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education.vic.gov.au

Reporting Student Achievement and Progress Foundation to 10

Policy last updated

7 May 2021

Scope

  • Schools

Contact

Arts, Assessment and Reporting Unit, Learning and Teaching Division


Date:
January 2020

Policy

Including EAL students

Due to the disruption caused by COVID-19, student reporting deadlines have been extended for schools if required.

  • The original deadline of Friday 26 June for schools to provide student reports to parents and carers has been extended to the second week of Term 3, Friday 23 July for schools if required.
  • Schools must upload teacher judgments for achievement standards for each curriculum area taught in the reporting cycle in  CASES21 (staff login required) by Wednesday 28 July.

All Victorian government schools must now use the new Victorian Curriculum F-10 English as an Additional Language (EAL) curriculum for EAL students and report directly against the Victorian Curriculum F-10 achievement standards. Refer to EAL Support and Funding.

Policy

This policy outlines school obligations relating to student reporting across Foundation to Year 10 (including English as an additional language students) to parents/carers, the Department and the wider community

Summary

  • Schools are required to formally report student achievement and progress to parents/carers at least twice per school year for each student enrolled at the school.
  • The report must be a written report (print or digital), be in an accessible form and be easy for parents/carers to understand.
  • Schools must report directly against the Victorian Curriculum F-10 achievement standards.
  • Both student achievement and progress must be included in the report.
  • Opportunities must be provided for parents/carers and students to discuss the school report with teachers and/or school leaders.
  • The Department does not prescribe a reporting format.
  • Schools must upload their student achievement data via CASES21 twice yearly — by 30 June and 31 December each year.
  • Student reports must be kept for identified time periods. In some cases, student reports are considered permanent records, which prohibits their disposal.

Details

Requirements for student reporting in Victorian government schools are defined with reference to:

Reporting to parents/carers

Schools are required to formally report student achievement and progress to parents/carers at least twice per school year for each student enrolled at the school. The report must be:

  • a written report (print or digital)
  • in an accessible form, and
  • easy for parents/carers to understand.

Schools must report directly against the Victorian Curriculum F-10 achievement standards.

Both student achievement and progress must be included in the report.

A five-point scale must be used when reporting on student achievement and progress:

  • this requirement cannot be met by using the existing levels of the curriculum
  • for English, Mathematics and Science, at least an age-related five-point scale is required
  • for all other curriculum areas, including English as an Additional Language (EAL), an age-related scale is not required however another kind of five-point scale must be used (for example, a scale developed around learning goals or learning dimensions)
  • more than one scale may be used for the same learning area or capability.

Opportunities must be provided for parents/carers and students to discuss the school report with teachers and/or school leaders.

Interpreting services are available for communicating with parents/carers who require assistance in understanding their child’s achievement and progress. Refer to Interpreting and Translation Services.

Note that there may be specific instances where a school decides in partnership with an individual student and their parents/carers that an alternative to a full report for that student is appropriate.

The Department does not prescribe a reporting format.

Further support, guidance and advice regarding student reporting can be found on the Guidance tab.

Reporting to the Department

Schools must upload their student achievement data via CASES21 twice yearly — by 30 June and 31 December each year.

Schools must record data in the Department’s specified format so that CASES21 can accept it.

There are 2 methods for recording data:

  • an import/export process utilising commercial reporting software, or
  • direct entry into CASES21.

If schools use commercial reporting software, they must ensure the vendor is compliant with the Department’s specified format.

This data is used by the Department to:

  • automate some reporting processes for schools — for example, preparation of the performance summary in each school’s annual report to the school community, which is a statutory requirement for every school
  • provide school improvement reports to school leaders so they can better understand student achievement and progress at the cohort levels and across the whole school — such reports can help inform school strategic planning and review
  • identify characteristics and trends in data across schools that may need to be investigated or attended to by the Department (for example, a sharp increase or decline in achievement at the highest levels in one or more learning areas).

A step-by-step process for preparing student achievement data and sending summary results to the Department is provided in the CASES21 Administration User Guide Chapter 23 — Student Achievement (staff login required).

Records management

Student reports are records. In some case, they are considered permanent records, which prohibits their disposal.

Student reports must be kept for the following time periods:

  • Prep to Year 8 (all reports): 6 years after student departure
  • Year 9 to 12 reports (excluding final report): 30 years after student departure
  • Year 9 to 12 reports (final report): A permanent record — must be kept in the school until a transfer to the Public Record Office Victoria (PROV) is arranged by the Department.

For further information on records management in schools refer to Records Management — School Records.

Definitions

CASES21
The software component of the Computerised Administrative System Environment for Schools

English as an additional language (EAL) student
A student for whom English is an additional language (EAL) is a student who:

  • comes from a language background other than English
  • speaks a language other than English as their main language at home
  • may or may not attract EAL index funding

Contact

Arts, Assessment and Reporting Unit, Learning and Teaching Division


Guidance

Guidance for reporting student achievement and progress Foundation to Year 10

This guidance is provided to assist schools to report achievement and progress to parents/carers, the Department and the school community. Information, examples, and checklists are provided to support schools to meet the requirements to report and record student achievement and progress as well as information and advice to inform and enhance the report writing process including making teacher judgements and involving students.

The guidance contains the following chapters:

  • Reporting to parents and carers — general information
  • Reporting to parents and carers — students with a disability and/or additional learning needs
  • Reporting to parents and carers — EAL students
  • Guidance for reporting at each learning stage
  • Reporting to the Department
  • Records management 
  • Student reports and parent/carer-teacher-student conferences
  • Making teacher judgements and assigning scores for student reporting
  • Involving students in assessment and reporting processes
  • Student portfolio and reporting
  • Developing and reporting on individual learning goals

Information and guidance on assessing student achievement and progress is available at Assessment of Student Achievement and Progress Foundation to 10.


Reporting to parents and carers — general information

Reporting to parents and carers — general information

Written reports twice a year

Schools are required to provide a written (print or digital) student report at least twice a year to the parents or carers of each child enrolled at the school.

This is a minimum requirement for school registration — schools have a legal obligation to provide a written (print or digital) student report at least twice a year to the parents/carers of each child enrolled at the school.

Reports must be accessible

Student reports are required to be in an accessible form and easy for parents or carers to understand.

Parents want to know what was learnt and how well, where improvement is needed and what should be done next. This means that reports should be written in plain English, giving parents and carers a clear picture of their child’s progress and achievement against clearly defined standards.

The Department advises:

  • Comments about student achievement should complement the teacher judgements made and the corresponding five point scale used.
  • Descriptions of strengths and areas for improvement should provide more information on specific areas of the student’s achievement or where they need to be further assisted or extended.
  • The report can include an assessment of effort and class behaviour if the school chooses to report on this.
  • The use of generic comments should be avoided.

The following tips will assist you to write clear, easy to understand and informative reports.

This checklist is designed to help teachers review the comments they have written.

Reporting against achievement standards

Schools are required to report against the Victorian Curriculum F-10 achievement standards, which includes towards foundation levels A-D.

This means:

  • reporting directly against the achievement standards (not the level or band descriptions, or content descriptions)
  • reporting against the achievement standards defined for each learning area and capability taught, consistent with the teaching and learning program(s) schools have designed.

Each curriculum area includes content descriptions explaining what is to be taught, what students are expected to learn, and achievement standards describing what students are able to understand and do. Achievement standards (not content descriptions) are the basis for reporting student achievement.

The Victorian Curriculum F-10 achievement standards are provided in levels or bands for all the learning areas and capabilities. For more information see Victorian Curriculum F-10 structure.

For students who are progressing towards achieving the Foundation level achievement standards, the Towards Foundation levels of the Victorian Curriculum (levels A to D) are used to record levels of achievement. Levels A to D are a suitable record of levels of achievement for many students, including students with additional learning needs or a disability.

Student reports to include both achievement and progress

Both achievement and progress against the achievement standards are required to be included in the student report

Achievement means locating a student on a continuum of learning for a learning area and/or capability by making an on-balance, holistic, evidence-based and defensible judgement of assessment evidence gathered during a reporting period.

Progress means representing the growth in learning that has occurred by referencing the last time such achievement standards were reported against for that student in the school.

For an example, refer to achievement and progress along a continuum (Word, 58.1KB)

A five point scale must be used when reporting 

A five point scale is to be included in every student report to provide more detail on the student's learning and to rate the quality of the student's achievement and progress against the achievement standards.

This requirement provides an opportunity for schools to communicate quality information on the student’s learning growth — their increased skills, knowledge and understandings within the curriculum area of learning over time.

A five point scale may be a written or graphical scale that may employ letters, numbers, or worded-descriptors. If a worded descriptors are not used, the scale must be explained.

Note that:

  • This requirement cannot be met by using the existing levels of the curriculum.
  • For English, mathematics and science, at least an age-related five point scale is required.
  • For all other curriculum areas, including English as an Additional Language (EAL), another kind of five point scale may be used (for example, a scale developed around learning goals or learning dimensions).
  • More than one scale may be used for the same learning area or capability.

For more information and examples of five point scales (including examples relating to EAL students) refer to five point scale (Word).

Opportunities to discuss the school report 

Opportunities must be provided for parents/carers and students to discuss the school report with teachers and/or school leaders

This means that parent/carers need to receive the report with sufficient time before a school break commences so that parents and carers can discuss their child’s report with teachers and/or school leaders.

The Department does not prescribe a reporting format

Schools can decide on the format of reports in partnership with students, parents, carers and the school community. Reports can also be customised to suit school and individual student needs. For example, schools can choose to show levels of achievement and progress as a written or graphic representation.

Schools can decide how the following elements are represented:

  • student achievement against the Victorian Curriculum F-10 achievement standards
  • student progress along the learning continuum
  • student achievement and progress related to individual learning goals and targets.

Schools can customise other elements including:

  • areas for improvement/future learning
  • what the school will do to support the student’s learning
  • what parents and carers can do to support the student’s progress
  • attendance
  • work habits assessment
  • extra-curricular comments
  • student comment
  • parent and carer comment/feedback.

For examples of report formats, refer to student report format (Word, 41.2KB)


Reporting to parents and carers — students with a disability and/or additional learning needs

Reporting to parents and carers — students with a disability and/or additional learning needs

Schools are required to report on the achievement of all students including those with a disability and/or additional learning needs.

Schools have the flexibility to determine the most appropriate way to report student achievement and progress to parents for students with a disability and/or additional learning needs. When reporting the achievement and progress for students with a personalised learning and support plan, schools can:

  • use the full student report format they have customised or components of it
  • choose a different way of reporting progress that is better suited to the individual student’s needs, ensuring that all curriculum areas taught are reported on.

For students with personalised learning and support planning, learning progress will be reported against curriculum area achievement standards and/or against documented learning expectations as identified in their plan. Teacher judgements will be based on evidence collected through the reporting period. Schools can report on a student’s progress anywhere on the learning continuum between level A to level 10.

Student reports should describe progress in curriculum areas and reflect the assessment criteria and goals indicated in the student's plan. Comments should include a clear outline of the action that will be taken to support improved learning outcomes.

For reporting advice relating to students with disabilities and additional learning needs with personalised learning and support planning, refer to the VCAA Students with Disabilities Guidelines.

Advice and support is available at Abilities Based Learning and Education Support.


Reporting to parents and carers — EAL students

Reporting to parents and carers — EAL students

The progress of English as an Additional Language (EAL) students in learning English should be reported against the levels of the Victorian Curriculum F-10 EAL Achievement Standards rather than the Levels of the English Achievement Standards.

The Victorian Curriculum F-10 EAL Reporting Resource, developed by the Department, allows teachers and schools to report on the English language proficiency of students before they reach the achievement standards. This resource is designed to complement and support the Victorian Curriculum F-10 EAL. As EAL students may not reach the achievement standard described by the curriculum for more than one reporting cycle, teachers can demonstrate that during this time students are making satisfactory progress in learning English as an additional language. The resource allows teachers to use Beginning (.1), Consolidating (.2) and Achieved (.3) proficiency levels for assessment and reporting purposes for EAL students.

All third-party software providers will continue to enable teachers and schools to use the .1, .2 and .3 descriptors in student reporting.

The length of time during which a student will be assessed against the EAL standards depends on many factors, such as the:

  • existing English language proficiency of the student
  • number of years of schooling completed
  • level of literacy in their first language, and
  • background experiences.

Teachers should continue to use the EAL standards, if:

  • a teacher’s assessment of an EAL student against the English achievement standards places the student well below their peers, and
  • the student still requires substantial support in learning English as an additional language.

It is not appropriate for an EAL student to be assessed against:

  • the English standards in one language mode, such as Speaking and Listening, and
  • the EAL standards in other language modes.

While the oral language proficiency of an EAL student may appear to correspond to that of their peers, as students progress through the year levels, the demands of the curriculum become more complex, and these students can struggle to cope with the academic requirements of the English curriculum.

Students can be transferred to the Victorian Curriculum F-10 English for assessment and reporting purposes once they have reached the end of their respective A, B or C Pathway, and achieved the standard in all 3 language modes of:

  • Speaking and Listening
  • Reading and Viewing
  • Writing.

The curriculum companion resources provide more detailed advice about when to transfer students, and information about the typical pathways EAL students might follow along the Victorian Curriculum F-10.

EAL teachers should use a range of assessment data and strategies to inform their judgements regarding EAL students’ progress. For more information about the assessment of EAL students, refer to Tools for Enhancing Assessment Literacy for teachers of English as an Additional Language students (TEAL).

The format of the report for EAL students can be modified to reflect their achievement and progress. This will be determined by the school, in partnership with parents and carers.

As students begin to demonstrate appropriate knowledge and understanding of the curriculum content and they can express their understanding of ideas and information well enough in English, the same reporting format and approach as for other students can be used.

Interpreting services are available for communicating with parents and carers who require assistance in understanding their child’s progress. Refer to Interpreting and Translation Services.


Guidance for reporting at each learning stage

Guidance for reporting at each learning stage

The VCAA F-10 Reporting Guidelines provides guidance to meet the minimum requirements for student reporting. Below is a summary from the Guidelines of the minimum requirements of reporting against the achievement standards at each learning stage:

For more information on reporting against the achievement standards at the different stages please refer to the VCAA F-10 Revised curriculum planning and reporting guidelines.


Reporting to the Department

Reporting to the Department

Schools must upload their student achievement data twice a year 

Schools must upload their student achievement data via CASES21 twice yearly — by 30 June and 31 December each year.

Schools must record data in the Department’s specified format so that CASES21 can accept it.

There are 2 methods for recording achievement data:

  • an import/export process utilising commercial reporting software
  • direct entry into CASES21

Achievement data is reported in the Annual Report to the school community. This data is extracted by the Department and pre-populated into the Annual Report template. Schools can view the data they have uploaded via CASES21 in the School Information Portal.

Student reporting software packages provided by commercial suppliers enable schools to report on student achievement against the Victorian Curriculum F-10 achievement standards, as reflected in the school's teaching and learning plan.

If schools use a reporting software vendor, they must ensure the vendor is compliant with the Department’s specified format.

The reporting software must include certain functional specifications in order to meet the minimum mandatory requirements for:

  • reporting student achievement to the Department and
  • producing student reports for parents and carers

Software packages enable customisation of report formats to suit schools’ and individual students' needs. Schools are advised to contact their reporting software vendors to discuss their school’s needs.

Using software from a commercial supplier is not mandatory. Schools may elect to develop their own version for importing the data into CASES21.

Schools with very small student enrolments, including special developmental schools, can manually enter achievement data into CASES21 for reporting to the Department. This process is not able to be used to generate student reports for reporting to parents and carers. Information on the direct entry method is found in the annual CASES21 administration user guide.​

A step-by-step process for preparing student achievement data and sending summary results to the Department is provided in the CASES21 administrative guide, chapter 23, student achievement (staff login required).

Schools should contact the service desk prior to the end of the year if they have data-entry concerns.

Self service: Services Portal (staff login required)
Phone: 1800 641 943
Email: servicedesk@education.vic.gov.au


Records management

Records management

Student reports must be kept for identified time periods.

Schools are required to create, manage and dispose of electronic and hardcopy public records — for example, student records, in accordance with the Public Records Act 1973 (Vic).

Schools should have a system for managing their electronic and hardcopy records to ensure the:

  • authenticity
  • security
  • reliability, and
  • accessibility of these records

Where public records are stored with an online service — for example: 

  • services that provide virtual spaces, and
  • portals through which
    • information can be stored and shared, and
    • transactions between schools and parents/carers can be recorded, for example, cloud technologies

a school must be able to access those records during the retention period.

Student reports must be kept for the following time periods:

  • Prep to Year 8 (all reports): 6 years after student departure
  • Year 9 to 12 reports — excluding final report: 30 years after student departure
  • Year 9 to 12 reports — final report: A permanent record — must be kept in the school until a transfer to the Public Record Office Victoria is arranged by the Department

For further information on records management in schools, refer to Records Management — School Records.


Student reports and parent/carer-teacher-student conferences

Student reports and parent/carer-teacher-student conferences

Purpose of conferences

Parent/carer-teacher-student conferences provide valuable opportunities for the teacher, student, parents and/or carers to share and learn more about the student socially, emotionally and academically.

They are a good way to establish and maintain collaborative relationships between parents/carers, teacher and student, regarding the student’s academic achievement, learning and wellbeing. 

Conferences provide opportunities for:

  • building positive relationships
  • sharing information about the student’s interests and learning behaviours
  • sharing information about the student’s health and wellbeing
  • student agency, through showcasing their work
  • providing specific feedback on student achievement and progress
  • talking more in-depth about the student’s report
  • understanding more about how to support the student in their learning
  • establishing goals for improved learning and achievement in the future.

Preparation for conferences

Leadership level

The school should decide on the processes and protocols of the conferences in consultation with the school community. Conferences can be offered twice a year, at least once for each semester of the school year.

School leadership teams should:

  • ensure the conferences are within the agreed working hours for teachers and that teachers have allocated break times during the conferencing period
  • have process and protocols in place to guide the conferences, for example, setting an appropriate date, length of conferences, appropriate space for conferences, follow up processes if parents/carers cannot or do not attend the conferences
  • ensure the conferences are purposeful and timely, for example, if one of the intents is to discuss student reports, then they would need to be held shortly after reports are received
  • provide plenty of notice to parents/carers of the date(s) of conferences, so they have ample time to organise to attend
  • provide seated waiting areas for early arrivals
  • set up a system to enable parents/carers to select conference time(s) that are suitable for them
  • ensure school leaders are available to attend conferences if needed.

Teacher level

Before the conference, teachers should:

  • ensure their schedule of conferences is at hand
  • organise a translator(s) if needed
  • collate learning evidence for each child, and have student workbooks or work samples available for viewing
  • have discussion questions ready which are aligned to the purpose of the conference.

During the conference teachers should:

  • greet the parent/carer and students and provide a brief overview of the purpose of the meeting
  • arrange a follow-up meeting with parents/carers if needed
  • avoid using teacher terms to ensure the parents/carers and students have a good understanding of all terms used
  • provide opportunities for the student to discuss their learning
  • provide opportunities for the parent/carer and students to ask questions or provide further information about the student
  • be positive; including the student’s areas of strength, as well as areas for growth
  • use evidence about the student’s learning and behaviour and, if necessary, ask somebody else to be there or nearby if needed
  • finish the meeting co-creating clear learning and behavioural goals to guide the next steps in student learning and achievement.

After the conference:

  • talk with the student about what was discussed and steps to improve their learning
  • follow up on any agreed actions and/or plan
  • continue to communicate with the parents/carers.

For more information

For schools:

For parents:


Making teacher judgements and assigning scores for student reporting

Making teacher judgements and assigning scores for student reporting

Teacher judgements form the basis of student reporting. 

Teachers make judgements about the student’s level of achievement against the achievement standards and determine scores that accurately reflect where the student is located on a learning continuum for all curriculum areas taught during the reporting period.

All students’ achievement can be recorded using a score. Using scores supports the monitoring of the student’s progress along the learning continuum. Scores are recorded using a value within the scoring range for the curriculum area being reported:

  • The scoring range for the Victorian Curriculum F-10 is A -11.0
  • The Towards Foundation Level A to D curriculum is used for students who are progressing towards achieving the Foundation level achievement standards
  • The Victorian Curriculum F-10 EAL scoring range is from:
    • A1.1 to A2.3 for students on the A pathway
    • BL.1 to B3.3 for students on the B pathway, and
    • CL.1 to C4.3 for students on the C pathway

When more than one teacher teaches the same curriculum area (learning area and/or capability) to a student during the reporting period, each teacher will make a judgement about where the student is located on the learning continuum.

The school’s moderation process should be used to determine the level of achievement to be reported and the score to be recorded or each teacher could record a score for the student’s level of achievement in the school’s reporting software.

A single score will be created by the software. This final score should be confirmed by the relevant teachers.

A ‘did not participate’ or ‘DNP’ is used when students are not being assessed in a curriculum area/strand/mode for the reporting period. Teachers would use a ‘DNP’ entry when they do not have a suitable amount of evidence of a student’s level of achievement, due to special circumstances, to make a defensible and on-balance judgement against the standards. Refer to:

Scores are recorded in the school’s student reporting software package or directly into CASES21, refer to Reporting to the Department chapter of these Guidelines.

Teachers are required to make informed and consistent judgements about student achievement and progress. These judgements inform the information presented in student reporting.

An on-balance, holistic, evidence-based and defensible judgement is made about where a student is located on the learning continuum. This is achieved through an ongoing process of:

  • gathering data from a variety of formal and informal tasks and learning experiences
  • gathering data over a period of time
  • analysing and interpreting the data
  • moderating with teachers against achievement standards and school defined and disseminated frames of reference such as scoring guidelines and assessment criteria

Student progress will be influenced by each school’s individual teaching and learning plan, and by factors such as time allocation and frequency of tasks. The school’s teaching and learning plan will identify what is taught, assessed and reported.

Teachers may consider co-developing indicative progress descriptions with students to assist with setting learning expectations of students and to assess and report student achievement.

An important aspect of curriculum planning is being able to articulate what student progress looks like, using the achievement standards in the curriculum continuum.

Visit VCAA curriculum area advice for: 

  • indicative progress templates
  • annotated indicative progress examples, and
  • student work samples for specific curriculum areas

For information about whole-school curriculum planning, visit VCAA curriculum planning resource.


Involving students in assessment and reporting processes

Involving students in assessment and reporting processes

Involving students in the assessment and reporting processes is critical so that students:

  • understand their current performance
  • monitor their progress, and
  • know what to do next to improve their learning

Quality student assessment underpins and forms the foundation upon which quality reporting can occur. Assessments embedded in the teaching and learning cycle inform the information provided to parents, carers and students in their reports. 

An important process of involving students is through giving and receiving feedback. Providing effective feedback is:

  • a key element of the incremental process of ongoing learning and assessment
  • a significant means of improving achievement in learning

Effective feedback is a two-way process that supports progress in learning and understanding about where the learners are on the learning continuum. It is:

  • timely
  • clear
  • focuses on improvement strategies, and
  • encourages reflection

Feedback can be from:

  • the teacher to student
  • student to teacher, or
  • peers

Student reporting is one type of feedback. 

Giving and receiving feedback as part of the reporting process means that the students have:

  • a clear picture of progress made to date
  • an understanding of their strengths and areas for improvement
  • the capacity to set individual learning goals and targets to achieve further improvement

For information on feedback and reporting, refer to VCAA feedback and reporting.


Student portfolio and reporting

Student portfolio and reporting

Portfolios can: 

  • assist teachers to make judgements about student achievement against the achievement standard that are
    • on-balance
    • holistic
    • evidence-based, and
    • defensible
  • support teachers and students to explain and share student progress

Using portfolios, teachers make judgments based on a planned and targeted selection of evidence of student learning collected during the reporting period. Examples in the student’s portfolio of work, such as assessment tasks, can be used to provide a greater level of detail of the student’s achievement and progress to parents and carers.

Schools are encouraged to use information directly from student portfolios when writing student reports, or by referring to the information contained in the portfolio on the student report.

For information on using digital portfolios, visit Digital portfolios.


Developing and reporting on individual learning goals

Developing and reporting on individual learning goals

Individual learning goals and targets aim to:

  • improve students’ learning and achievement, and
  • build students’ capacity to learn

Individual learning goals and targets motivate students to:

  • become more active participants in the learning process
  • become independent learners
  • identify what is important to their own learning
  • achieve their full potential

Research into the motivation and efficiency of students who set their own learning goals and targets indicates that students have more confidence to take on more challenging tasks, regardless of their ability.

Students tend to achieve more than when working on goals set for them by the teacher, with their motivation to improve and master a task increasing and their self-esteem remaining strong, even in the case of failure.

In the Foundation stage of schooling (Prep to Year 2), individual learning goals and targets may also relate to the 5 Outcomes of the Victorian Early Years Learning and Development Framework (VEYLDF). Visit Early childhood learning.

Schools can decide the best way to manage the development, monitoring and reporting of individual learning goals and targets. Developing, monitoring and reporting on learning goals and targets will generally work best when the process is clear and shared across the school. The process also involves conversations about learning between the student and the teacher. Planning for such conversations to occur in a productive and purposeful manner is critical to the success of this process.

When students are assisted to explore their own thinking and learning processes, they are drawn to think about the effectiveness of the strategies they used to achieve the learning goals they set. Planning what to do, monitoring progress towards achieving it and evaluating the outcome can help students take more control over their thinking and learning processes and equip them with learning to learn skills.

For more information, refer to:


Resources

Resources

The following resources are provided to assist schools to report student achievement and progress across Foundation to Year 10 to parents/carers, the Department and the school community.  

Reporting to Parents and Carers

The Victorian Curriculum and Assessment Authority (VCAA) provide guidelines and advice on the minimum requirements for reporting student achievement and progress to parents and carers:

Collection of information and advice on reporting to parents/carers and the Department:

Reporting advice relating to students with disabilities and additional learning needs with personalised learning and support planning:

An example of student report format: 

Tips to assist teachers to write clear, easy to understand and informative reports:

Checklist designed to help teachers review the comments they have written to ensure they are communicating the right type of information in an appropriate way:

Information and resources to support the implementation of the Victorian Curriculum F-10 including whole-school curriculum planning, assessment and reporting:

To support the development of indicative progress descriptions, VCAA has provided:

  • VCAA Curriculum area advice
    • indicative progress templates
    • annotated indicative progress examples, and
    • student work samples for specific curriculum areas 

Example of reporting achievement and progress along a continuum:

Information and examples of student reporting using five-point scales (including examples relating to EAL students):

A lookup matrix which may be useful for determining an A-E rating or equivalent scale for English, mathematics and science. The use of the lookup matrix is only effective for reporting at age-expected levels.

Reporting to the Department

Schools should contact the service desk prior to the end of the year if they have data-entry concerns:

Self service: Services Portal ( staff login required)
Phone: 1800 641 943
Email: servicedesk@education.vic.gov.au


Reviewed 14 April 2020