the facilitator can support participation in the meeting. Contact DIFS on contact@difs.com.au for further information.

For more information, see: Privacy and Information Sharing

Collating and submitting supporting information

Following approval of a profile request screening requirements, schools are encouraged to work with parent/carer(s) to collate relevant supporting information, to be provided in addition to that provided at the request stage. If they have not done so already (refer to: Requesting a Disability Inclusion Profile meeting), schools are also encouraged to discuss the supporting information with their health and wellbeing or student support services key contact before the meeting.

Schools are required to upload supporting information via the DIFS Portal before the profile meeting. Refer to: the DIFS Portal User Guide (PDF)External Link . The facilitator service will be unable to accept hard copies of supporting information, including at the profile meeting.

It is recommended that schools upload a maximum of 15 documents as supporting information before the meeting. To avoid delays or confusion, schools must ensure that the file names of these documents are consistent and clearly describe the contents. The facilitator service may contact the school to request more supporting information, if limited documentation regarding the adjustments has been provided.

Schools can table additional documents during the profile meeting and these will be considered by the facilitator. If these documents are required to substantiate a level of adjustment, facilitators will request that these documents are uploaded after the profile meeting.

School documentation as supporting information

Profile information form

Schools must complete a profile information form as part of the profile request in the DIFS Portal. This form collects information about the student and details of SSG members that will attend the profile meeting. Refer to: the DIFS Portal User Guide (PDF)External Link .

Once the profile information form and supporting information is provided, the profile request is considered completeExternal Link for the purposes of accessing backdated funding.

Optional school-wide adjustments form

Schools can also complete an optional, but strongly recommended, school-wide adjustment form (DOCX)External Link . The facilitator service will send this form to schools when requesting supporting information. This form gives schools the opportunity to outline all the adjustments, policies, resources, facilities and supports they have in place for all students with disability.

The facilitator service will keep a record of this form to use for future profile meetings held at your school. Schools only need to provide this form once, though schools may wish to revisit this form periodically.

For more information, refer to the School-wide adjustments guidance (DOCX)External Link .

Disability Inclusion and supporting information produced by NDIS funded therapists

Disability Inclusion funding is not related to a student’s eligibility for supports under the National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS).

Many students who have a profile meeting will also participate in the NDIS. Documentation provided by the parent/carer(s) regarding NDIS supports may be provided for the profile process, however, its use or consideration is not mandatory and it is not a substitute for school-based documents.

Supporting information regarding the work of specialists provided for the profile may include:

  • a copy of a NDIS plan
  • any therapy reports, assessment reports or progress reports produced by an NDIS funded therapist.

There is no need for NDIS funded therapists to produce additional or new documentation for use in the profile process.

The Disability Inclusion Profile processes are separate from the NDIS and the outcome of the profile meeting is not related to a student’s eligibility for supports under the NDIS. NDIS participants are not compelled to disclose their participation in the NDIS. If a student is an NDIS participant, they may choose to self-report this to the school.

Parent/carer(s), pending agreement from the school, can invite people that are involved with their child through the NDIS to the profile meeting, including:

  • NDIS funded therapists
  • local area coordinators
  • early childhood professionals, such as an early childhood teacher and allied health.

The role of these attendees in profile meetings is to support the discussion of adjustments and supports within their scope of practice of expertise.
For more information refer to Participating in the Disability Inclusion Profile Meeting – roles and responsibilities.

Students with low attendance

In progressing the profile for students with low or no attendance, schools may provide information and documentation that demonstrates the adjustments, re-engagement activities and monitoring and future planning for students with low attendance. Facilitators will apply a flexible approach when reviewing this documentation, noting that more emphasis may be placed on the effort of the school in planning for school attendance and re-engagement activities.

Digital supporting information

Digital supporting information (such as videography and photography) can be provided as part of the profile process. Digital supporting information may be helpful to have a visual representation of adjustments, where it cannot be demonstrated through formal documents. Digital supporting information should not replace other kinds of school-based documentation and should not be used to demonstrate a student’s functioning, presentation, challenging behaviour or to highlight their disability.

Any provision of digital supporting information must be consistent with consent provided by parents for use of photos, videos and images of the student and needs to align with the department’s Photographing, Filming and Recording Students Policy requirements and your school’s local policy.

Third-party software, programs or applications used for collating student information

No third-party software, programs or applications have been accredited by the department for use as part of the Disability Inclusion Profile process. There are a range of risks related to the use of such software, programs of applications, including related to child safety, records management and privacy.

Should schools wish to use any software, programs of applications they are free to do so. However, any use must be compliant with all relevant legislative requirements, including those that relate to child safety, records management and privacy.

Use of third-party software, programs of applications must be approved by the school’s principal and a Privacy Impact Assessment must be completed. Refer to Privacy and Information Sharing: Privacy impact assessments.

Ideally, schools should have in place a contract with the software, programs or applications to ensure appropriate use of private, personal and health information.

In deciding to use any software, programs or applications schools should weigh a range of factors including the potential benefits and financial costs to the school and whether alternative solutions exist.

Refer to the Privacy and Information Sharing Policy.

Supporting information from specialists and school-based experts, including Health, Wellbeing, and Inclusion Workforces

The profile can be supported by professionals who provide evidence-based advice and guidance that enables schools to effectively implement appropriate adjustments to support students in the school environment. These professionals include specialists and school-based experts.

Specialists are those who have qualifications with the capability and competency to implement and/or recommend supports and adjustments within their field of expertise. Examples may include Health, Wellbeing, and Inclusion Workforces (HWIW) (see below), medical or allied health practitioners, or teachers with additional qualifications in specific curriculum areas or inclusion and wellbeing.

School-based experts are those with other experience, capability and competency that enables them to use current and high-quality evidence to implement and/or recommended supports and adjustments that align with their area of expertise. School-based experts are not required to hold a formal leadership role. Examples may include teachers with extensive experience in a specific school-based activity, learning specialists, or teachers who occupy disability inclusion coordinators and school-based mentor roles.

Specialists and school-based experts must hold expertise that aligns with the school-based activity to which they are contributing.

In some circumstances, such as where there is a safety risk to the student, a specialist with the appropriate qualifications will be required to contribute to supporting information for a profile. Facilitators will advise where this is the case. As an example, for students with swallowing difficulties that result in a risk of aspiration or choking, their supporting information must be informed by a medical practitioner and/or speech pathologist.

The department’s HWIW are considered specialists and should have their involvement demonstrated in supporting information for students undertaking the profile.

HWIW comprise:

Mental health practitioners are also considered specialists where their area of expertise aligns with specific activities.

More information on the role of specialists and school-based experts, including HWIW, in providing supporting information is detailed in the Supporting information guidance for schools (DOCX)External Link .

Specialists/school-based experts and supporting information

The involvement of specialists and school-based experts in supporting students can be demonstrated in the supporting information held and submitted by the school. At times, specialists and school-based experts may provide additional supporting information that is separate to school documents. This may include a formal report or a record of specialist involvement. These should be provided to the school to collate with other supporting information. Schools are responsible for co-ordinating the submission of all supporting information to the facilitator service.

In the case of private specialists (including those working through the NDIS), schools will need to work with the parent/carer(s) to provide consent/release of this information to share with the school. Refer to: Supporting information guidance for schools (DOCX)External Link .


Scheduling a Disability Inclusion Profile meeting

Scheduling a Disability Inclusion Profile meeting

Organise a Disability Inclusion Profile meeting date and time with the Disability Inclusion Facilitator Service

The Disability Inclusion Facilitator Service (DIFS or facilitator service) will work with schools to book a profile meeting at an agreed date and time.

The profile meeting is a specially convened meeting of the student support group (SSG). The meeting will last for around 90 minutes.

Profile meetings will be held during school hours or just outside of school hours.

Organise participants to attend a Disability Inclusion Profile meeting

Once a profile meeting has been booked, schools are responsible for coordinating the attendance of profile meeting participants for the full 90 minutes.

When organising profile meetings, participants, including families, should be aware that as schools and facilitators build familiarity with the profile and the process initial meetings are sometimes running longer than 90 minutes.

Undertaking a profile practice session prior to requesting a profile meeting is strongly encouraged to build fluency and efficiency in the process. Schools are also encouraged to discuss individual students with their area teams (regional disability coordinator, health and wellbeing or student support services key contact) prior to lodging a profile request with the facilitator service.

Schools are also encouraged to complete the Disability Inclusion eLearning modules. These can be found by searching ‘Disability Inclusion' in LearnED, available from eduPay.

Required profile meeting attendees

The profile meeting must include the following people:

  • the facilitator
  • the student, in person where possible and appropriate, and if not, their views should be captured and represented (refer to below)
  • the student’s parent/carer(s) and/or Department of Families, Fairness and Housing (DFFH) worker (refer to below)
  • the teacher or teachers who have the best knowledge of the student (refer to below)
  • the school principal or principal’s nominee.

For students in OOHC, the school should also invite the student’s Learning Mentor.

For Koorie students, schools, in consultation with parent/carer(s) and family, may wish to include representatives from the department’s Koorie Education Workforce.

When organising participants to attend, schools should be mindful of only inviting people that will be able to meaningfully contribute information about the student’s learning and the adjustments required to enable their participation at school. Should the student attend the meeting, in full or in part, schools should also be mindful of inviting participants that the student would be comfortable communicating about their disability in front of, or, if not attending the meeting, be comfortable to have speaking on their behalf.

Refer to: Preparing for a Disability Inclusion Profile meeting – roles and responsibilities.

If the school principal does not attend the meeting, a nominee must attend in their place. The principal’s nominee must be a member of the school’s senior leadership team, such as the assistant principal, and have decision making authority around the planning and implementation of adjustments. Ultimately, the responsibility for implementation of reasonable adjustments lies with the principal. For example, in schools where an education support staff member typically administered/managed the PSD and is now leading the Disability Inclusion Profile, this person may attend the meeting, however, another member of the senior leadership team would also be required to attend. In limited circumstances, it may be appropriate for a leading teacher outside of the school’s senior leadership team to attend the profile meeting as the principal’s nominee, however this person must have decision making authority.

A department nominee (as per previous Program for Students with Disability requirements) is not required, as the facilitator will ensure the profile meeting is conducted according to department guidelines and all the required and available information is considered. However, a principal or the principal’s nominee may wish to record key information or actions from the meeting, including any additional supporting information that may be required. The school notes tool (DOCX)External Link is available to record this information.

School leaders will need to manage any complex family, court, custody or guardianship requirements in accordance with the department’s Decision Making Responsibilities for Students policy. Schools may contact the department’s Legal Division on 03 9637 3146 or email: legal.services@education.vic.gov.au

School leaders are also responsible for organising interpreters, including AUSLAN and deaf interpreters. Refer to the department's Interpreting and Translation Services policy for guidance on accessing these services.

Student participation and voice in the profile process

It is important that the student plays an active role in the profile process and contributes, where possible, directly or indirectly to the discussion, either in person or via a trusted adult. Student voice acknowledges that students have unique perspectives on learning, teaching, and schooling, and should have the opportunity to actively shape their own education. Decisions on how to include student voice in the process should be made on a student-by-student basis. Schools are encouraged to work with families and the student to determine the appropriate level and method of student participation.

Student participation could include:

  • attendance in the entire meeting
  • attendance in parts of the meeting (for example, the discussion around the student’s strengths and aspirations at the beginning of the meeting)
  • participation prior to the meeting (for example, with discussions with the student’s teacher, parent/carer(s), or other trusted adult)
  • other participation (for example, the student providing samples of their work or a video of them communicating their thoughts about their strengths, aspirations and needs). Refer to: student voiceExternal Link and AmplifyExternal Link .

Enabling student voice

The following resources are available to support and enable student voice in the profile process:

Parent/carer attendance

A student’s parent/carer(s) are essential members of the SSG and thus the profile meeting. Schools are responsible for ensuring that all reasonable efforts are made to facilitate a parent/carer(s) attendance at the profile meeting and that supports are offered where a parent/carer(s) may have difficulty attending the profile meeting.

Reasonable efforts to facilitate parent/carer(s) attendance include consulting with them as soon as possible about potential dates for the profile meeting, discussing what supports or adjustments they may require to attend and participate, and providing a reminder as the date of the profile meeting approaches. It is recommended that schools:

A profile meeting cannot proceed without the student’s parent/carer, DFFH worker and key school staff.

In exceptional circumstances and following discussion with the parent/carer(s), the parent/carer(s) can nominate, preferably in writing, someone else to attend the meeting in their place. This may include, for example, another relative or friend that knows the student well outside of school. A parent/carer(s) may attend the meeting virtually or by telephone if that would support their attendance. Refer to: Disability Inclusion Profile – conducting a meeting by video/teleconferencing (DOCX)External Link .

An exception can also be made if the student is deemed to be a mature minor for the purposes of this meeting and the decisions to be made therein and it would not be appropriate for the student’s parents/carer to be in attendance. Refer to the Mature Minors and Decision Making policy.

Attendance of all parties should be re-confirmed by the school prior to the scheduled profile meeting. If a profile meeting is cancelled due to key SSG members not being in attendance, there may be delays in arranging a new meeting. However, schools should endeavour to schedule the meeting as soon as reasonably practicable. Schools must contact the facilitator service if a meeting needs to be rescheduled or cancelled. They can be contacted on:

If after following the above guidance a parent/carer and/or nominated party refuses to attend or there are other extenuating circumstances, advice should be sought through the school’s regional office and/or the department’s Legal Division:

If on the day of the meeting, the parent/carer does not attend, the school should contact their Disability Inclusion regional disability coordinator to discuss whether it is appropriate and in the best interests of the student for the profile meeting to continue. The facilitator, in partnership with their team leader, will be able to support decision-making on whether the meeting should go ahead.

Teacher attendance

A teacher familiar with the student and who can talk to the adjustments in place to support the student must attend the profile meeting.

Prep students completing the profile prior to commencement at school

For prep students completing the profile prior to commencement at school, the profile meeting should include preschool teacher/s, preschool field officers or early intervention worker/s.

If possible, the student’s planned prep teacher should also attend.

Primary school students

For students in primary school, the student’s regular classroom teacher must attend the meeting.

Secondary school students

For students in secondary school, the teacher with the most interaction with and knowledge of the student should attend the profile meeting. This may be the student’s home group teacher, head of year-level, their English or Math teacher, or another teacher that works closely with the student, such as a teacher that delivers specialist/targeted interventions and adjustments. Secondary schools will need to ensure that input is received from all the student’s teachers ahead of the meeting if they are unable to attend the meeting.

It is best practice for the teacher that attends the profile meeting to gather information from the student’s other teachers so that they have a comprehensive understanding of the student’s functional needs, for example speaking to physical education teachers about mobility. A profile preparation tool (DOCX)External Link is available to support schools in collecting information about the student from multiple teachers, and other relevant staff including careers and wellbeing.

The Disability Inclusion Profile in secondary schools factsheet (DOCX)External Link has more specific information to support secondary schools understand and participate in the process.

Specialist school students

For students in specialist schools, the student’s regular teacher or their most frequent teacher must attend.

Dual enrolments

Where students attend 2 schools, for example, a mainstream setting and a specialist setting, teachers from both schools should attend.

Other considerations

In all settings, where appropriate and agreed by the family, additional teachers, beyond the student’s current teacher(s) may also attend.

For example, if the profile meeting is held toward the end of a school year, the student’s teacher for the next year may attend to help better understand the needs of the student. Conversely, if a profile meeting is occurring early in the school year, the student’s teacher from the previous year may also attend to contribute information about the student.

Note: All schools can use tier 2 school-level funding for casual relief teaching (CRT) coverage for staff to prepare for and participate in the profile meeting.

Refer to: Preparing for a Disability Inclusion Profile meeting – roles and responsibilities.

Additional participants

Additional participants must be agreed to by the school and the parent/carer(s). These may include, but are not limited to:

  • any other people who work with the student, such as social worker, disability support worker/NDIS worker, treating professional, allied health, medical professional, or Education Support Staff
  • an advocate (if the parent chooses to have one). An advocate cannot be paid to attend a profile meeting and would be expected to play a similar role as set out in the department's Student Support Groups policy.

Where required, schools should use the department’s provider, the Victorian Interpreting and Translating Service (VITS) LanguageLoop, as per the Interpreting and Translation Services policy. Refer to the Interpreting and Translation Services policy.

Information about the Disability Inclusion reform and profile are available in 33 community languagesExternal Link .

Schools should consult with the student’s parent/carer(s) about whether an interpreter would be appropriate and ensure that the family understands that no information will be passed back to the community through the interpreter. Particularly, sensitivity is required for refugee families where the interpreter may belong to the ethnic, political, or religious group that have been in conflict with the ethnic, political, or religious group of the student or their family/friends.

To ensure a productive meeting, schools should only invite people that can meaningfully contribute information about the students learning and the adjustments required to enable their participation at school.

Conflict of interest

When participating in the profile meeting, school participants should be mindful of any conflict-of-interest. Particular care is required when members of the SSG are required to take multiple roles (for example, a parent may also be a teacher or principal). In such cases, the school should put in place and document clear roles and responsibilities and risk mitigation strategies to manage this. Refer to: Conflict of Interest.

Advance information to assist facilitator preparation for Disability Inclusion Profile meeting

Schools are encouraged to flag any issues that may require additional preparation prior to the profile meeting with the facilitator service (either at the meeting request stage or by advising DIFS when the profile meeting is scheduled). Schools may wish to inform DIFS of issues such as:

  • a meeting participant requiring an interpreter or additional support to understand key concepts
  • complex family dynamics or historical context that the facilitator should be mindful of.

In flagging any such issues, schools must be mindful of confidentiality and privacy.

Requests to delay the scheduling of a Disability Inclusion Profile meeting

At times, schools may be unable to schedule or need to delay the scheduling of a profile meeting. If this occurs, schools should either withdraw the profile request or contact the facilitator service to advise that they wish to put the profile request 'on hold'.


Preparing for a Disability Inclusion Profile meeting – roles and responsibilities

Preparing for a Disability Inclusion Profile meeting – roles and responsibilities

School staff

The school principal or principal’s nominee, teachers, and other participating school staff are required to prepare for the profile meeting.

A profile preparation tool (DOCX)External Link is available to support schools preparing for a profile meeting. This tool has been developed specifically for secondary schools but can be used by all schools as needed.

Participating staff are encouraged to refer to the student voice tool to help them have a discussion with the student about their strengths, aspirations, and functional needs. Refer to: student voice tool (DOCX)External Link and inclusive student voice toolkit (DOCX)External Link .

Participating staff should review the Disability Inclusion Profile and other resources available in the Resources tab, and make notes ahead of the meeting where possible.

Principals or their nominees are also required to collate and upload any supporting information ahead of the profile meeting.

The principal or principal’s nominee should work with the student’s family to:

  • ensure they understand the purpose of the profile meeting
  • support them to prepare for (if relevant) and be able to participate in the meeting
  • help them understand what is involved and address any concerns they may have
  • help them explain the purpose of the meeting and how the meeting will work to the student.

Refer to: Disability Inclusion schools communications pack (DOCX)External Link (staff login required).

Parent/carer(s)

Preparation for the profile meeting is encouraged but not mandatory for the student’s parent/carer(s).

Parent/carer(s) already know so much about their child that enables them to meaningfully contribute to the discussion. However, families may spend time before the meeting thinking about their child’s strengths, aspirations, and functional needs.

Prior to the meeting parent/carer(s) can also nominate an advocate to support and/or represent them and their child, if required. All additional attendees must be agreed upon by the school and the parent/carer(s).

Parent/carer(s) are encouraged to refer to the parent voice tool (DOCX)External Link . Easy English resources are also available to support parent/carer(s) understand the profile process (PDF)External Link and the profile meeting (PDF)External Link .

Students

Student voice is an important part of the Disability Inclusion Profile process. It is important that the student plays an active role in the profile process and contributes directly or indirectly to the discussion, either in person or via a trusted adult.

Students may require support to participate in the profile meeting. Schools should consider the appropriate method and person to support students in this context. This may involve:

  • collaborating with staff and the student to plan how best to prepare the student to contribute to the meeting.
  • helping the student learn about what a profile meeting is, using mediums and communication strategies that are accessible and engaging for them. This could be through using visuals that explain the meeting, role-playing what happens in a meeting, or using augmentative and alternative communication techniques and aids where students present with speech and/or language impairments.
  • giving the student options for their contribution to the meeting. This could include:
    • partial or full attendance
    • communicating with a trusted adult (such as a parent or teacher) who will speak for them in the meeting
    • drawing pictures or taking photos about their strengths and learning aspirations and the support that helps meet their learning goals
    • writing about themselves
    • completing a student voice tool (DOCX)External Link template
    • engaging with the inclusive student voice toolkit (DOCX)External Link for guidance on a variety of multi-modal approaches to capture student voice
  • ensuring the student’s contribution is ready for the meeting.

Students may contribute prior to the profile meeting through communication with their teacher, family or another trusted adult, who then presents this information at the profile meeting. This should be done in a way that is most appropriate to the student.

In some rare cases student voice may not be able to be captured in the process. If this is the case, then the parent/carer(s) or teacher can provide the student’s perspective in the process.

Resources to support student voice:

Facilitators

Prior to the meeting, the facilitator will familiarise themselves with the core pieces of supporting information they have about the student and the school, to build a preliminary understanding of the student’s needs and adjustments required to enable participation in their education. The facilitator will use their professional judgement to identify any other documents that could be reviewed ahead of the profile meeting.

All participants

Inclusive education means that all members of every school community are valued and supported to fully participate, learn, develop and succeed within an inclusive school culture. Inclusive education acknowledges that some children and young people have intersecting identities or additional needs that schools may need to take into consideration during the profile meeting.

For further information on the Disability Inclusion vision for inclusion, refer to vision for inclusive education (PPTX)External Link .

Cultural safety of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people

The cultural safety of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people and those from culturally and linguistically diverse communities during the profile meeting is essential. Facilitators have been trained to ensure the cultural safety of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people throughout the profile process.

The Koorie Engagement Workforce can be consulted to support schools to build their capability in creating culturally inclusive schools and may be available to attend profile meetings if necessary. Refer to the Koorie Education policy.

LGBTIQA+ student support

Students who are lesbian, gay, bisexual, trans and gender diverse, intersex, queer, questioning and asexual (LGBTIQA+) have a right to feel safe and included at school. Schools are required to take reasonable steps to eliminate discrimination on the basis of sex, gender and sexuality. The department’s LGBTIQA+ Student Support policy outlines strategies that must be embedded to support LGBTIQA+ students. This policy may support your school in preparing for and participating in a profile meeting.

Please contact Safe Schools on (03) 9637 3699 or safe.schools@education.vic.gov.au for more information and advice.

Support for culturally and/or linguistically diverse students and families

All Victorians are entitled to mutual respect and understanding regardless of their cultural, religious, racial and linguistic backgrounds. Education plays a critical role in promoting social cohesion and building resilience in communities. Schools provide an environment where respectful relationships, acceptance of diversity, knowledge of other cultures and an understanding of global issues and events can be developed. Schools should work to ensure that the profile meeting is culturally inclusive and safe.

Schools must offer interpreting and translation services to parents and carers who have limited or no English language skills to communicate key information about their child’s education. Refer to the department's Interpreting and Translation Services policy.

Information about the Disability Inclusion reform and profile are available in 33 community languagesExternal Link .


Participating in the Disability Inclusion Profile meeting – roles and responsibilities

Participating in the Disability Inclusion Profile meeting – roles and responsibilities

Overview of profile process

The Disability Inclusion Profile (profile) will be completed in a specially convened meeting of the student’s student support group (SSG).

In the profile meeting, all participants will be asked to contribute information about the student to understand their strengths, aspirations and functional needs and the adjustments required to enable them to participate in their education on the same basis as a student without disability.

The video below provides an example of how the profile meeting works, and the roles and responsibilities of attendees. A shorter version of this video for parent/carer(s) is available at Disability Inclusion: a new approach for students with disabilityExternal Link .

Facilitator role in the profile meeting

The facilitator will support participants to discuss and agree on the level of adjustment being provided or required for the student to participate in each of 31 education-related activities in the Functional Needs domain section of the profile. This will include:

  • adjustments currently in place to support the student:
    • adjustments that are being provided, as well as the frequency, the intensity, and personalisation of those adjustments to enable the student’s participation and learning
    • the individual education plan (IEP) learning goals that have been identified for the student and the specific adjustments that the school has in place
  • the specific adjustments that may be required to enable the student to reach their individual learning goals.

If the participants are unable to agree on the level of adjustment the student requires, the facilitator will record the different levels of adjustment discussed in the meeting.

The facilitator will determine the final level of adjustment based on the information provided in the profile meeting and the supporting information.

The discussion should not focus on the student’s disability or impairment, or how challenging it is for the school to enable the student’s participation.

The facilitator will assist the SSG to understand each of the profile sections and may ask the meeting participants questions to ensure detail of the student’s strengths, needs, and adjustments are discussed and well understood by all participants.

The Levels of Adjustment resource (PDF)External Link and Functional Needs Domain Table (PDF)External Link is available to support profile meeting participants.

In finalising the profile, facilitators will consider the information discussed in the meeting as well as relevant supporting information provided prior to the meeting. Schools should share all relevant information in the meeting, as only information shared with the full student support group will inform level of adjustments. At times facilitators may request additional supporting information to confirm what was discussed in the meeting. In this case, only the documents requested by the facilitator should be uploaded. Any additional documents that were not discussed in the meeting or requested by the facilitator after the meeting cannot be considered. For example, a facilitator cannot consider the adjustments outlined in a Behaviour Support Plan if this document was not discussed in the meeting and explicitly requested after the meeting. Refer to: Finalising the Disability Inclusion Profile.

The facilitator will also identify a consensus-agreed date for a subsequent profile meeting. Refer to: Finalising the Disability Inclusion Profile.

Facilitators are unable to tour a school, visit classrooms or observe a student.

For more information about student support groups, refer to the Student Support Groups Policy.

Student’s role in the Disability Inclusion Profile meeting

It is important that students play an active and age-appropriate role in the profile process and contribute to the discussion and decision-making process, either in person or via a trusted adult. For more information, refer to: Preparing for the Disability Inclusion Profile meeting – roles and responsibilities.

The Student voice tool (DOCX)External Link and the Inclusive student voice toolkit (DOCX)External Link are available to support student participation in the process. A social script (DOCX)External Link is also available. It explains the Disability Inclusion Profile meeting for primary school students, using easy English and photos. A version for secondary school students will be available shortly.

An easy English guide (PDF)External Link is also available to explain the profile to students.

Parent/carer(s) role in the Disability Inclusion Profile meeting

At the meeting, parent/carer(s) will be responsible for:

  • providing information about the student’s aspirations, learning, participation, social engagement, and experiences at home, that are relevant to the student’s learning
  • providing information on past adjustments and their effectiveness and any experiences from home that are relevant to the student’s learning both at home and at school
  • supporting or providing student voice in the process if the student does not attend the profile meeting.

The Parent voice tool (DOCX)External Link is available to support parent/carer(s). Easy English resources are also available to support parent/carer(s) understand the profile process (PDF)External Link and the profile meeting (PDF)External Link .

Teacher role in the Disability Inclusion Profile meeting

At the meeting, teachers will be responsible for:

  • providing information about the student’s learning, social engagement, and participation
  • discussing current and potential adjustments
  • providing student voice in the process, where appropriate
  • providing information on student’s progress.

It is best practice for the teacher that attends the profile meeting to gather information from the student’s other teachers so that they have a comprehensive understanding of the student’s functional needs. A profile preparation tool (DOCX)External Link is available to support schools in collecting information about the student from multiple teachers and other relevant staff. This tool has been developed specifically for secondary schools but can be used by all schools as needed.

The teacher attending the meeting should be the teacher with the best knowledge of the student and the adjustments in place to support them. For more information, refer to 'Teacher attendance' in Scheduling a Disability Inclusion Profile meeting.

Preschool/kindergarten teacher role in the Disability Inclusion Profile meeting

For incoming prep-students, preschool/kindergarten teachers may be invited to participate in a Disability Inclusion Profile meeting.

At the meeting, preschool/kindergarten teachers will be responsible for:

  • providing information about the student’s learning, social engagement, and participation
  • discussing adjustments in place at the kindergarten
  • providing student voice in the process, where appropriate
  • providing information on the student’s progress.

In addition, early childhood settings can support the profile process by providing high quality, strengths-based transition learning and development statements, including Section 1.2, which supports enhanced transitions for children with disability or developmental delay, and by completing other assessments such as early ABLES. As per current practice, schools may also ask kindergarten teachers to complete a Vineland assessment.

Principal (or nominee) role in the Disability Inclusion Profile meeting

The principal or principal’s nominee is required to ensure that the profile meeting is coordinated, and all attendees can attend.

In the meeting, the principal or principal’s nominee is responsible for:

  • providing information about the school environment and school wide adjustments (refer to School-wide adjustments – optional form – guidance and examplesExternal Link )
  • providing information about the student’s learning and social engagement
  • helping make sure the voice of all the student’s teachers is provided, where required, such as in secondary schools
  • helping ensure the profile meeting is collaborative and constructive.

Principals or principal’s nominee, while typically responsible for running SSG meetings, are not required to lead the discussion or set the profile meeting’s agenda. The principal or principal’s nominee may wish to record key information or actions from the meeting. Schools can use the profile notes tool for this purpose.

Principal or principal’s nominee role when a student attends 2 schools (dual enrolments)

For students who are enrolled at both a mainstream and specialist school and split their school week between the 2 locations, a principal or principal’s nominee from both settings should attend the profile meeting.

The principal or principal’s nominee of the school the student attends the most is responsible for ensuring that the profile meeting is organised. Where there is a 50/50 split, school leaders can decide which school organises the profile meeting.

Principal or principal’s nominee role when a student attends a re-engagement program

If a student is attending a re-engagement program, these settings may not be sufficiently familiar with the profile or surrounding process to take responsibility for organising the profile meeting. The principal or principal’s nominee of the school in which the student is enrolled should consult the leaders of the re-engagement program and decide who will organise the profile meeting.

If the school in which the student is enrolled takes responsibility for organising the meeting, they should work closely throughout the process with the re-engagement program as they may be best placed to contribute to supporting information, support the student’s voice to be represented, support parent/carer(s) attendance, and contribute to the meeting itself.

Advocate’s role in the Disability Inclusion Profile meeting

It is the right of parent/carer(s) to have an advocate. This can help with:

  • sharing the parent/carer(s)’ knowledge about the student
  • discussing any difficulties the parent/carer(s) may have in the profile meeting
  • developing a cooperative relationship between the parent/carer(s) and the school
  • assisting parent/carer(s) to understand the department’s procedures
  • linking parent/carer(s) with relevant services
  • debriefing with parent/carer(s) after the meeting and filling in gaps in their understanding of the outcomes of the meeting.

Advocates must not be paid for their help. As per the SSG guidance, the role of the parent/carer(s)’ advocate in the meeting is a constructive, supportive and enabling one. Refer to: Student Support Groups.

If required, parent/carer(s) should work with the school to support the advocate to attend.

Interpreter’s role in the Disability Inclusion Profile meeting

Where required, an interpreter (or interpreters), including AUSLAN and deaf interpreters, should be present at the meeting to help with communication in line with the department’s Interpreting and Translation Services policy.

For more information about accessing interpreting and translation services, refer to: Interpreting and Translation Services.

Other attendees’ role in the Disability Inclusion Profile meeting

Other people who work with the student, such as an allied health/social worker, medical professional, education support staff, or person who is involved with the student through the NDIS, can also attend and support the discussion of adjustments by providing information about the student related to their specific expertise and their work with the student.

The role of other attendees is to provide additional information to support the school and parent/carer(s) to discuss and complete the sections of the profile.

All additional attendees must be agreed upon by the school and the parent/carer(s).


Finalising the Disability Inclusion Profile

Finalising the Disability Inclusion Profile

Facilitator finalises Disability Inclusion Profile

Once the profile meeting has concluded, the facilitator will use the information provided by the participants at the meeting, and any supporting information to finalise the profile and complete the profile report. This includes:

  • re-checking the details about the student that were submitted at the profile request stage
  • finalising how the discussion of the student’s strengths and aspirations is recorded
  • confirming the level of adjustment required to enable the student to participate in their education on the same basis as their peers. The facilitator will refer to the information provided in the meeting and supporting information to confirm the level of adjustment
  • finalising how the discussion of the current and potential adjustments to the student’s learning environment is recorded
  • finalising the student support group agreed date for the subsequent profile meeting, where applicable.

If the facilitator requests additional supporting information

Schools are required to provide supporting information prior to the profile meeting. Schools can also bring other supporting information to the meeting – this will not be collected by the facilitator at the meeting and must be provided electronically to the facilitator service. Refer to: Supporting information guidance for schools (DOCX)External Link .

Where there is insufficient supporting information, facilitators may request further supporting information. These requests will be made through the school contact point via email generally within a week of the profile meeting. Schools should work closely with families to collate further supporting information in response to these requests.

Schools have 21 days to provide the requested information to the Disability Inclusion Facilitator Service (facilitator service). Schools should contact the facilitator service to notify them if an extension is required. The 21-day timeframe excludes school holidays.

Facilitators can only consider additional supporting information that has been requested. Other documentation that may be provided cannot be considered. As such, schools should provide all relevant supporting information before the meeting and be able to talk to this at the meeting.

If the additional supporting information is not provided and an extension has not been provided, the facilitator service will finalise the profile based on the supporting information available.

Requests for further supporting information could occur where the:

  • school did not upload all supporting information prior to the meeting
  • relevant supporting information was tabled at the meeting
  • supporting information is incomplete (for example, not all pages have been scanned and uploaded)
  • supporting information that already exists was discussed in the meeting, and the facilitator felt that it would be useful to see this information to help them finalise the profile
  • supporting information provided before the meeting indicates to the facilitator that a different level of adjustment is required, and the facilitator wants to ensure they accurately represent the student’s functional needs
  • additional information on the student’s functional need is required, for example, input from an allied health practitioner or any other assessment as deemed appropriate.

The facilitator service will confirm receipt of additional information.

Schools are not required to provide supporting information after the meeting unless it was discussed at the profile meeting and the facilitator requests this information.

Facilitators will finalise the profile once the requested information has been provided.

Once the profile has been finalised it cannot be reopened again to consider additional supporting information.

For more information, refer to: Supporting information guidance for schools (DOCX)External Link .

Moderation and quality assurance of the Disability Inclusion Profile

Every profile report is subject to quality assurance and may also be subject to moderation processes. These processes are in place to ensure that facilitators are consistently and accurately capturing student need across the state. This process occurs automatically as part of the profile process and is based upon the supporting information provided.

This process is led by facilitator team leaders employed by the facilitator service.

In some cases this moderation process may lead to changes to the levels of adjustment that were discussed in the profile meeting.

The moderation process will also confirm the agreed date (as a minimum the month and year) for the subsequent profile meeting, where applicable. This will align with the general rule that profiles should be reviewed no less than every 2 years (24 months).

Tier 3 validation review

For cases where the student meets the threshold through the profile process, but does not meet the validation criteria, there is a department-led process to consider the student’s individual adjustments and whether tier 3 funding allocation is required, by exemption, to support the student’s functional needs. For more information, refer to: Tier 3 student-level funding.

A panel of central, regional and area staff has been established to review these individual cases. There may be a delay in receiving a profile outcome for profiles subject to this process.

Tier 3 student-level funding

The profile informs eligibility for tier 3 student-level funding and the amount of tier 3 funding allocated to schools. Refer to: Tier 3 student-level funding.

The facilitator service will provide all relevant profile documentation to the department for assessment and decision in relation to tier 3 student-level funding.


Notification of Disability Inclusion Profile outcome

Notification of Disability Inclusion Profile outcome

School and parent/carer(s) receive a Disability Inclusion Profile report

The profile report will be available on the DIFS Portal within 4 school weeks after providing any further supporting information, or 4 school weeks after the profile meeting, where no further information is requested. For clarity, school weeks exclude school holidays. In rare cases, there may be a slight delay in receiving a profile outcome, as the facilitator service and the department may need to undertake quality assurance and moderation activities for specific profiles. Refer to: the DIFS Portal User Guide (PDF)External Link .

The associated School Resource Notification will also be uploaded onto the DIFS Portal with the profile report.

Schools should provide a copy of the profile report to the parent/carer(s) as soon as practically possible. If required, schools should support them in understanding the report. Guidance will be provided to school leadership when the profile report and School Resource Notification is sent to the school.

For families where an interpreter has been involved in the profile meeting, schools must ask the parent/carer(s) whether they want the profile report translated, if they prefer verbal feedback through an interpreter or both. Where a request is made for the report to be translated, this is funded by the school, as per existing processes.

Where appropriate, particularly where a student attends the profile meeting, the school and the SSG should provide feedback to the student about the outcomes of the profile meeting. This might include discussing the implementation of supports and adjustments.

This report includes information about the student’s:

  • current strengths
  • aspirations
  • functional needs
  • adjustments to the learning environment.

The profile report will also outline when the subsequent profile for the student should be completed by.

The parent/carer(s) should be assured the adjustments being implemented for students are detailed in their individual education plan, and that the student support group regularly monitors both the student’s responsiveness to these adjustments and whether these adjustments are being implemented as intended.

Schools should contact disability.inclusion.outcomes@education.vic.gov.au if they have any queries or if there are any inaccuracies in the profile report or School Resource Notification.

The profile report and School Resource Notification should be discussed at the student’s next SSG and the findings and outcomes from the profile should be incorporated into the planning and implementing of adjustments for the student, including incorporating into the student’s IEP, where appropriate. Efforts should be made to hold the meetings as soon as possible after the profile report is provided to the parent. Refer to: Steps following notification of Disability Inclusion Profile outcome.

A copy of the Disability Inclusion Profile report and School Resource Notification must be provided to any future school the student attends.

Schools should consider any opportunities for the profile report to be used to inform other planning and monitoring processes for the student. This could, if appropriate, input into the student’s Educational Needs Analysis.

The profile report and the Nationally Consistent Collection of Data on School Students with Disability

The Disability Inclusion Profile does not determine a level of adjustment for the purpose of the Nationally Consistent Collection of Data on School Students with Disability (NCCD). However, it will provide further information and evidence to support the school team's professional judgement in determining the level of adjustment recorded for the student.

It is important that all students who have undertaken a profile be included in the NCCD.

Refer to: NCCD and Disability Inclusion.

Schools receive a school resource notification

The school resource notification includes, for students eligible for tier 3, an indicative tier 3 funding allocation.

This is an indicative funding allocation only. The exact funding amount will be reflected in end of term Student Resource Package (SRP) updates. The school will be provided an end of term tier 3 funding summary via email shortly after the SRP update detailing confirmed funding amounts. Should the student have alternative enrolment arrangements (attends 2 schools), the final allocation will reflect this. Refer to: Tier 3 student-level funding.

It is highly recommended that the school resource notification is communicated to the parent/carer(s). The school resource notification should be tabled at the student’s next SSG meeting. Guidance will be provided to school leadership on communications to parent/carers when the profile report and school resource notification is sent to the school. Refer to: Steps following notification of Disability Inclusion Profile outcome.

For questions about the funding allocation, timelines, or process, please contact disability.inclusion.outcomes@education.vic.gov.au

Disability coordinator is notified of the outcome of the Disability Inclusion Profile

The regional disability coordinator receives the profile report and School Resource Notification, advising them of any tier 3 student-level funding outcome resulting from the profile meeting, so they can support schools with any queries.

Timetable for funding allocations

Disability Inclusion funding support does not have deadlines, annual rounds, or submission dates. Funding for students supported by the Program for Students with Disabilities (PSD) will continue for individual students until a profile is completed. Schools can request a profile for students at any time if the student meets the request requirements. The facilitator service will prioritise students with the highest functional needs for profile meetings.

Generally, any Disability Inclusion tier 3 funding that results from a profile will apply from the term following the receipt of a complete profile meeting request. Funding may commence at a later date if the profile request process is postponed by the school.

For students who have enrolled at a new school, tier 3 funding will be backdated for eligible students if a complete profile request is received within 2 terms of student enrolment. (Note: The profile meeting itself does not have to be held within 2 terms).

For the definition of a ‘complete profile request’ refer to Requirements to submit a ‘complete profile request’External Link .

Important: Submitting the screening questions alone will not meet the eligibility requirements to access backdated funding.

Schools will receive confirmation of funding allocations in the school’s termly budget update.

For existing students supported through the PSD who are yet to undertake a profile, their PSD funding allocation will continue to appear in schools’ budget reports as they do currently.


Steps following notification of Disability Inclusion Profile outcome

Steps following notification of Disability Inclusion Profile outcome

Discuss the profile report and School Resource Notification

It is the responsibility of the principal (or nominee) to reconvene the Student Support Group (SSG) to discuss the profile report and School Resource Notification and incorporate any learnings into the student’s Individual Education Plan (IEP). This may be done at the next regularly scheduled SSG meeting, or before. Efforts should be made to hold the meetings as soon as possible after the profile report is provided to the parent. The revised IEP should be discussed with the student’s teacher(s) to ensure that they are aware of any changes and the support needs required to enable the student to meet their learning goal(s).

Schools can decide with parent/carer(s) if the profile report will be provided to other people, for example, allied health professionals or education support staff.

Once the profile has been finalised, the SSG will have a key role in working with the principal or principal’s nominee on the educational program for the student and the nature of the additional resources required to support the program, including those identified through the profile. The SSG may consider how the resources could best be used, however, it is the principal’s role to make decisions about resource allocation.

It is important that the SSG consider specific, targeted evidence-based strategies that will have lasting and long-term benefits for the student, as well as building the capacity of the school to provide an effective, inclusive curriculum for students with additional learning needs.

For example, where an individual student presents with challenging behaviour, implementing evidence-based strategies included in a behaviour support plan informed by a functional behaviour analysis will also build staff capacity to address behaviours of concern in other students.

Communicate the School Resource Notification

It is highly recommended that the School Resource Notification is communicated to the parent/carer(s). The School Resource Notification should be tabled at the student’s next SSG meeting. The school should advise the student’s parent/carer(s) of the funding outcome at this meeting. While the focus of the meeting should be on the profile report and planning and implementing adjustments to meet the student’s needs, the tabling of the School Resource Notification is important to provide parents with transparency and ensure the SSG has a clear picture of the resources in place to support the student.

Schools must make reasonable adjustments to ensure that students with disability can access and participate in education on the same basis as students without disability, regardless of the availability of additional funding. Additional resources provided to schools do not define or limit the support provided for students with disability. Refer to: Students with Disability.


Requesting a subsequent Disability Inclusion Profile

Requesting a subsequent Disability Inclusion Profile

Overview of subsequent profile processes

Disability Inclusion does not set specific timeframes for the frequency of profile meetings for students.

The period between profile meetings will be based on each student’s circumstances and their school environment.

Profile meetings should generally be scheduled at intervals of no less than 2 years (24 months) and no more than 7 years, depending on the student’s age and individual circumstances, except in exceptional circumstances. This timing applies to all completed profiles, including for those students that are ineligible for tier 3 – student-level funding, as a result of their last profile.

During a profile meeting, the facilitator will seek to reach a consensus with the student support group (SSG) about when best to have the subsequent meeting. The frequency of profiles for a student will reflect their age, their needs and the setting or settings they are attending. The SSG should also consider key transition points or any expected change in school setting, as the adjustments recorded in the profile are context-based.

Generally, many students may have a profile completed upon commencing school, in Years 3 or 4 and a final profile at the commencement of secondary school. As examples, the following exceptions may apply:

  • profile meetings may be scheduled more frequently for younger children in expectation of early developmental gains, but less frequently for an older student, such as those in secondary school.
  • a longer period before the subsequent profile may be advisable for students with stable functional needs that are unlikely to change
  • more regular profile meetings are recommended for students who have fluctuating needs, as their developmental trajectory may be less predictable, and their functional needs may vary
  • the student’s SSG should use their judgement to determine when the subsequent profile should occur for students that have undertaken a profile towards the end of their time in one school setting and will be moving to a new school setting. As a general rule, a subsequent profile should only occur if there are significant new adjustments required or are in place to enable the student’s learning and participation at the new setting.

A recommendation for the subsequent meeting date will be outlined in the profile report. For students eligible for tier 3 funding, the subsequent profile period outlined in the profile report will align to the funding period. The SSG may wish to undertake a profile before this date if the needs of the students change or the student changes settings.

Requesting the subsequent profile

Schools can submit a subsequent profile request at: Disability Inclusion Facilitator ServiceExternal Link .

Schools should submit the complete profile meeting request before the end of the suggested year in the 'Suggested Subsequent Disability Inclusion Profile' section of the existing Profile.

For more information, refer to: School and parent/carer(s) receive a Disability Inclusion Profile report.

Requesting a profile for a student that moves schools

If a student moves schools, the SSG at the new school may consider requesting the subsequent profile after the student commences at the new school. Alternatively, the SSG may wait until the timing agreed in the student’s previous profile to hold the subsequent profile meeting. When making this decision, the SSG should consider whether there are significant new adjustments required in the new setting that would make the profile a valuable exercise. Should the adjustments remain largely the same, an earlier profile may be less useful.

Requesting a subsequent profile within 24 months

Profile meetings should generally be scheduled at intervals of no less than 2 years (24 months) and no more than 7 years, depending on the student’s age and individual circumstances, except in exceptional circumstances.

Schools may wish to undertake a profile for the same student within 24 months of the last profile meeting, where a student’s needs and presentation have meaningfully changed, there is a deteriorating medical condition, or significant new adjustments are required to support the student.

In these cases, schools must contact their regional disability coordinator prior to requesting a profile within 24 months and seek their advice and support. The regional disability coordinator will advise if an early profile is appropriate. The facilitator service will confirm that the regional disability coordinator has been consulted before progressing the subsequent profile request. The school should keep a record of the regional disability coordinator advice.

Schools can submit a subsequent profile request within 24 months request at: Disability Inclusion Facilitator ServiceExternal Link .


Appealing a Disability Inclusion Profile outcome

Appealing a Disability Inclusion Profile outcome

School principals can appeal the outcome of a profile, if it was determined ineligible for tier 3 funding, on the following grounds:

  • there were procedural deficiencies in the profile and tier 3 funding process
  • there is new and substantial information that was not considered in the profile process.

Note: ‘New and substantial information’ must relate only to matters or topics discussed at the profile meeting, or to additional supporting information that was specifically requested after the profile meeting. Information about supports and/or adjustments put in place after the profile meeting will not constitute grounds for an appeal.

The facilitation style of individual facilitators does not constitute grounds for an appeal. Feedback on a specific facilitator or profile meeting may be provided directly to the facilitator service via email at contact@difs.com.au

Requesting an appeal

To seek an appeal, the principal must be able to substantiate that there was a procedural deficiency or demonstrate that there is new and substantial information that was not considered in finalising the original profile (note the definition of ‘new and substantial information’ above). Schools must contact their regional disability coordinator prior to making an appeal and seek their advice and support. The panel will consider the advice provided by the regional disability coordinator to the school in considering the broader grounds for appeal.

Only one appeal can be submitted per profile outcome.

An appeal must be lodged within 15 school days of receipt of the profile report and school resource notification. Appeals must be submitted to contact@difs.com.au.

Schools are required to discuss their concerns about the profile outcome and/or process with their regional disability coordinator prior to placing an appeal.

If, following the discussion with the regional disability coordinator, the school still wishes to lodge an appeal, they must first discuss the matter with the student’s student support group (SSG). Documentation of the SSG’s consensus to appeal the profile outcome must accompany the appeal.

Schools must copy (cc) the regional disability coordinator when the appeal is submitted.

The appeal must contain a cover letter from the school principal clearly stating that it is an appeal and the grounds for appeal. This must include:

  • the nature of the procedural deficiency that has been identified and a clear statement of any alleged procedural deficiencies or
  • the new and substantial information available, what activity/s of the profile this relates to, and why this supports a different level(s) of adjustment in the profile. The letter should also indicate why this information was not available either at the time of the profile meeting or before the profile was finalised. The new information should be attached to the appeal.

The Director, Disability Inclusion Delivery, or delegate will review all information provided in considering an appeal.

Note: An appeal on the grounds of new and substantial information can only occur after the initial profile outcome and if the new information is related to the supports and adjustments discussed within the profile meeting, or was specifically requested after the profile meeting. Appeals are not the same as a request for a subsequent profile or a subsequent profile within 24 months, which can be made at any stage if the there is a significant change in the student’s functional needs in a short period of time (for example, a deteriorating medical condition). Refer to: Requesting a subsequent Disability Inclusion Profile.

Within 2 school weeks of the appeal being submitted, schools will receive an email confirming receipt of the appeal and an estimated time for when the appeal will be finalised.

Receiving the outcome of an appeal

The school principal and/or the school key contact will receive the outcome of the appeal as soon as possible after it has been determined. The regional disability coordinator will be included in any appeal correspondence.

The appeal process could take up to one term to finalise.

An appeal on the ground of procedural deficiency

In almost all instances where procedural deficiencies have been identified and confirmed by the Director, Disability Inclusion Delivery, or delegate, the outcome of an appeal will trigger a new profile meeting for the student.

In the case of a profile meeting convened following an appeal, a different facilitator will conduct and facilitate this meeting.

An appeal on the grounds of new and substantial supporting information

Based on an assessment of the appeal on the grounds of new and substantial information, there may be:

  • No change – the supporting information submitted has not changed the level of adjustments within the profile. The school should continue to provide reasonable adjustments to the student to enable their participation at school.
  • Change to level of adjustment – the profile is updated based on new supporting evidence and changes are made to the level (or levels) of adjustment. A new profile report and school resource notification is completed, and the principal is notified as soon as possible of the new funding amount and funding start date.
  • New profile meeting – the supporting information provided demonstrates that it could be helpful to reconvene the profile meeting. The principal will be notified of next steps, and facilitator service will be contacted to arrange a new meeting.

The relevant regional disability coordinator will be notified of the outcome of all appeals.


Enrolment in specialist schools

Enrolment in specialist schools

Schools can refer to the department’s Enrolment policy: Enrolment in specialist schools for information on the specific requirements for enrolment in specialist schools, including for those schools who have transitioned to Disability Inclusion.


Resources

Resources

Please refer to the department’s collated list of links and resources to support disability inclusion (DOCX)External Link . Schools can also access professional learning on Disability Inclusion through ARC, Refer to: ArcExternal Link and ARC regional pages.

Disability Inclusion Profile and Process

Preparing for and participating in a profile meeting

Communication and engagement tools

Inclusive Education professional learning offerings

Abilities Based Learning and Education Support

Abilities Based Learning and Education Support (ABLES)External Link is an assessment and reporting suite for identifying and monitoring the learning readiness and progress of students with disability and diverse learners. The ABLES professional learning modulesExternal Link build the knowledge and skills of teachers and other school professionals by supporting them to understand, implement and use ABLES.

Disability Inclusion 101 professional learning series

The Disability Inclusion 101 professional learning seriesExternal Link consists of live webinars designed to support school staff to learn the basics or refresh knowledge about Disability Inclusion (including the Disability Inclusion Profile).

Disability Inclusion eLearning modules

Disability Inclusion eLearning modules are available for school staff to access at any time. There are 7 modules across a range of topics to support schools to implement Disability Inclusion. To access the modules, go to LearnED in eduPayExternal Link (staff login required) and search for ‘Disability Inclusion’.

Diverse Learners Hub

The Diverse Learners HubExternal Link provides evidence-based advice, information, resources and professional learning opportunities for school staff on how to identify and support ‘diverse learners’, including students with autism, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and learning difficulties such as dyslexia and dyscalculia.

Inclusion Outreach Coaching

Inclusion Outreach CoachesExternal Link assist schools to set up Tier 1 preventative schoolwide systems, practices, and data so they can sustain and strengthen their evidence-based inclusive practices over time.

Inclusive Classrooms professional learning program

The Inclusive Classrooms professional learning programExternal Link offers a suite of blended learning courses for school staff focused on practical teaching strategies, adjustments and supports at the school, classroom and individual levels. Courses include supporting students with autism, behaviour, hearing loss, learning difficulties, oral language needs and vision impairment.

Master of Inclusive Education and Graduate Certificate Initiative

The Masters of Inclusive EducationExternal Link and Graduate Certificate in Education (Learning Difficulties)External Link programs offer funded postgraduate study opportunities in inclusive and specialist education or learning difficulties for teachers in Victorian government schools and regional employees who are keen to strengthen their inclusive education teaching practices and better support students with diverse learning needs.

Statewide Vision Resource Centre

The Statewide Vision Resource CentreExternal Link provides professional learning opportunities for school staff and allied health professionals in addition to specialised and professional assistance and resources, including the provision of learning materials in alternative formats to support students who are blind or have low vision.

Victorian Deaf Education Institute

The Victorian Deaf Education InstituteExternal Link provides professional learning opportunities for school staff to improve learning and wellbeing outcomes for deaf or hard of hearing students.


Reviewed 14 September 2021