vic_logo
education.vic.gov.au

Student Resource Package — Equity Funding (Student Based Funding)

Policy last updated

5 August 2021

Scope

  • Schools
  • School councils

Contact

There are multiple contacts for this topic. Refer also to the contacts heading at the bottom of the page


Date:
February 2020

Policy

Refer to the Resources tab for Word and PDF versions of the 2021 Confirmed Guide and other SRP resources

Policy

This policy provides information about how funding is allocated to schools through the Student Resource Package (SRP) for additional learning needs.

Details

Equity funding is one of two types of student based funding. The other type of student based funding is Core Student Learning Allocation Funding.

Student based funding represents the main funding source for all schools and comprises approximately 90% of the total SRP provided to schools.  This funding is designed to cover core teaching and learning, leadership, teaching support, professional development, relief teaching, payroll tax and superannuation costs for the school. 

The SRP provides equity funding where additional funding is required to compensate for additional learning needs. The specific types of Equity funding are listed below.

The Guidance tab provides information about each of the specific types of equity funding:

Education State (Including additional Gonski) 

  • Equity (Social Disadvantage)
  • Equity (Catch Up)

Other Equity

  • Mobility

Programs for Students with Disabilities

  • Program for Students with Disabilities Levels 1-6
  • Program for Students with Disabilities — Transition Support Funding
  • Special School Complexity
  • Interpreter Staff Salaries
  • Medical Intervention Support
  • Special School Transport Administrative Cost

English as an Additional Language

  • EAL Program Funding
  • EAL Contingency Funding

Disability Inclusion

Applicable to schools in Bayside Peninsula, Barwon and Loddon Campaspe areas, and 5 supported inclusion schools in 2021.

  • Tier 2 school-level funding
  • Tier 3 student-level funding – information will be provided later in 2021

Not all types of funding are available to all schools. Funding is assessed according to school and student need.

Schools are expected to use SRP funds for the purpose for which it was allocated.

For more general information on the SRP, please refer to the Student Resource Package — Overview page.

Contacts

SRP Support
Phone: 1800 641 943
Email: studentresourcepackage@education.vic.gov.au

Contact details: Services Portal (Service Request SRP Option) 1800 641 943

For queries regarding the PSD: Services Portal (‘log a request’ and select ‘PSDMS’)

For queries regarding EAL:
Phone: 03 7022 1111
Email: eal@education.vic.gov.au

Contact

There are multiple contacts for this topic. Refer also to the contacts heading at the bottom of the page


Guidance

Guidance

The SRP provides Equity Funding where additional funding is required to compensate for additional learning needs. These needs are categorised as:

Education State (including additional Gonski) 

  • Equity (Social Disadvantage)
  • Equity (Catch Up)

Other Equity

  • Mobility

Programs for Students with Disabilities

  • Program for Students with Disabilities Levels 1-6
  • Program for Students with Disabilities — Transition Support Funding
  • Special School Complexity
  • Interpreter Staff Salaries
  • Medical Intervention Support
  • Special School Transport Administrative Cost

English as an Additional Language

  • EAL Program Funding
  • EAL Contingency Funding

Disability Inclusion

  • Tier 2 school-level funding

Equity (Social Disadvantage) (Reference 11)

Equity (Social Disadvantage) (Reference 11)

Funding for Equity (Social Disadvantage) provides an individual loading for students from disadvantaged backgrounds that will increase with the density of disadvantage at the school. Social disadvantage can often place students well behind their peers when entering the education system. Increased funding for schools has proven to raise educational outcomes, particularly for these students. Schools will use Social Disadvantage funding to deliver tailored educational programs that meet the needs of this cohort of students.

The Equity (Social Disadvantage) loading allocates funding based on parental occupation, parental education and the level of concentration of disadvantage in a school. Students with the highest level of need will be targeted with the most funding to ensure schools have the resources to support them. The loading is need based, however to increase year on year stability for schools, a floor on negative funding changes and a weighted rolling average is applied to this loading.

While having similarities to the former Student Family Occupation (SFO) index, the Equity (Social Disadvantage) funding contains some important differences:

  • Social Disadvantage utilises both the Student Family Education (SFE) and SFO index, further strengthening the targeting of existing and new equity funding.
  • The median threshold previously used under the SFO for equity no longer exists.
  • All students identified with high needs will be provided with funding.

Eligibility

  • All School types are eligible, students identified with high needs will be provided with funding at school level.*

Funding will be calculated at the Indicative budget cycle only, schools are provided with cash and credit funding.

How social disadvantage is identified

The level of Social Disadvantage is measured through the student’s Student Family Occupation and Education (SFOE), which is a combination of their SFO and SFE categories. The matrix below in Table 1 depicts the possible SFOE categories a student may have. These categories are used to determine which students come from disadvantaged backgrounds and the Social Disadvantage loading they would attract. There are two levels of Social Disadvantage loadings available, depending on the student’s level of need: 

Level 1: For students with parents who are unemployed with below diploma level education or have lower skilled jobs with very low or low education

Level 2: For students with parents who have various combinations of medium and low skilled jobs and education levels, or are unemployed with a diploma level education

Table 1

The letters (A to U) in the far right columns reference SFO categories

CASES21 Code Education Category
A B C D N U
0 SFE Not Stated/Unknown 0 0 0 0 0 0
1 SFE Yr 9 or below 0 0 2 1 1 0
2 SFE Yr 10 or equivalent 0 0 2 1 1 0
3 SFE Yr 11 or equivalent 0 0 2 2 1 0
4 SFE Yr 12 or equivalent 0 0 0 2 1 0
5 SFE Certificate I to IV 0 0 0 2 1 0
6 SFE Advanced Dip/Diploma 0 0 0 0 2 0
7 SFE Bachelor degree or above 0 0 0 0 0 0

The density of need according to each school’s new SFOE index will further weight the Social Disadvantage loadings.

To calculate the SFO index, the parent’s occupation is categorised and weighted according to the categories found in Table 2 below. Data regarding occupational categories is collected each year as part of the August census

Table 2

Category Occupation Grouping Weighting
A Senior management in large business organisation, government administration and defence, and qualified professionals 0.00
B Other business managers, arts/media/sports persons and associate professionals 0.25
C Tradesmen/women, skilled office, sales and service staff 0.50
D Machine operators, hospitality staff, assistants, labourers and related workers 0.75
N Unemployed & pensioners (for 12 months or longer) 1.00

Data recorded in the August census as 'unknown' is allocated to the SFO density category as ‘Occupation Group A’ and attracts a zero weighting.

For detailed categorisation of SFO occupational categories please refer to the link below:

SFO.aspx

SFO, SFO and SFOE index calculation

The SFO index is then calculated using the method below: 

SFO calculation = (number of students x weighting for each occupational category) / total number of students based on the occupational groupings and weightings in Table 2

To calculate the SFE index, the parent’s educational qualification is categorised and weighted according to the categories found in Table 3 below. Data regarding educational qualification is collected annually as part of the August census.

Table 3

CASES21 Code Qualification Grouping Weighting
0 Not stated/Unknown 0.00
7 Bachelor degree or above 0.00
6 Advanced diploma/Diploma 0.40
5 Certificate I to IV (inc. trade certificate) 0.50
4 Year 12 or equivalent 0.40
3 Year 11 or equivalent 0.70
2 Year 10 or equivalent 0.90
1 Year 9 or equivalent or below 1.00

NOTE: CASES21 Code 8 is No non-school qualification and defaults to the highest year of school completion.

The SFE index is then calculated using the method below: 

SFE calculation = (number of students x weighting for each educational category) / total number of students

To determine the SFOE index with the SFO and SFE indices, the following calculation is used:

SFOE calculation = (SFO index + SFE index) / 2

Example: If a school has an SFO of 0.6342 and an SFE of 0.6156, the SFOE index would be 0.6249.

How social disadvantage funding is calculated

Social Disadvantage funding is allocated to schools based on the number of eligible students. Measures are applied to provide more stability in funding while reflecting the need profile of current and more recent student cohorts. A weighted rolling average based on the current year and two years preceding will be used to determine the inputs that Social Disadvantage funding allocations are based on. The weightings are 70 per cent of the current year, 20 per cent of the prior year, and 10 per cent of the year before that will be applied to the campus SFOE index and the number of eligible Level 1 and 2 students.

To determine how much Social Disadvantage funding a school will receive, the following method is used (weighted accordingly for the current year and the two previous years): 

  • The school’s SFOE will be used to calculate the rate of Social Disadvantage loading each student will attract. Where a school’s SFOE is at or below the Minimum SFOE Threshold, the minimum rate of each loading will be applied and, where it is at or above the Maximum SFOE Threshold, each student attracts the Maximum Rate for their loading. (Thresholds and rates can be found in Table 4). 
  • For schools with an SFOE between the Minimum SFOE threshold and the Maximum SFOE threshold, the rate will be tapered based on their SFOE index. To determine the taper, the following calculation is used:

((Campus' SFOE – Minimum SFOE Threshold) / (Maximum SFOE Threshold-Minimum SFOE Threshold))

This is then applied to each loading rate by:

Min Funding Rate + (Taper x (Max Funding Rate – Min Funding Rate))

  • Once the Social Disadvantage loading rates are determined for the school, it is multiplied by the number of enrolled students eligible for either the level 1 loading or level 2 loading, respectively. The enrolment is based on the students recorded in the August census of the preceding year.
  • The school’s overall Social Disadvantage funding is calculated by combining both the total level 1 and level 2 loadings their students are eligible for. 
  • To further reduce negative funding variability, a $90,000 floor on negative funding changes is applied to a school’s Social Disadvantage funding allocation from one year to the next. This means that a school’s Social Disadvantage funding allocation will not reduce by more than $90,000 year on year.

Example - Social Disadvantage funding for a primary school with the following SFOE and enrolment numbers over three years:

2020 Actual 2019 Actual 2018 Actual 2020 Weighted (70%) 2019 Weighted (20%) 2018 Weighted (10%) Weighted Average
SFOE 0.6021 0.5313 0.5189 0.4215 0.1063 0.0519 0.5797
Level 1 166 174 160 116.2 34.8 16 167
Level 2 118 140 144 82.6 28 14.4 125

Example of Loading calculations for a primary school (excluding the floor):

  • Level 1 student: ($968 + ((0.5797 – 0.3612) / (0.6192 – 0.3612)) × ($5241 – $968)) × 167 enrolment = $765,996
  • Level 2 student: ($484 + ((0.5797 – 0.3612) / (0.6192 – 0.3612)) × ($2622 – $484)) × 125 enrolment = $286,834
  • Total Social Disadvantage funding: $765,996 + $286,834 = $1,052,830

Table 4

Minimum SFOE Threshold Maximum SFOE Threshold Level 1 Student Minimum Rate Level 1 Student Maximum Rate Level 2 Student Minimum Rate Level 2 Student Maximum Rate
Primary 0.3612 0.6192 $968 $5,241 $484 $2,622
Secondary 0.3612 0.6192 $862 $4,653 $432 $2,326
Special 0.5040 0.7336 $968 $5,241 $484 $2,622
Language 0.3612 0.6192 $968 $5,241 $484 $2,622

*A minimum funding allocation = $5000

The enrolment is based on the numbers of Level 1 and 2 students recorded in annually in the August census of the preceding year. Data for 2021 is calculated using August 2020 census data submitted by schools and is not adjusted for the 2021 calendar year. The rolling weighted average also relies on August census data from the two periods prior (2019 and 2018).

Equity (social disadvantage) funding displayed in the Student Resource Package (SRP) reports

Funding calculated through the Equity (Social Disadvantage) formula is displayed in the SRP reports under the section entitled Education State (Including Additional Gonski).

*The equity calculation for Parkville College is undertaken outside the standard formulation outlined in this section.


Equity (Catch Up) (Reference 12)

Equity (Catch Up) (Reference 12)

Equity (Catch Up) funding will target students who enter secondary schools and are at risk of educational failure. Secondary students who did not meet the national minimum standards in the National Assessment Program — Literacy and Numeracy (NAPLAN) in Year 5 (Reading) will each attract the catch up loading. This catch up loading is not affected by the school’s or student’s level of disadvantage and is based only of the academic achievement of the student. 

This catch up loading will be allocated according to the number of enrolled students who have not met the agreed NAPLAN national minimum standard in Year 5. The annual payment will continue for the student’s entire secondary school education. The funding will allow secondary schools to invest in proven interventions, such as one-on-one numeracy support or targeting teaching coaching to assist students to catch up academically. 

Identifying eligible students

Students enrolled in government secondary schools are identified via their NAPLAN results at Year 5 using their Victorian School Number (VSN). The number of students is aggregated at a school/campus level to provide a total number of students per school/campus.

The 2021 Indicative Student Resource Package (SRP) includes students that were assessed in the 2019 NAPLAN tests. An update of student movements using updated NAPLAN data will be applied to the 2021 Confirmed SRP release.

Year level match to NAPLAN results

In most cases, a student’s Year 5 NAPLAN result will be used to determine their eligibility for the catch up loading. However, there are cases where this is not possible as VSNs were only included in the NAPLAN dataset from 2011 onwards. As a transitional arrangement, students will be matched to their earliest NAPLAN test which could be linked through their VSN.

The following table shows the mapping that will occur in cases where a student’s NAPLAN results are unavailable through their VSN:

Secondary Year Level

2019 NAPLAN Year 7 Year 8 Year 9 Year 10 Year 11 Year 12
First match Year 5 NAPLAN Year 5 NAPLAN Year 5 NAPLAN Year 5 NAPLAN Year 5 NAPLAN Year 5 NAPLAN
Second match (if no first match) N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A

Catch up loading and students funded under the Program for Students with Disability (PSD)

The Program for Students with Disabilities (PSD) is a targeted supplementary funding program for Victorian government schools. It provides resources to schools for a defined population of students with disabilities, with moderate to severe needs. In recognition of the financial support these students receive, eligible PSD funded students attending mainstream schools will be eligible for a reduced catch up loading ($1,144 in 2021). Students from specialist schools will not receive catch up loading.

There is comprehensive review of the PSD underway to investigate how to improve the way the PSD supports students with disabilities. Following the conclusion of the PSD review, the catch up loading approach for PSD students will be reassessed. 

Withdrawn/absent students

Students who were absent from NAPLAN are given a rating on the likelihood they achieved below the national minimum standard in NAPLAN Reading. These values are provided by the Victorian Curriculum Assessment Authority and are based on a methodology used by the Australian Curriculum, Assessment and Reporting Authority to impute NAPLAN values for absent students. This does not include exempt PSD and EAL students. 

Where a student is absent, they will be eligible for a portion of the catch up loading based on the rating they receive in relation to their likelihood of being below the national minimum standard at Year 5. 

Students who are recorded as withdrawn because their parents have made a decision for their child not to sit Year 5 NAPLAN will not be eligible for the catch up loading.

Eligibility

Mainstream schools with the following campus types are eligible for Equity (Catch Up) funding at campus level:

  • Secondary
  • Primary/Secondary Combined
  • Community
  • Spec Dev
  • Language.

Funding is calculated at the Confirmed budget cycle, campuses are provided with cash and credit funding. Allocations provided in the Indicative budget cycle reflect student data as at March 2021.

Calculation

A school’s overall catch up funding allocation is determined by combining the amounts from the following calculations: 

  • Number of secondary graded students below Y5 national minimum standard x Level 1 per capita rate (non-PSD funded)
  • Number of Secondary graded students below Y5 national minimum standard x Level 2 per capita rate (PSD funded).

Rates — 2021

Catch up loading

Catch Up Credit ($) Cash ($) Total Catch Up ($)
Level 1 (non-PSD funded) 1,145 1,142 2,287
Level 2 (PSD funded) 573 571 1,144

Important Items to note:

  • The allocations provided in the 2020 SRP are based on 2018 NAPLAN data from 2011 to 2017.
  • The eligible student names and or VSNs are not available to schools.

Catch Up (Special Circumstances)

Catch Up (Special Circumstances) funding applies to students who are exempt from sitting NAPLAN and students who cannot be matched with their NAPLAN data (e.g. students who sat their test interstate).

A campus will be eligible for Catch Up (Special Circumstances) funding where it has at least 10 Special Circumstances students, and these students make up at least 10% of the secondary cohort.

All exempt students at eligible campuses will receive special circumstance funding.

Students without a NAPLAN score at eligible campuses are funded at a proportional FTE based on the campus they are attending.

The following is an example of the eligibility and calculation:

  • A campus has 100 secondary students, 20 of these students are currently funded for Equity (Catch Up) (= 20%).
  • The campus has 5 exempt students and 5 students who cannot be matched with NAPLAN data. The campus has 10 special circumstances students in total and these students represent 10% of the secondary cohort, meaning the campus satisfies the eligibility criteria.
  • The 5 exempt students will receive Catch Up (Special Circumstances) loading.
  • The campus will also receive Catch Up (Special Circumstances) loading for 1 FTE based on the 5 students who cannot be matched with NAPLAN data (20% x 5 = 1 funded FTE).
  • 6 students will be funded at half the current Catch Up rate as outlined below.

Catch Up (Special Circumstances) Loading

Catch Up (Special Circumstances) Credit ($) Cash ($) Total Catch Up ($)
Level 1 (non-PSD funded) 573 571 1,144
Level 2 (PSD funded) 287 285 572

Mobility (Reference 14)

Mobility (Reference 14)

Schools with high levels of student mobility over a sustained period of time receive mobility funding. This funding should be used by schools to design and provide programs that are specific to the needs of mobile students.

Schools eligible for mobility funding are those with a transient enrolment density equal to or greater than 10% when averaged over 3 years and must have mobility enrolments in all 3 years. The transient enrolment density for each school is a measure of the number of students who enrolled at the school during abnormal times as defined by the following criteria:

  • Students who enrolled at the school in the previous year after the mid-year census and up to 30 November OR who enrolled in the current year between 1 March and the current mid-year census are counted as transient enrolments.

Transient enrolment density is calculated as the school’s transient enrolment divided by the total school enrolments provided in the August census of the previous year.

Eligibility

Schools with the following campus types are eligible for mobility funding at campus level if they meet the transient criteria above:

  • Primary
  • Secondary
  • Primary/Secondary Combined
  • Community.

Funding is calculated at the Indicative budget cycle, campuses are provided with cash and credit funding.

Calculation

Mobility Funding = Base + (Total transient enrolments x Student per capita rate)

Example: a school with 25 transient enrolments would calculate their funding as:

Base + (Total transient enrolments (25) × Student per capita rate)

Rates — 2021

  • Base rate ($) — 2,529
  • Per capita ($) — 350

Program for Students with Disabilities Levels 1-6 (Reference 15)

Program for Students with Disabilities Levels 1-6 (Reference 15)

The Program for Students with Disabilities (PSD) is a targeted supplementary funding program for Victorian government schools. It provides resources to schools for a defined population of students with disabilities, with high needs, to support the provision of school-based educational programs.

Schools receive funding for students with current eligibility at one of six levels, informed by the responses provided to the Educational Needs Questionnaire.

Use of funding

Resources provided to the school can be used in a number of ways to support students, including:

  • teaching staff
  • specialist staff (for example, Special Needs Coordinator, occupational therapist, speech pathologists)
  • consultancy or professional development
  • specialist equipment or materials
  • education support staff
  • associated payroll tax
  • superannuation.

PSD resources assist schools to meet their obligations under the Disability Discrimination Act 1992 (Cth); they do not define or limit the support provided by a school for a student with a disability. 

The Student Support Group is the primary source of advice to the principal on the personalised learning and support required. Schools are required to establish Student Support Groups for all students supported under the PSD, refer to Student Support Groups.

It is the responsibility of the school, in consultation with parents/carers in the Student Support Group, to determine the specific nature of the support required, and schools are required to consider their total budget in supporting a student with a disability.

Eligibility

Schools with the following campus types are eligible for Programs for Students with Disabilities funding at school level.

  • Primary
  • Secondary
  • Primary/Secondary Combined
  • Special

Funding is calculated for each of the four school terms and allocated through credit funding.

Calculation details

PSD resources are allocated according to enrolment information provided by schools via the Program for Students with Disabilities Management System (PSDMS) prior to budget-critical dates early each term.

Where student details are entered incorrectly in CASES21, or enrolments are not registered in PSDMS prior to budget critical dates each term, Program for Students with Disabilities funding cannot be guaranteed.

Principals must ensure all students eligible for the PSD are listed on PSDMS prior to these critical dates. Enrolment details for new students, or current students not listed on PSDMS, must be promptly uploaded from CASES21 and registered in PSDMS, see PSDMS.

Where a student transfers during the school year, resources remaining for the year will be adjusted and made available to the new school from the commencement of the next school term (pending enrolment registration on PSDMS). The Student Resource Package (SRP) is revised at the end of each term (as required) to capture these changes. 

Schools should make local arrangements to transfer resources for enrolment changes occurring during term.

Where agreement has been reached that a student is enrolled and attends two schools, the allocation will be provided on a pro-rata basis consistent with the enrolment details contained in CASES21 and registered on PSDMS.

Rates — 2021

  • Level 1 — Credit ($) 7,773
  • Level 2 — Credit ($) 17,978
  • Level 3 — Credit ($) 28,379
  • Level 4 — Credit ($) 38,732
  • Level 5 — Credit ($) 49,005
  • Level 6 — Credit ($) 59,334

Example: a school with 5 Level 3 enrolments would calculate their funding as:

Level 3 enrolments (5) × Level 3 Rate

This calculation will be repeated for all enrolment levels at the school.

Levels of funding are determined in accordance with PSD eligibility criteria, which are set out in the PSD Guidelines for Schools below.

Important items to note:

  • The Indicative SRP is based on PSD application and enrolment information as at Term 3 the year prior. Allocations are updated in the Confirmed SRP, capturing enrolment and application changes that occur between Term 3 and Term 1.
  • PSD allocations should be reviewed termly in PSDMS (Resource Allocation Listing) and the SRP (Budget Details report), and any questions can be logged via the DET Services Portal. Reconciliation requests can only be considered on a one-term basis. Requests for budget adjustments cannot be considered beyond the previous term.

Further information


Program for Students with Disabilities — Transition Support Funding (Reference 66)

Program for Students with Disabilities — Transition Support Funding (Reference 66)

Transition Support Funding is available to government secondary schools to support students starting Year 7 in 2021 who are no longer eligible for the Program for Students with Disabilities (PSD) after their Year 6-7 Review.

The funding supports the delivery of personalised teaching and learning programs that respond to students' needs.

Schools are encouraged to use the Student Support Group (SSG) process to draw on the expertise of the group to formulate and commit to specific strategies and implementation plans that will support the student's educational needs, inclusion and engagement. The progress of the agreed strategies should be regularly reviewed at SSG meetings each term.

Eligibility

Schools with the following campus types are eligible for Transition Support Funding at school level:

  • Secondary
  • Primary/Secondary Combined
  • Special.

Funding is calculated at the Confirmed and Revised budget cycles, Funding is allocated through cash funding.

Use of funding

Transition Support Funding resources, in consultation with the Student Support Group, can be used to access:

  • consultation or support from specialist education or allied health staff
  • professional development
  • specialist equipment or materials.

Examples are provided below.

Transition Support Funding resources do not define or limit the support provided by a school for a student. It is the responsibility of the school, in consultation with parents/carers in the Student Support Group, to determine the specific nature of the support required, and schools are required to consider their total budget in supporting students with disability and diverse learning needs.

Transition Support Funding resources should not be targeted to students in receipt of supplementary funding through the Program for Students with Disabilities.

Calculation

Transition Support Funding is calculated on a pro-rata basis according to enrolment information provided by schools via the Program for Students with Disabilities Management System (PSDMS) in Term 1.

School principals will be emailed directly to detail Transition Support Funding allocations following the release of the Confirmed Student Resource Package.

If a school identifies a student for Transition Support Funding after Term 1, a pro-rata allocation will be considered. In these instances, schools are advised to log a request through the DET Services Portal.

Where a student in receipt of Transition Support Funding changes government schools during the year, schools should make local arrangements to transfer resources (including specialist equipment or materials).

Rates — 2021

Per eligible student (pro-rata) − Cash ($) $3,000

Examples for use of funding

In consultation with the Student Support Group, consideration can be given to providing more intense support at the beginning of the school year, or identifying equipment and materials that will be used over a longer period of time. For example:

For a student with behaviour support needs

Transition Support Funding may be used for professional development and consultation focused at the beginning of the school year. Transition Support Funding could be used to:

  • provide school staff with the necessary knowledge and skills
  • develop and implement Behaviour Support Plans and resources across the school
  • support other adjustments to the school environment as the student begins secondary school.

For a student with learning support needs

Transition Support Funding may be used to access specialist education or allied health support. This may identify specialist equipment and educational resources that the school can purchase for the student's personalised learning and support needs.

For a student with sensory or health support needs

Transition Support Funding may be used to purchase personal equipment or resources, specific to the student's needs that will enhance their access and participation in the school's educational programs.

Further information


Special School Complexity Allowance (Reference 18)

Special School Complexity Allowance (Reference 18)

Specialist school complexity allowance will apply to specialist schools receiving per capita student based core index and Program for Student with Disabilities level 1-6 allocations.

Specialist school complexity allowance is calculated once a year (confirmed budget cylcle) by multiplying the Core Index enrolment totals (Reference 5) by a school specific index point from the chart below. The index point is determined by calculating the weighted mean of the Students with Disabilities index levels 1-6 in the school at Term 1.

An example of the Special School Complexity Allowance calculation can be seen below.

Example — Special School Complexity Allowance calculation to derive the index point

PSD Level No of Students Weighting Value PSD Level x No. of Students
1 10 10
2 15 30
3 5 15
4 5 20
5 5 25
6 5 30
No. of Students 45 130

Index point = 130 (weighted value) / 45 (no. of students) = 2.9

Supplementation per student = $949.10 (from rates table for index point 2.9)

Special School Complexity Allowance = $949.10 x 45 = $42,709.50

Eligibility

Schools with the following campus types are eligible for the specialist school complexity allowance:

  • Day Special
  • Special Development
  • Disability
  • Special
  • Furlong Park School for Deaf Children.

Calculation

Special School Complexity Allowance = Core Index enrolment × Supplementation per Student

Index Point Rates — 2021
Index Point Supplementation per Student ($) Index Point Supplementation per Student ($) Index Point Supplementation per Student ($)
1.0 242.80 2.7 874.80 4.4 1,506.80
1.1 279.90 2.8 911.90 4.5 1,543.90
1.2 317.10 2.9 949.10 4.6 1,581.10
1.3 354.30 3.0 986.30 4.7 1,618.30
1.4 391.50 3.1 1,023.50 4.8 1,655.50
1.5 428.60 3.2 1,060.60 4.9 1,692.70
1.6 465.80 3.3 1,097.80 5.0 1,729.80
1.7 503.00 3.4 1,135.00 5.1 1,767.00
1.8 540.20 3.5 1,172.20 5.2 1,804.20
1.9 577.30 3.6 1,209.30 5.3 1,841.30
2.0 614.50 3.7 1,246.50 5.4 1,878.50
2.1 651.70 3.8 1,283.70 5.5 1,915.70
2.2 688.90 3.9 1,320.90 5.6 1,952.90
2.3 726.10 4.0 1,358.10 5.7 1,990.10
2.4 763.20 4.1 1,395.20 5.8 2,027.20
2.5 800.40 4.2 1,432.40 5.9 2,064.40
2.6 837.60 4.3 1,469.60 6.0 2,101.60


Paramedical and Interpreter Staff Salaries (Reference 19)

Paramedical and Interpreter Staff Salaries (Reference 19)

Paramedical and Interpreter Staff funding is allocated to deaf facilities with secondary enrolments. The funding is inclusive of on costs (9.75% superannuation and 5.45% payroll tax), 1.35% leave loading, plus 1.5% for short-term relief costs.

Eligibility

Schools with the following campus types with secondary enrolments are eligible for Interpreter funding at campus level:

  • Deaf*

Funding is calculated at the Indicative, Confirmed and Revised cycles and schools are provided as credit funding

Calculation details

Funding is allocated based on enrolments and resourcing model for deaf facilities.

Deaf schools with secondary enrolments are funded at a rate of 1 EFT for every 6 enrolments.

For example: A school with 8 secondary enrolments will be funded for 8 secondary enrolments divided by .6 EFT = (8/6) = 1.33 EFT (rounded)

*Deaf campuses must be attached to a primary, secondary or primary/secondary combined school.


Medical Intervention Support (Reference 20)

Medical Intervention Support (Reference 20)

Medical Intervention Support (MIS) funding supports schools to engage appropriately trained staff to assist students who require regular, complex medical support at school.

MIS funding is available to support schools to put in place the necessary work arrangements for the delivery of specialised assistance to these students. This involves engagement of appropriately trained Education Support (ES) staff to undertake duties and responsibilities for delivering supporting procedures, consistent with Level 1, Range 2 of the ES Class.

The ES staff member must have undergone specific training to support the student’s medical needs. Training may be provided by an appropriate healthcare provider, or through the Schoolcare Program.

Eligibility

Schools with the following campus types are eligible for Medical Intervention funding at campus level:

  • Primary
  • Secondary
  • Primary /Secondary Combined
  • Special.

Funding is calculated for each of the four school terms and is allocated through credit funding.

Rates — 2021

Rate per eligible student: $14,013

Medical Intervention Support is allocated on a pro rata basis according to applications received from schools and the enrolment of an eligible student.

In cases where the student transfers to another school, an application for Medical Intervention Support is required from the new school.

Further information

Medical Intervention Support guidelines are available at:


Special School Transport Administration (Reference 25)

Special School Transport Administration (Reference 25)

A Special School Transport Administration allocation is provided in recognition of the arrangements required to manage transport arrangements in consultation with bus contractors and parents.

Eligibility

  • Special Schools*
  • Autistic Schools

Funding is calculated for each of the 4 school terms, funding is allocated through cash funding.

Calculation

Funding is calculated based on enrolment ranges provided in the rates section below.

Example a school with 27 enrolments would fall into the 26 to 50 enrolment range.

Rates — 2021

  • Enrolment range 0 to 24: 2,638
  • Enrolment range 26 to 50: 3,301
  • Enrolment range 51+: 3,962

*Including primary, secondary and primary/secondary combined schools with a defined special school campus.


EAL Program Funding (Reference 26)

EAL Program Funding (Reference 26)

EAL program funding for primary and secondary schools in the Student Resource Package (SRP) consists primarily of EAL Index funding (Levels 1 to 5) and is provided to schools that meet a pre-determined threshold. Schools that experience an increase to their EAL student profile during the school year which takes them beyond that threshold are also eligible for EAL contingency funding. Refer to EAL Contingency (Reference 27).

EAL program funding for English language schools and centres in the SRP consists of funding to support a target number of students and provide services to newly arrived students who are not currently enrolled in a full-time new arrivals program. English language schools and centres that experience a significant increase to their enrolments during the school year may also be eligible for EAL contingency funding. Refer to EAL Contingency (Reference 27).

EAL Index funding (Levels 1 to 5)

EAL Index funding is made available to schools to staff EAL programs with appropriately qualified EAL teachers and Multicultural Education Aides (MEAs).

EAL Index funding is based on data collected from schools in the preceding August School Census. New schools that did not participate in the preceding August census can apply for contingency funding if their EAL student profile meets the EAL Index funding threshold.

Eligibility

  • Primary
  • Secondary
  • Primary/Secondary Combined

Allocation of EAL index funding

EAL Index funding is allocated to schools at campus level to provide EAL programs for students based on the number of students who:

  • come from a language background other than English
  • speak a language other than English at home as their main language
  • have been enrolled in an Australian school for less than five years
  • attract SRP funding.

Schools should plan programs that are sufficiently flexible to accommodate the changes that occur to their EAL populations during the school year. This can be due to new enrolments or students transferring or leaving.

Schools hosting intensive English language support programs (also known as outpost programs) should note that funding for teacher FTE for these programs is included in the English language school’s Student Resource Package.

Calculation

EAL funding is based on an integrated weighted index for primary and secondary students.

This is applied to the number of students identified in the August School census as meeting the EAL Index funding criteria.

A school’s EAL allocation includes a weighting based on the school’s densities of Student Family Occupations (SFO Weighting). Refer to reference 11 for the calculation of SFO.

The SFO Weighting reflects the high correlation between student outcomes and family occupation to target funding to schools with EAL learners with greatest need.

A campus is required to reach a threshold before funding will apply. Thresholds are applied separately to primary and secondary students for Pri/Secondary combined campuses.

Thresholds are determined by:

Rates – 2021

List 1: EAL Index funding thresholds

  • Primary: $25,626.98
  • Secondary: $48,877

List 2: Index levels and level descriptions

  • Level 1 — Foundation – weighting of 1.00 applied
  • Level 2 — 2 to 5 years in Australian school Years 1 to 6 – weighting of 2.00 applied
  • Level 3 — <2 years in Australian school Years 1 to 6 – weighting of 4.00 applied
  • Level 4 — 2 to 5 years in Australian school Years 7 to 12 – weighting of 5.09 applied
  • Level 5 — <2 years in Australian school Years 7 to 12 – weighting of 7.64 applied

List 3: Further weightings are applied to campuses based on the campus densities of Student Family Occupations (SFO)

  • Level 1 — where a SFO density is less than or equal to 52.73% (0.5273) – a 0.6 weight is applied
  • Level 2 — where a SFO density greater than 52.74% (0.5274) but less than or equal to 54.69% (0.5469) – a 1.00 weight is applied
  • Level 3 — where a SFO density is greater than or equal to 54.70% (0.5470) – a 1.40 weight is applied

The combined effect of Lists 1, 2 and 3 results in the following matrix:

List 4: Allocation matrix for total EAL index funding plus MEA

Level Description Weighting SFO Weighting 1 SFO Weighting 2 SFO Weighting 3
0.6
$
1.0
$
1.4
$
1 In year Foundation 1.00 $346.15 $576.92 $807.69
2 2 to 5 years in Australian school Years 1 to 6 2.00 $692.30 $1,153.85 $1,615.38
3 <2 years in Australian school Years 1 to 6 4.00 $1,384.61 $2,307.70 $3,230.75
4

2-5 years in Australian school Years 7 to 12

5.09 $1,761.91 $2,936.55 $4,111.13
5 <2 years in Australian school Years 7 to 12 7.64 $2,644.60 $4,407.69 $6,170.74 

*Due to rounding some rates do not multiply exactly by the weightings above.

Teacher salary charges to schools in 2021 will continue to be based on actual payroll debits for individual staff as reflected on eduPay. This includes the actual cost of annual leave loading and all allowances, such as higher duties and special payments. Also included are non-cash benefits for teachers.

List 5: Salary rates

Primary schools receive a total of 121,553 made up of:

  • Credit ($): 118,496
  • Cash ($): 3,057.

Secondary schools receive a total of 121,130 made up of:

  • Credit ($): 119,535
  • Cash ($): 1,595.

Other funding for EAL programs

If applicable, the following lines will also appear in a school’s SRP budget details.

EAL for Refugees — Primary and EAL for Refugees — Secondary Students

An additional loading is provided to campuses:

  • that receive EAL Index funding and
  • have an SFO weighting below 1.4 (this equates to an SFO density greater than 0.547) and
  • have 10 or more refugee students enrolled.

In these cases, the school is provided with funding for the refugee students at an SFO weighting of 1.4.

Funding for English language schools and centres

Funding for English language schools and centres is based on target enrolments established by the Learning, Teaching and Pathways Division in consultation with regions and schools and centres. Classes are funded at a student to teacher ratio of 13:1.

English language schools receive a per target enrolment rate and a base to provide both safety net and support. Both allocations are multiples of the rates that apply in standard settings.

English language centres are campuses of a primary or secondary school and the Virtual EAL New Arrivals Program Base support is provided by the primary or secondary school and the centre receives a per target enrolment rate.

Eligibility

  • English language schools
  • English language centres
  • Virtual EAL New Arrivals Program

2021 English language school and centre target enrolment rates

In an English language school, primary target enrolments receive a total of 12,741 made up of:

  • Credit ($): 11,901
  • Cash ($): 840.

In an English language school, secondary target enrolments receive a total of 15,485 made up of:

  • Credit ($): 14,615
  • Cash ($): 870.

In an English language centre, primary target enrolments receive a total of 13,494 made up of:

  • Credit ($): 12,747
  • Cash ($): 747.

In an English language centre, secondary target enrolments receive a total of 16,434 made up of:

  • Credit ($): 15,587
  • Cash ($): 847.

Multicultural Education Aides (MEAs)

An allocation for the employment of Multicultural Education Aides (MEAs) is made to English language schools and centres based on target enrolments. The current student to MEA ratio is 65:1. Campuses with target enrolments below 65 are entitled to a 1.0 FTE MEA and for campuses above 65 the 65:1 ratio applies.

The 2021 MEA rate is $61,177.00.

EAL student services

In addition, English language schools and centres receive funding to provide services to EAL students who are not yet or no longer enrolled in a full-time intensive program. These services include outreach services, transition support for high needs refugee students and delivery of outpost programs.


EAL Contingency (Reference 27)

EAL Contingency (Reference 27)

EAL Contingency funding is provided, budget allowing, to enable the employment of additional EAL teachers and Multicultural Education Aides where schools experience a significant increase to their EAL student profile after their EAL funding has been established for the year.

A ‘significant increase’ for a primary, secondary or combined primary/secondary school means that the cohort of additional students, based on the rates and weightings outlined in Reference 26, attract funding above the relevant EAL Index funding threshold (primary or secondary). This means there is no set number of students a school must enrol to be eligible for EAL Contingency. Each student’s year level and length of time in Australia determines the level of funding he or she attracts.

A ‘significant increase’ for an English language school or centre or the Virtual EAL New Arrivals Program is one which requires provision of an additional class.

Applications for contingency funding can be submitted at any time of the school year.

Eligibility

  • Primary
  • Secondary
  • Primary/Secondary Combined
  • English language schools
  • English language centres
  • Virtual EAL New Arrivals Program

Applications

Primary and secondary schools that have enrolled an increased number of students since their EAL Index funding was established by the preceding year’s August census may apply for EAL contingency funding. Each application is assessed based on the additional students’ eligibility for EAL Index level funding and the rates and weightings outlined in Reference 26.

New primary and secondary schools will not have participated in the preceding August census. They can apply for EAL contingency funding to establish their EAL program following the February school census.

To apply, primary and secondary schools should run a Contingency Report ST21038 from CASES21 and email this with a request to be considered for EAL contingency funding to the EAL Unit at eal@education.vic.gov.au. The ST21038 report is used to compare current enrolments with enrolments from the preceding August census to determine if an increase beyond the relevant threshold has been reached. Applications from new schools are assessed based on the student numbers in the ST21038 report.

English language schools and centres should use the Request for EAL Contingency Funding for New Arrivals Provision form to discuss changed provision needs with their Regional Service Support Branch Manager, then email the form to: eal@education.vic.gov.au

Schools that apply within the first five weeks of term and meet eligibility requirements are funded for that term and any other remaining terms in the school year.

Schools that apply in week 6 or beyond and meet eligibility requirements are funded for the following and any remaining terms of the school year.

All schools are notified when their request has been assessed, with further notification of their total funding after it has been approved. Payment is made through the Student Resource Package (SRP) at the end of each applicable term.

Calculation

EAL Contingency = FTE allocation * Average teacher rate

For primary and secondary schools, EAL contingency is calculated based on the change in the school’s EAL student profile between the previous August census and the date of application, as outlined above.  Any additional entitlement to EAL Index funding using the levels and weightings outlined in Reference 26, is converted to FTE and paid pro-rata for the remainder of the school year.

Primary and secondary FTE allocations are calculated separately.

For English language schools and centres and the Virtual EAL New Arrivals Program, each additional class to be provided attracts 1.0 FTE at the average teacher rate, paid pro-rata for the period for which the class will be required.

Rates — 2021

List 1: EAL Index funding thresholds

  • Primary — $25,627
  • Secondary — $48,877

Thresholds are determined by:

List 2: Average Teacher Rates

Primary schools receive a total of $121,553 made up of:

  • Credit ($): 118,496
  • Cash ($): 3,057

Secondary schools receive a total of $121,130 made up of:

  • Credit ($): 119,535
  • Cash ($): 1,595

Teacher salary charges to schools will continue to be based on actual payroll debits for individual staff as reflected on eduPay. This includes the actual cost of annual leave loading and all allowances, such as higher duties and special payments. Also included are non-cash benefits for teachers.

EAL Contingency (Cluster funding)

Primary and secondary schools that coordinate EAL cluster programs are provided with funding to employ EAL specialists to provide advice and guidance to teachers in cluster schools to build their understanding, knowledge and capacity to meet EAL student learning needs.


Disability Inclusion Tier 2 school-level funding (Reference 137)

Disability Inclusion Tier 2 school-level funding (Reference 137) 

The Disability Inclusion reform package will introduce a new funding and support model for students with disability over a staged rollout between 2021 to 2025. Refer to: Disability Inclusion Funding and Support.

Tier 2 school-level funding builds on the core student learning allocation funding by recognising that additional funding will further strengthen school capacity (staff time and resources) and capability (staff skills and knowledge) to better meet the needs of students with disability. This also recognises that to meet the diverse needs of students with disability, increasing frequency and intensity of support can be required.

It is important to note that Tier 2 school-level funding builds on the quality teaching and differentiated practice for all students, including students with disability delivered through core student learning allocation funding.

Schools will use Tier 2 funding to develop more inclusive education environments, with flexibility to tailor support to their local context and needs of their student cohort. Refer to the Disability Inclusion Funding and Support Guidance tab for Tier 2 funding and support implementation.

Schools must make reasonable adjustments to ensure that students with disability can access and participate in education on the same basis as students without disability, regardless of the availability of additional funding. Refer to: Students with Disability.

Eligibility

The following school types are eligible for Tier 2 school-level funding:

  • Primary
  • Secondary
  • Primary/Secondary Combined
  • Specialist.

Funding is allocated as a credit and cash allocation.

Tier 2 school-level formula

Tier 2 funding is calculated using a formula, which is comprised of 2 parts:

  • Part 1: a base funding component, which ensures all schools have a basic level of resources required to enhance overall school-level capacity to provide inclusive education and engage in new Disability Inclusion processes.
  • Part 2: a variable funding component, which builds on the base component to provide additional resources calculated based on the school’s characteristics, to support schools to further enhance capacity and strengthen adjustments for students with disability. This means schools will have resources to continue to build school capacity in line with their unique school attributes. Funding in this component varies across schools based on the estimated prevalence of need for adjustment at a school level.

Part 1: Base funding component

This component allocates each school a ‘base amount’ based on enrolments that increases linearly up to 100 enrolments, as outlined below:

  • schools with 5 students or less, the base amount is $5,100
  • schools with between 6 and 99 enrolments, the base amount is $5,100 + (number enrolments − 5) × $268.42
  • schools with 100 students or more, the base amount is capped at a maximum of $30,600*.

*Due to their special circumstances, the capping of $30,600 will not apply to the total base allocation of a mainstream school which also has a special development campus. The base allocation will be calculated separately for enrolments of special development campuses of mainstream schools.

Part 2: Variable funding component

The variable funding component takes the characteristics of students in a school and uses these measures to calculate an allocation of funding. This component is calculated based on:

  • an index, calculated using statistical weights based on:
    • student family education (SFE) – which is an indicator of socio-educational disadvantage
    • school type (primary)
    • school size (small school with less than 100 enrolments)
  • number of enrolled students
  • a variable funding rate.

The index value is multiplied by the number of enrolments in the school and the variable funding rate to calculate the school-level funding amount.

Index calculation

The index is calculated using the weights for the index categories outlined in table 1 below. The weights are used directly within the funding formula.

For SFE, the weight is multiplied by the share of students in each SFE category (SFE 1 to SFE 7).

Weights result in the allocation of relatively more funding to schools with those attributes.

Each school’s index value is updated each year based on the latest available data.

Table 1: Index categories and weightings
Index categories Weighting
SFE 1, 2 (Year 9 or below or Year 10 or equivalent) 0.1800
SFE 3, 4 (Year 11 or equivalent or Year 12 or equivalent) 0.1158
SFE 5 (Certificate I to IV) 0.1127
SFE 6, 7 (Diploma or above) 0.0117
School enrolments (<100 enrolments) 0.0202
Primary school 0.0348

Tier 2 school-level funding calculation

Total Tier 2 school-level funding is calculated as:

Base funding component + (Index × Enrolments × Variable Funding Rate).

Where: the variable funding rate for 2021 is $2,200.

Note, for schools in the Bayside Peninsula, Barwon and Loddon Campaspe areas as well as 5 specific supported inclusion schools: the 2021 Semester 2 allocation of Tier 2 school-level funding does not necessarily represent half of the 2022 allocation. For these schools, 2022 allocations will be communicated as part of the indicative SRP release in September or October 2021.  

Example of Tier 2 school-level funding calculation for a school

Consider a primary school with 90 enrolments and the following SFE distribution: 15% of enrolments are in SFE 1 and SFE 2 category; 15% of enrolments are in SFE 3 and SFE 4 category; 25% of enrolments are in SFE 5 category; 45% of enrolments are in SFE 6 and SFE 7 category.

Base calculation

The base would be calculated as:

$5,100 + (90 − 5 enrolments = 85 enrolments) × $268.42 = $27,915.70

Index calculation

The index would be calculated as:

(15% × 0.1800) + (15% × 0.1158) + (25% × 0.1127) + (45% × 0.0117) + (1 × 0.0202) + (1 × 0.0348) = 0.1328

Total annual school allocation

Total Tier 2 funding for the example school would be:

$27,915.70 + (0.1328 × 90 × $2,200) = $54,210*

*Note this value includes salary on-costs. The central on-costs are not reflected in school budgets.


Resources

Resources

School student resource package (SRP) interactive site (requires password) 

To see budget and planner reports for principals and delegates, login to student resource package

Current SRP guidance


Reviewed 21 May 2020