education.vic.gov.au

Policy last updated

7 December 2022

Scope

  • Schools

Date:
March 2020

Overview

Performance and Development Processes for 2024

The performance and development processes 2024 provide the opportunity for education support class to choose to undertake the Statement of Expectation process or the Performance and Development Plan (PDP) process.

2024 Statement of Expectation is available here.

Overview

Introduction

This policy sets out the requirement for education support class employees to develop a Performance and Development Plan (PDP).

  • All employees must have an agreed Performance and Development Plan (PDP) to cover the school year.
  • All employees will be assessed annually based on demonstrated achievement against school priorities, and progress through salary scales will be based on their performance and development assessment
  • The Performance and Development Guidelines are available under the Policy and Guidelines tab on this site.

Details

Under the Victorian Government Schools Agreement 2022External Link , employees are committed to performance and development processes that recognise and affirm high performance, address underperformance and value continuous high quality professional learning.

Employees must have an agreed PDP to cover the school year.

Education support employees must set four goals, comprising one for each of the three Domains of Education Support Practice (Knowledge, Practice, Engagement), in addition to one outcomes-focused goal about how education support employees are contributing to the School Strategic Plan or Annual Implementation Plan.

Salary progression is not automatic. Performance will be assessed annually against school priorities and Departmental criteria appropriate to the employee’s classification level and remuneration or salary range.

Employees who progress through their respective salary scales will be determined solely on their performance and development assessment.

The PDP Guidelines provide further detailed information to support employees to develop and reflect on their performance and development.

Relevant legislation


Policy and Guidelines

Performance and Development Guidelines for Education Support Class Employees

These Guidelines contain the following chapters:

  • 2021 Statement of Expectation for Education Support Class Employees
  • 2022 Statement of Expectation for Education Support Class Employees
  • 2023 Statement of Expectation for Education Support Class Employees
  • 2024 Statement of Expectation for Education Support Class Employees
  • Overview
  • The performance and development approach
  • Domains of Education Support Practice
  • Business Manager Capability Framework
  • Alignment with the Framework for Improving Student Outcomes
  • Performance and development cycle
  • Stage 1: Reflection and goal setting
  • Stage 2: Mid-cycle practice and learning
  • Stage 3: End-cycle feedback and review

2021 Statement of Expectation for Education Support Class Employees

2021 Statement of Expectation for Education Support Class Employees

The performance and development process in 2021 provides the opportunity for education support class employees to choose to undertake the standard Performance and Development Plan (PDP) process or an alternative Statement of Expectation. Staff selecting the Statement of Expectation process are not required to complete any routine documentation or monitoring in eduPay.

The 2021 Statement of Expectation for education support class employees is set out below. There is diversity and breadth in education support roles, and education support class employees are encouraged to consider how they contribute to these areas as appropriate to their role and setting. Owing to this breadth and diversity in education support roles, the application of the Statement of Expectation may focus on one, two or all three of the area below.

1. Learning

Education support class employees contribute to or support, as appropriate to their role, teaching and learning programs.

2. Wellbeing

Education support class employees collaborate with other school staff, as appropriate to their role, to support the planning and/or delivery of programs and supports for student health and wellbeing.

3. Connected schools

Education support class employees contribute to building community and strengthening positive partnerships with parents, carers and other individuals and groups within the wider school community, as appropriate to their role.

At the start of the cycle

  • Education support staff indicate to their reviewer if they will undertake the standard PDP process or the 2021 Statement of Expectation, at any time prior to 30 April 2021.
  • Education support staff discuss with their reviewers how their contributions accord with the 2021 Statement of Expectation.

Throughout the year

  • There will continue to be benefit in regular discussions between employees and reviewers.
  • Where there is a concern that an employee is not making an appropriate contribution to meet the Statement of Expectation, this concern should be raised with that employee in writing at the time the concern becomes apparent, and no later than 1 September 2021. Support must be provided to the employee and the opportunity to enable improvement in their contribution to meet the Statement of Expectation.

At the end of the cycle

  • At the end of semester 2, education support staff will reflect on and be acknowledged for their learning, growth and contribution to the Statement of Expectation with their reviewers.
  • It is assumed that education support class employees who opt-in to this process will meet the Statement of Expectation, in which case no action is required in eduPay.

2021 Statement of Expectation – Frequently asked questions

The following frequently asked questions have been developed to support school staff to implement the 2021 Statement of Expectation.

  • Question 1: How does the Statement of Expectation process reduce workload?

    The Statement of Expectation reduces workload in 2 ways:

    • the process itself is less intensive, as it is focused on discussion between the employee and the reviewer
    • no routine documentation to support the process is required to be supplied or completed by the employee.

    Question 2: Is the Statement of Expectation applicable to employees working from regional or area offices? For example, Leadership Partners, Teaching Partners, Koorie Education Support Officers?

    The Statement of Expectation is only available to school-based employees who are located/employed in school locations, including:

    • teacher class
    • principal class
    • education support class
    • executive class principals employed in school-based roles.

    Positions that are employed from corporate locations, for example, area, regional, or central offices, including those who deliver support services in school locations, cannot undertake the Statement of Expectation. These employees include:

    • leading teacher or principal class staff who are regional employees (for example, Leadership Partner roles, Teaching Partner roles)
    • Koorie Education Support Officers (KESOs)
    • Student Support Services Officers (SSSOs)
    • Visiting Teachers
    • executive class principals employed in corporate locations.

    Question 3: When an employee decides to undertake the Statement of Expectation process, is eduPay used to record this decision and other information related to the process?

    The Statement of Expectation is discussion based and does not require the use of eduPay to record this decision, or any other information about an employee’s Statement of Expectation. Employees indicate to their reviewer if they will undertake the standard PDP process or the 2021 Statement of Expectation process at any time prior to 30 April 2021.

    Question 4: How does the Statement of Expectation differentiate between expected contributions by employees in different roles and settings?

    The Department acknowledges the breadth and diversity of school-based roles and the ways that employees contribute to the Statement of Expectation will vary depending on their role and setting. For example, employee contributions may vary depending on the stage of career or specific role of the individual, the type of school they are in, for example primary, secondary, special, or alternative setting, or location of the school.

    Employees and reviewers may draw on a range of resources to inform their understanding of what constitutes an appropriate contribution. These may include resources such as the employee’s role description and classification, Education Support Class dimensions of work, or whether they perform additional duties. Additionally, the Australian Professional Standards for Teachers and Principals may provide a valuable reference point for appropriate expectations for teacher class and principal class employees at different stages of their careers.

    Question 5: Are mid-cycle and end-of-cycle discussions required for employees who are undertaking the Statement of Expectation process?

    An end-of-cycle discussion is a requirement of the Statement of Expectation process. It provides employees an opportunity to reflect on, and be acknowledged for, their learning, growth, practice, and contribution to the Statement of Expectation with their reviewers. While not a requirement, employees and reviewers may continue to benefit from regular discussions.

    Question 6: How does an employee provide evidence of their successful contribution at the end of the Statement of Expectation process? Should the end-of-cycle discussion take a particular format?

    The Statement of Expectation process is discussion based. At the beginning of the cycle, employees discuss with their reviewers how their contributions accord with the Statement of Expectation. At the end of semester 2, employees will reflect on, and be acknowledged for, their learning, growth, practice, and contribution to the Statement of Expectation with their reviewers. The format of discussions may vary depending on the school’s approach.

    Question 7: Can a reviewer ask an employee to provide routine documentation as part of the Statement of Expectation process?

    The Statement of Expectation is a discussion-based process; therefore, employees cannot be asked to provide routine documentation.

    If a reviewer has concerns that an employee is not making an appropriate contribution to the Statement of Expectation, refer to Question 12 for more information.

    Question 8: Can reviewers ask teachers to present team research or projects to demonstrate their contribution to the Statement of Expectation?

    As the Statement of Expectation is discussion based, a teacher cannot be asked to provide any routine documentation as part of the process, including documentation of involvement in research or other projects. This does not prevent teachers from voluntarily providing documentation as evidence of their contribution.

    Question 9: If an education support class employee’s role and responsibilities do not cover all 3 Statement of Expectation areas (Learning; Wellbeing; Connected schools), can they still successfully meet the Statement of Expectation?

    Yes. There is diversity and breadth in education support roles, and reviewers and education support class employees are encouraged to consider how they contribute to some, or all, of these areas as appropriate to their role and setting. Owing to this breadth and diversity, the application of the Statement of Education may focus on one, two or all three of the Statement of Expectation areas (Learning; Wellbeing; Connected schools), as determined by the employee.

    Question 10: What is the relationship between a school’s key improvement strategies and the Principal Class Statement of Expectation?

    While key improvement strategies are explicitly mentioned in the Learning area of the Principal Class Statement of Expectation, the 2021 Priorities and key improvement strategies apply across all 3 areas of the Principal Class Statement of Expectation (Learning; Wellbeing; Connected schools).

    Question 11: How do the School Strategic Plan (SSP) and Annual Implementation Plan (AIP) inform a teacher’s contribution to the Statement of Expectation?

    A school’s SSP and AIP should be developed and shared with its teachers and used by teachers to inform their contribution to the Statement of Expectation.

    Appropriate links between the SSP, the AIP, and a teacher’s Statement of Expectation ensures that each school aligns and acknowledges the efforts of all of its employees towards the shared goal of school improvement, and that each person understands their contribution, as appropriate to their role and setting, in working towards the 2021 Priorities.

    Question 12: What is the process if a reviewer is concerned an employee is not making an appropriate contribution to the Statement of Expectation?

    Where there is a concern that an employee is not making an appropriate contribution to meet the Statement of Expectation, this concern should be raised with the employee in writing at the time the concern becomes apparent, and no later than 1 September 2021. This ensures the employee has a minimum of 3 months after being notified to demonstrate that they have made an appropriate contribution.

    When notifying the employee, the reviewer must identify the areas where they believe the employee is not making an appropriate contribution and provide support to enable improvement. The employee will be expected to provide evidence, which may be written or verbal, to demonstrate they have addressed the area(s) of concern.

    These processes are effective when employees are provided with meaningful feedback, so they can reflect and improve their practice and obtain support to improve and develop their skills. For feedback to be constructive and effective, it is important that it is actionable, supported by examples, and provides substantial opportunities for improvement.

    Question 13: How do principals sign off on last year’s 2020 Statement of Expectation processes?

    If an employee undertaking the alternative process in 2020 had successfully contributed to the Statement of Expectation, no action was required by the principal; eduPay calculates progression eligibility and applies this from 1 May 2021.


2022 Statement of Expectation for Education Support Class Employees

2022 Statement of Expectation for Education Support Class Employees

The performance and development process in 2022 provides the opportunity for education support class employees to choose to undertake the standard Performance and Development Plan (PDP) process or an alternative Statement of Expectation. Staff selecting the Statement of Expectation process are not required to complete any routine documentation or monitoring in eduPay.

The 2022 Statement of Expectation for education support class employees is aligned to the key improvement strategies of learning and wellbeing. There is diversity and breadth in education support roles, and education support class employees are encouraged to consider how they contribute to these areas as appropriate to their role and setting. Owing to this breadth and diversity in education support roles, the application of the Statement of Expectation may focus on one or more aspects of each area below as appropriate.

1. Learning

Education support class employees contribute to or support, as appropriate to their role, the delivery of teaching, learning and assessment programs and resources. This will support school leaders and teachers to support student learning growth through the ongoing acquisition of knowledge, skills and capabilities defined by the Victorian Curriculum F-10 and senior secondary qualifications.

2. Wellbeing

Education support class employees collaborate with other school staff, as appropriate to their role, to support the planning and/or delivery of supports to strengthen student wellbeing. Education support class employees, as appropriate to their role, contribute to strengthening positive partnerships with parents, carers and other individuals and groups to support students’ participation in and sense of belonging in the school community. This will support school leaders and teachers to enable students to develop the capabilities necessary to thrive, contribute and respond positively to the challenges and opportunities of life.

At the start of the cycle

  • Education support staff indicate to their reviewer if they will undertake the standard PDP process or the 2022 Statement of Expectation process, at any time prior to 30 April 2022
  • Education support staff discuss how their contributions align with the 2022 Statement of Expectation

Throughout the year

  • The education support staff member and reviewer meet regularly throughout the year
  • Where there is a concern that an employee is not making an appropriate contribution to meet the Statement of Expectation this concern should be raised with the employee at the time the concern becomes apparent and no later than 1 September 2022 and provided in writing along with proposed improvement supports

At the end of the cycle

  • At the end of semester 2, education support staff will reflect on and be acknowledged for their learning, growth and contribution to the Statement of Expectation with their reviewers
  • It is assumed that education support class employees who opt-in to this process will meet the Statement of Expectation, in which case no action is required in eduPay

2022 Statement of Expectation – frequently asked questions

The following frequently asked questions have been developed to support school staff to implement the 2022 Statement of Expectation.

  • Question 1: How does the Statement of Expectation process reduce workload?

    The Statement of Expectation reduces workload in 2 ways:

    • the process itself is less intensive, as it is focused on discussion between the employee and the reviewer
    • no routine documentation to support the process is required to be supplied or completed by the employee.

    Question 2: Is the Statement of Expectation applicable to employees working from regional or area offices? For example, Leadership Partners, Teaching Partners, Koorie Education Support Officers?

    The Statement of Expectation is only available to school-based employees who are located/employed in school locations, including:

    • teacher class
    • principal class
    • education support class
    • executive class principals employed in school-based roles.

    Positions that are employed from corporate locations, for example, area, regional, or central offices, including those who deliver support services in school locations, cannot undertake the Statement of Expectation. These employees include:

    • leading teacher or principal class staff who are regional employees (for example, Leadership Partner roles, Teaching Partner roles)
    • Koorie Education Support Officers (KESOs)
    • Student Support Services Officers (SSSOs)
    • Visiting Teachers
    • executive class principals employed in corporate locations.

    Question 3: When an employee decides to undertake the Statement of Expectation process, is eduPay used to record this decision and other information related to the process?

    The Statement of Expectation is discussion based and does not require the use of eduPay to record this decision, or any other information about an employee’s Statement of Expectation. Employees indicate to their reviewer if they will undertake the standard PDP process or the 2022 Statement of Expectation process at any time prior to 30 April 2022.

    Question 4: How does the Statement of Expectation differentiate between expected contributions by employees in different roles and settings?

    The Department acknowledges the breadth and diversity of school-based roles and the ways that employees contribute to the Statement of Expectation will vary depending on their role and setting. For example, employee contributions may vary depending on the stage of career or specific role of the individual, the type of school they are in, for example primary, secondary, special, or alternative setting, or location of the school.

    Employees and reviewers may draw on a range of resources to inform their understanding of what constitutes an appropriate contribution. These may include resources such as the employee’s role description and classification, Education Support Class dimensions of work, or whether they perform additional duties. Additionally, the Australian Professional Standards for Teachers and Principals may provide a valuable reference point for appropriate expectations for teacher class and principal class employees at different stages of their careers.

    Question 5: Are mid-cycle and end-of-cycle discussions required for employees who are undertaking the Statement of Expectation process?

    An end-of-cycle discussion is a requirement of the Statement of Expectation process. It provides employees an opportunity to reflect on, and be acknowledged for, their learning, growth, practice, and contribution to the Statement of Expectation with their reviewers. While not a requirement, employees and reviewers may continue to benefit from regular discussions.

    Question 6: How does an employee provide evidence of their successful contribution at the end of the Statement of Expectation process? Should the end-of-cycle discussion take a particular format?

    The Statement of Expectation process is discussion based. At the beginning of the cycle, employees discuss with their reviewers how their contributions accord with the Statement of Expectation. At the end of semester 2, employees will reflect on, and be acknowledged for, their learning, growth, practice, and contribution to the Statement of Expectation with their reviewers. The format of discussions may vary depending on the school’s approach.

    Question 7: Can a reviewer ask an employee to provide routine documentation as part of the Statement of Expectation process?

    • The Statement of Expectation is a discussion-based process, therefore, employees cannot be asked to provide routine documentation
    • If a reviewer has concerns that an employee is not making an appropriate contribution to the Statement of Expectation, refer to Question 12 for more information

    Question 8: Can reviewers ask teachers to present team research or projects to demonstrate their contribution to the Statement of Expectation?

    As the Statement of Expectation is discussion based, a teacher cannot be asked to provide any routine documentation as part of the process, including documentation of involvement in research or other projects. This does not prevent teachers from voluntarily providing documentation as evidence of their contribution.

    Question 9: If an education support class employee’s role and responsibilities do not cover both Statement of Expectation areas (Learning and Wellbeing), can they still successfully meet the Statement of Expectation?

    Yes. There is diversity and breadth in education support roles, and reviewers and education support class employees are encouraged to consider how they contribute to some, or all, of these areas as appropriate to their role and setting. Owing to this breadth and diversity, the application of the Statement of Education may focus on one or more aspects of the Statement of Expectation areas (Learning and/or Wellbeing), as determined by the employee.

    Question 10: What is the relationship between a school’s key improvement strategies and the Principal Class Statement of Expectation?

    The Principal Class Statement of Expectation is aligned with the Framework for Improving Student Outcomes, and the 2022 Priorities Goal Key Improvement Strategies, Learning and Wellbeing.

    Question 11: How do the School Strategic Plan (SSP) and Annual Implementation Plan (AIP) inform a teacher’s contribution to the Statement of Expectation?

    A school’s SSP and AIP should be developed and shared with its teachers and used by teachers to inform their contribution to the Statement of Expectation.

    Appropriate links between the SSP, the AIP, and a teacher’s Statement of Expectation ensures that each school aligns and acknowledges the efforts of all of its employees towards the shared goal of school improvement, and that each person understands their contribution, as appropriate to their role and setting, in working towards the 2022 Priorities Goal.

    Question 12: What is the process if a reviewer is concerned an employee is not making an appropriate contribution to the Statement of Expectation?

    Where there is a concern that an employee is not making an appropriate contribution to meet the Statement of Expectation, this concern should be raised with the employee in writing at the time the concern becomes apparent, and no later than 1 September 2022. This ensures the employee has a minimum of 3 months after being notified to demonstrate that they have made an appropriate contribution.

    When notifying the employee, the reviewer must identify the areas where they believe the employee is not making an appropriate contribution and provide support to enable improvement. The employee will be expected to provide evidence, which may be written or verbal, to demonstrate they have addressed the area(s) of concern.

    These processes are effective when employees are provided with meaningful feedback, so they can reflect and improve their practice and obtain support to improve and develop their skills. For feedback to be constructive and effective, it is important that it is actionable, supported by examples, and provides substantial opportunities for improvement.

    Question 13: How do principals sign off on the 2021 Statement of Expectation process?

    If an employee undertaking the alternative process in 2021 has successfully contributed to the Statement of Expectation, no action is required by the principal; eduPay calculates progression eligibility and applies this from 1 May 2022.


2023 Statement of Expectation for Education Support Class Employees

2023 Statement of Expectation for Education Support Class Employees

The performance and development process in 2023 provides the opportunity for education support class employees to choose to undertake the standard Performance and Development Plan (PDP) process or an alternative Statement of Expectation. Staff selecting the Statement of Expectation process are not required to complete any routine documentation or monitoring in eduPay.

The 2023 Statement of Expectation for education support class employees is aligned to the key improvement strategies of learning and wellbeing. There is diversity and breadth in education support roles, and education support class employees are encouraged to consider how they contribute to these areas as appropriate to their role and setting. Owing to this breadth and diversity in education support roles, the application of the Statement of Expectation may focus on one or more aspects of each area below as appropriate.

1. Learning

Education support class employees contribute to or support, as appropriate to their role, the delivery of teaching, learning and assessment programs and resources. This will support school leaders and teachers to support student learning growth through the ongoing acquisition of knowledge, skills and capabilities defined by the Victorian Curriculum F-10 and senior secondary qualifications.

2. Wellbeing

Education support class employees collaborate with other school staff, as appropriate to their role, to support the planning and/or delivery of supports to strengthen student wellbeing. Education support class employees, as appropriate to their role, contribute to strengthening positive partnerships with parents, carers and other individuals and groups to support students’ participation in and sense of belonging in the school community. This will support school leaders and teachers to enable students to develop the capabilities necessary to thrive, contribute and respond positively to the challenges and opportunities of life.

At the start of the cycle

Education support staff indicate to their reviewer if they will undertake the standard PDP process or the 2023 Statement of Expectation process, at any time prior to 30 April 2023

Education support staff discuss how their contributions align with the 2023 Statement of Expectation

Throughout the year

The education support staff member and reviewer meet regularly throughout the year

Where there is a concern that an employee is not making an appropriate contribution to meet the Statement of Expectation this concern should be raised with the employee at the time the concern becomes apparent and no later than 1 September 2023 and provided in writing along with proposed improvement supports

At the end of the cycle

At the end of semester 2, education support staff will reflect on and be acknowledged for their learning, growth and contribution to the Statement of Expectation with their reviewers

It is assumed that education support class employees who opt-in to this process will meet the Statement of Expectation, in which case no action is required in eduPay

2023 Statement of Expectation – frequently asked questions

The following frequently asked questions have been developed to support school staff to implement the 2023 Statement of Expectation.

Frequently asked questions

  • Question 1: How does the Statement of Expectation process reduce workload?

    The Statement of Expectation reduces workload in 2 ways:

    • the process itself is less intensive, as it is focused on discussion between the employee and the reviewer
    • no routine documentation to support the process is required to be supplied or completed by the employee.

    Question 2: Is the Statement of Expectation applicable to employees working from regional or area offices? For example, Leadership Partners, Teaching Partners, Koorie Education Support Officers?

    The Statement of Expectation is only available to school-based employees who are located/employed in school locations, including:

    • teacher class
    • principal class
    • education support class
    • executive class principals employed in school-based roles.

    Positions that are employed from corporate locations, for example, area, regional, or central offices, including those who deliver support services in school locations, cannot undertake the Statement of Expectation. These employees include:

    • leading teacher or principal class staff who are regional employees (for example, Leadership Partner roles, Teaching Partner roles)
    • Koorie Education Support Officers (KESOs)
    • Student Support Services Officers (SSSOs)
    • Visiting Teachers
    • executive class principals employed in corporate locations.

    Question 3: When an employee decides to undertake the Statement of Expectation process, is eduPay used to record this decision and other information related to the process?

    The Statement of Expectation is discussion based and does not require the use of eduPay to record this decision, or any other information about an employee’s Statement of Expectation. Employees indicate to their reviewer if they will undertake the standard PDP process or the 2023 Statement of Expectation process at any time prior to 30 April 2023.

    Question 4: How does the Statement of Expectation differentiate between expected contributions by employees in different roles and settings?

    The Department acknowledges the breadth and diversity of school-based roles and the ways that employees contribute to the Statement of Expectation will vary depending on their role and setting. For example, employee contributions may vary depending on the stage of career or specific role of the individual, the type of school they are in, for example primary, secondary, special, or alternative setting, or location of the school.

    Employees and reviewers may draw on a range of resources to inform their understanding of what constitutes an appropriate contribution. These may include resources such as the employee’s role description and classification, Education Support Class dimensions of work, or whether they perform additional duties. Additionally, the Australian Professional Standards for Teachers and Principals may provide a valuable reference point for appropriate expectations for teacher class and principal class employees at different stages of their careers.

    Question 5: Are mid-cycle and end-of-cycle discussions required for employees who are undertaking the Statement of Expectation process?

    An end-of-cycle discussion is a requirement of the Statement of Expectation process. It provides employees an opportunity to reflect on, and be acknowledged for, their learning, growth, practice, and contribution to the Statement of Expectation with their reviewers. While not a requirement, employees and reviewers may continue to benefit from regular discussions.

    Question 6: How does an employee provide evidence of their successful contribution at the end of the Statement of Expectation process? Should the end-of-cycle discussion take a particular format?

    The Statement of Expectation process is discussion based. At the beginning of the cycle, employees discuss with their reviewers how their contributions accord with the Statement of Expectation. At the end of semester 2, employees will reflect on, and be acknowledged for, their learning, growth, practice, and contribution to the Statement of Expectation with their reviewers. The format of discussions may vary depending on the school’s approach.

    Question 7: Can a reviewer ask an employee to provide routine documentation as part of the Statement of Expectation process?

    The Statement of Expectation is a discussion-based process, therefore, employees cannot be asked to provide routine documentation

    If a reviewer has concerns that an employee is not making an appropriate contribution to the Statement of Expectation, refer to Question 12 for more information

    Question 8: Can reviewers ask teachers to present team research or projects to demonstrate their contribution to the Statement of Expectation?

    As the Statement of Expectation is discussion based, a teacher cannot be asked to provide any routine documentation as part of the process, including documentation of involvement in research or other projects. This does not prevent teachers from voluntarily providing documentation as evidence of their contribution.

    Question 9: If an education support class employee’s role and responsibilities do not cover both Statement of Expectation areas (Learning and Wellbeing), can they still successfully meet the Statement of Expectation?

    Yes. There is diversity and breadth in education support roles, and reviewers and education support class employees are encouraged to consider how they contribute to some, or all, of these areas as appropriate to their role and setting. Owing to this breadth and diversity, the application of the Statement of Education may focus on one or more aspects of the Statement of Expectation areas (Learning and/or Wellbeing), as determined by the employee.

    Question 10: What is the relationship between a school’s key improvement strategies and the Principal Class Statement of Expectation?

    The Principal Class Statement of Expectation is aligned with the Framework for Improving Student Outcomes, and the 2023 Priorities Goal Key Improvement Strategies, Learning and Wellbeing.

    Question 11: How do the School Strategic Plan (SSP) and Annual Implementation Plan (AIP) inform a teacher’s contribution to the Statement of Expectation?

    A school’s SSP and AIP should be developed and shared with its teachers and used by teachers to inform their contribution to the Statement of Expectation.

    Appropriate links between the SSP, the AIP, and a teacher’s Statement of Expectation ensures that each school aligns and acknowledges the efforts of all of its employees towards the shared goal of school improvement, and that each person understands their contribution, as appropriate to their role and setting, in working towards the 2023 Priorities Goal.

    Question 12: What is the process if a reviewer is concerned an employee is not making an appropriate contribution to the Statement of Expectation?

    Where there is a concern that an employee is not making an appropriate contribution to meet the Statement of Expectation, this concern should be raised with the employee in writing at the time the concern becomes apparent, and no later than 1 September 2023. This ensures the employee has a minimum of 3 months after being notified to demonstrate that they have made an appropriate contribution.

    When notifying the employee, the reviewer must identify the areas where they believe the employee is not making an appropriate contribution and provide support to enable improvement. The employee will be expected to provide evidence, which may be written or verbal, to demonstrate they have addressed the area(s) of concern.

    These processes are effective when employees are provided with meaningful feedback, so they can reflect and improve their practice and obtain support to improve and develop their skills. For feedback to be constructive and effective, it is important that it is actionable, supported by examples, and provides substantial opportunities for improvement.

    Question 13: How do principals sign off on the 2023 Statement of Expectation process?

    If an employee undertaking the alternative process in 2023 has successfully contributed to the Statement of Expectation, no action is required by the principal; eduPay calculates progression eligibility and applies this from 1 May.


2024 Statement of Expectation for Education Support Class Employees

2024 Statement of Expectation for Education Class Employees

Education Support class (ES) employees can again choose to undertake either the Statement of Expectation (SoE) or the standard Performance and Development Plan (PDP) process to meet performance and development requirements. Education Staff selecting the SoE process are not required to complete any routine documentation or monitoring in eduPay.

This year, the SoE is aligned to the Annual Implementation Plan (AIP) and the department’s values.

Statement of Expectation for ES employees

The expectation is that:

  • Education Support will contribute to the AIP as appropriate to their role and settings.
  • Education Support will act with integrity and in accordance with the ValuesExternal Link .

At the start of the cycle

ES employees indicate to their principal or delegate whether they will undertake the 2024 SoE or the standard PDP process, at any time prior to 30 April 2024.

ES employees discuss with their principal or delegate how they will contribute to the implementation of their school’s AIP together with their professional development / career goals and aspirations.

Throughout the year

ES employee and their principal or delegate meet regularly throughout the year.

Where there is a concern that an ES employee is not making an appropriate contribution to meet the SoE, this concern should be raised by the principal or delegate with the staff member in writing at the time the concern becomes apparent, and provided in writing along with proposed improvement supports.

At the end of the cycle

At the end of semester 2, ES employees, with their principal or delegate, will reflect on and be acknowledged for their learning, growth and contribution to the AIP.

It is assumed that ES employees who opt-in to this process will meet the SoE, in which case no action is required in eduPay.


Overview

Overview

Victoria is committed to the professional development of a high-quality school workforce. The Department of Education and Training plays a central role in building capability of schools to lead, manage and develop their own workforce, which is essential for improving outcomes for all students.

Education support employees contribute to the provision of a high-quality school environment for students by providing operational, professional or para-professional supports. These may include student and teacher supports, professional services, and administration, operational and technical supports.

The typical duties of education support employees, including school business managers, are categorised in six classification levels and remuneration ranges in accordance with the Dimensions of Work, as set out in the Victorian Government Schools Agreement (VSGA) 2017External Link .

School leaders have a professional responsibility to support performance and development by establishing a culture of effective job-embedded professional learning that is developmentally focused and supports improved practice and, ultimately, improved student outcomes.

These guidelines for education support employees build on best practices already in place for teachers and principals, which support the development of collaborative and mutually supportive school cultures where continuous improvements in knowledge, practice and engagement are the norm.

Effective performance and development practices involve:

  • regular feedback conversations
  • clear expectations of performance, including agreement on what success looks like and how it will be measured
  • a strong professional learning culture
  • appropriate development opportunities for all employees

These guidelines have been updated to provide further information and resources to better support the professional learning and development of school business managers. These include:

  • the School Business Manager Capability Framework, which more fully captures the broad range of skills of a school business manager, and example SMART Goals
  • supporting Performance and Development Plan (PDP) resources in the form of video case studies
  • updated information about school improvement planning processes

The performance and development approach

The performance and development approach

At the beginning of each performance and development cycle, education support employees, in consultation with their reviewer, will formulate goals for their PDP. The goals should capture the entirety of the employees’ role and responsibilities and align with the priorities articulated in the School Strategic Plan (SSP) and the Annual Implementation Plan (AIP) to ensure all employees are working toward a shared goal of school improvement.

Where appropriate, education support employees should also align their PDP to relevant professional standards. Koorie Engagement Support Officer PDPs are informed by relevant area of regional business plans.

The PDP of all education support employees must comprise of:

  • 4 performance and development goals
  • strategies that will be used to support the achievement of each goal
  • evidence that will be collected to demonstrate achievement of each goal

In addition, the PDP functions as a record of formal review conversations between education support employees and reviewers at mid-cycle and end-cycle points. Regular informal feedback should occur throughout the cycle for all employees and inform formal review conversations.

Concerns about performance should be raised as soon as they have been identified and discussed in the context of how the education support employee can work towards meeting their goals.

Figure 1: Links between the Performance and Development of staff with the school and system

Diagram showing Links between the Performance and Development of staff with the school and system. Described under 'View long description'
Figure 1: Links between the Performance and Development of staff with the school and system

The diagram shows the links between the Performance and Development of staff with the school and system. This is represented by a pyramid with 5 tiers. The headings of each tier from top to bottom are:

  • P&D
  • Annual Implementation Plan (AIP)
  • School Strategic Plan (SSP)
  • Framework for Improving School Outcomes (FISO)
  • Education State

There are 3 categories next to the pyramid with arrows relating to the different tiers. These categories and their related tiers are:

  • School based employees — P&D
  • School — AIP, SSP, FISO
  • System — Education State
Download Figure 1: Links between the Performance and Development of staff with the school and system

Domains of Education Support Practice

Domains of Education Support Practice

Education support employees must set 4 goals, comprising 1 for each of the 3 Domains of Education Support Practice, and one outcomes-focused goal about how education support employees are contributing to the school’s School Strategic Plan or Annual Implementation Plan (or relevant area or regional business plan). This approach acknowledges the holistic nature of education support employees’ practice.

The 3 Domains of Education Support Practice are:

  • Professional Knowledge — extending our understanding of (or learning new) processes, principles, and the core information that support our roles and tasks
  • Professional Practice — improving our work practices through feedback and reflection to support better school and student outcomes
  • Professional Engagement — working and learning with others in your team, school, and community to create improvements in practice and outcomes

In recognition of the strategic value school business managers provide to school leadership, specific capabilities have been developed to support business managers to be effective in their role. These specific capabilities align to each of the 3 Domains of Education Support Practice. These are:

Self-Mastery (Knowledge goals) — Ethics and values, problem-solving, flexibility, organising and planning, and resilience

Technical Skills (Practice goals) — Finance and procurement, governance and operational acumen, resource coordination, and risk management

People Skills (Engagement goals) — Stakeholder engagement, relationship building, supportive leadership, communicating and teamwork.

The Domains of Education Support Practice for Education Support and School Business Managers

Refer to 'View long description' for details
The Domains of Education Support Practice for Education Support and School Business Managers

Overview

This diagram is a representation of how the specific capabilities that have been developed to support business managers to be effective in their role align to each of the three Domains of Education Support Practice. It shows that knowledge goals align to self-mastery, practice goals align to technical skills and engagement goals align to people skills.

Presentation

On the left of the diagram is a circle with the words Practice, Knowledge and Engagement on the outside. These words are contained in arrows that point to each other. At the centre of the circle is the word Outcomes.

Next to the circle are two lists of words. Under the heading Education Support are the words Knowledge Goals, Practice Goals, Engagement Goals and Outcomes. In the second list under the heading Business Managers are the words Self-Mastery, Technical Skills, People Skills and Outcomes. There are arrows pointing from the words in the first list to the words in the second list.

Download The Domains of Education Support Practice for Education Support and School Business Managers

Business Manager Capability Framework

Business Manager Capability Framework

The capability of our business managers is key to supporting effective and successful school operations. Having a structured approach to capability development is therefore important to ensure professional development for all business managers is focused on those skills critical to their roles. The Business Manager Capability Framework (the Framework)External Link describes the capabilities required of business managers while acknowledging that the work of business managers varies across different school contexts.

The Framework covers three broad areas and identifies 15 specific capabilities considered essential for a school business manager to be effective in their role.

Technical Skills

  • Finance and Procurement: Implements effective, efficient and ethical financial management and budgeting processes.
  • Governance Acumen: Understands how to implement good governance. Applies governance framework to decision making and accountabilities.
  • Operational Acumen: Develops and implements plans and processes to facilitate effective and efficient operations, including simplifying complex practices.
  • Resource Coordination: Builds processes and organises people and activities. Sees opportunities for synergy and integration to get more effective outcomes out of fewer resources.
  • Risk Management: Systematically identifies, evaluates and prioritises potential risks. Communicates information to enable appropriate decisions and actions.

People Skills

  • Stakeholder Engagement: Builds and maintains effective relationships with stakeholders and focuses on understanding and meeting their needs.
  • Relationship Building: Builds and maintains effective relationships with stakeholders and focuses on understanding and meeting their needs.
  • Supportive Leadership: Proactively addresses issues and concerns in an empathetic and sensitive manner. Effectively shares ideas, thoughts and information to support outcomes.
  • Communicating with Others: Makes a positive impression and effectively negotiates with and influences others. Focuses clearly on finding cooperative solutions and outcomes.
  • Teamwork: Actively participates as a member of a team to support team goals, fostering collaboration and an environment of mutual trust and respect.

Self-Mastery

  • Ethics and Values: Models strong public-sector values and professional ethics. Adheres to these in all circumstances relevant to their role. Maintains confidentiality and supports others to do the right thing.
  • Problem Solving: Anticipates future needs and provides advice to assist in forward-planning. Solves problems using logical methods to reach effective solutions.
  • Flexibility: Adapts own approach to meet different situations.
  • Organising and Planning: Creates plans, forecasts and organises activities required to achieve a desired goal.
  • Resilience: Effectively deals with pressures and competing priorities. Maintains respectful working relationships while dealing with conflict and challenges.

Refer to the Resources tab for a downloadable version of the Framework, including elaborations of possible actions for each of the required capabilities.

Within schools, the Framework should be used to:

  • support ongoing professional learning and development of business managers
  • inform the design of a position description for the recruitment of a business manager with the essential skills and capabilities consistent with the Dimensions of Work — Education Support Class.

The Framework is supported by the following materials:

Business managers and their reviewers (principals) can access the Reflection Tool, Goal Strategies Guide and Professional Learning Suite on the Resources tab to:

  • reflect on and identify areas for capability development within the Framework as part of the performance and development process
  • plan and set performance and development goals
  • plan to undertake relevant professional learning.

Business Manager Professional Learning Suite

Business Manager Professional Learning Suite

The Business Manager Professional Learning Suite is a self-paced professional learning package that supports business managers to develop the essential skills and capabilities identified in the Business Manager Capability Framework (the Framework). The Framework supports business managers to be effective in their role and broaden their knowledge and application of the department's values, policies and procedures.

The Framework covers 3 broad areas:

  • Technical skills (finance and procurement, governance acumen, operational acumen, resource coordination, risk management)
  • People skills (stakeholder engagement, relationship building, supportive leadership, communicating with others, teamwork)
  • Self-mastery (ethics and values, problem solving, flexibility, organising and planning, resilience).

About the program

The program consists of ten self-paced guided handbooks that:

  • provide professional development to business managers focussing on the skills and capabilities in the Business Manager Capability Framework
  • can be accessed at no cost to participants or schools.

Access the program

All business managers are able to access the Professional Learning Suite (@education login required). Click on the handbook titles below and follow the password prompts to download each handbook.

What the program covers

Handbook 1: Develop and use emotional intelligenceExternal Link

  • What is emotional intelligence?
  • Identifying emotions
  • Managing your emotions
  • Relationship management and social skills

Handbook 2: Promote team innovationExternal Link

  • What is innovation?
  • Identifying and prioritising improvement
  • Innovation improvement and problem solving
  • Driving innovation by motivating

Handbook 3: Introduction to project managementExternal Link

  • Introducing project management and PRINCE2
  • Initiating a project using PRINCE2
  • Planning using PRINCE2
  • Managing the project using PRINCE2

Handbook 4: Introduction to risk managementExternal Link

  • Risk management
  • Risk analysis, evaluation and treatment
  • Communication, consultation, monitoring and review
  • Risk register

Handbook 5: Implement and monitor Occupational Health and Safety (OHS) policies, procedures and programsExternal Link

  • Overview of OHS
  • OHS regulations
  • Key OHS areas
  • Training and consultation

Handbook 6: Operating within the Department's compliance frameworkExternal Link

  • Overview of compliance frameworks
  • Areas of compliance
  • Privacy compliance in schools
  • Access and/or analyse information on changes in compliance

Handbook 7: Lead effective workplace relationsExternal Link

  • Communicating effectively
  • Legislative and organisational context
  • Building trust
  • Managing workplace conflict

Handbook 8: Support the recruitment, selection and induction of staffExternal Link

  • Legislative and organisational context
  • Recruitment
  • Selection process
  • Induction

Handbook 9: Report on Financial ActivityExternal Link

  • Introduction to financial reporting
  • Use conversion and consolidation procedures
  • Make, record and disclose asset and liability valuations
  • Identify and address discrepancies
  • Prepare statutory requirements reports
  • Provide financial business recommendations

Handbook 10: Coordinate school business resourcesExternal Link

  • Business resources and the procurement process
  • Procurement principles
  • Acquire and allocate resources
  • Monitor and report on resource allocation and usage

Support

If you require any further information or support regarding the Business Manager Professional Learning Suite please email school.leadership@education.vic.gov.au.


Alignment with the Framework for Improving Student Outcomes

Alignment with the Framework for Improving Student Outcomes

The Framework for Improving Student Outcomes (FISO) is an evidence-based framework that is designed to deliver continuous school and system improvement by supporting schools to focus their efforts on areas known to have the greatest impact on improving student outcomes. As the foundation for school strategic and annual planning, the FISO has strong links to the Department’s performance and development approach, as the learning needs of students articulated in the SSP and AIP informs the PDP goals of school employees which are monitored and appraised throughout the performance and development cycle.

Case Study: A focus on outcomes

Brett Coad, Business Manager, Kurnai College

Winner of the 2017 Outstanding School Business Manager as a part of the Victorian Excellence in Education AwardsExternal Link

Following his 2017 Outstanding Business Manager award as a part of the Victorian Excellence Awards, Brett wanted to maximise on how he could benefit his whole school community.

'Though the role of Business Manager is separate to the work happening in the classroom, we all have the same goal — to better our students and their outcomes. That’s why it was essential for me to use the grant wisely to support Kurnai College.'

Brett divided the grant from his award into two parts. The first involved engaging literacy expert Dr Carol Christensen to develop and implement the pilot of TR@K (Targeted Reading at Kurnai) — a literacy intervention program.

'It was incredible seeing results happen so quickly, students developing their literacy abilities that will support their learning and lives forever.'

Following the success of TR@K, Brett extended his sights on how he could help beyond his school gates to the wider South-Eastern region.

He decided to share his wealth of knowledge on systems and strategies that improve a school’s financial position — visiting 22 schools across his region. His efforts strengthened the collaborative culture of schools in the region.

'It has been personally and professionally rewarding to have the additional time to help support student outcomes at the local school level and engage with the wider education community.'


Performance and development cycle

Performance and development cycle

The performance and development cycle operates on a calendar year cycle, while salary progression for eligible employees will occur between May and April the following year.

At the start of the school year (Term 1), education support employees will meet with their reviewer to reflect and set goals for their performance and development. The Mid-Cycle Review will focus on practice and learning and will take place in Terms 2 and/or 3, while the End of Cycle Review will focus on feedback and review in Term 4.

Schools may opt out of the calendar year cycle by exception only. The principal must discuss this with the senior education improvement leader (SEIL), who will consider the individual circumstances of the school and seek approval from the regional director. Where approval is given the cycle will operate from 1 May to 30 April.

The Performance and Development Cycle

Refer to 'View long description' for details
The Performance and Development Cycle

Overview

This image details the Performance and Development Cycle as follows:

  1. Reflection and goal-setting
    • Reflect on practice
    • Develop performance and development goals
    • Identify evidence, strategies, school support and learning
    • Discuss and agree on performance and development plan (PDP) with reviewer
  2. Practice and learning
    • Reflect on practice
    • identify and reflect on multiple sources of evidence
    • Discuss progress with reviewer and receive personalised feedback and support
    • Reviewer to provide written feedback
    • Identify further opportunities for capacity building or learning
  3. Feedback and review
    • Reflect on practice
    • Formal discussion with reviewer to track progress
    • Evidence collected to be considered
    • Overall Performance and Development outcome to be determined and written feedback provided
    • Opportunities for development to be considered and will form part of PDP for next cycle

Presentation

At the centre of the image is a circle bordered by 3 arrows. One arrow, labelled Reflection and goal-setting, points to another arrow labelled Practice and learning which points to the last arrow labelled Feedback and review. This then points back to the first arrow. At the centre of the circle are the words Performance and Development Cycle.

Surrounding this circle are the stages of the Performance and Development Cycle as described under Overview.

Download The Performance and Development Cycle

Salary progression

Consistent with the VGSA 2017, salary progression is not automatic but is subject to a successful performance and development review. To achieve salary progression (where eligible), an education support employee must demonstrate they have achieved an overall outcome of ‘Meets Requirements’. Final outcome descriptors are provided in the End-cycle section.

Key dates and requirement for salary progression

  • Before 1 March — Notification requirement (in writing) for education support employees who may not achieve a successful Performance and Development outcome.
  • 1 May to 30 April — Education support employees with less than 6 months eligible service between this period at a particular salary range and subdivision will not be eligible for salary progression for that cycle.
  • 30 April — All eligible education support employees must be advised of their final salary progression outcome by this date.
  • 1 May — Salary progression occurs for eligible employees who achieve a successful performance and development outcome.

Identify opportunities for professional learning

Professional learning should have a demonstrable impact on an employee’s performance and development. For learning to be effective, it must be relevant, collaborative and future-focused. Together with the reviewer, education support employees should choose appropriate professional learning that is related to their PDP goals and developmental needs.

Responsibilities of the reviewer

The principal is ultimately responsible for the performance and development process for all employees. However, the principal may delegate the role of reviewer to an appropriate member of their leadership team or the broader staff (for instance, in larger schools). Reviewers should be members of staff who work with or have the capacity to observe education support employees in their practices and understand the nature of the education support employee role.

For some education support employees who work across several schools or are based in a network or region, the reviewer responsible for their performance and development may be a network chair, a manager or a coordinator based in the network or region, as determined by the relevant regional office. As above, the role of reviewer may be delegated to an appropriate person. Delegated reviewers will make recommendations about staff performance and development to the reviewer who is responsible for making a final decision in relation to each stage of the cycle.


Stage 1: Reflection and goal setting

Stage 1: Reflection and goal setting

Reflect on practice

When meeting with the reviewer at the beginning of the cycle, education support employees should come to the meeting having reflected on the previous year, including their strengths and areas for development, and what they hope to achieve in the coming year.

At the initial meeting the employee’s draft Performance and Development Plan (PDP), including the proposed goals, strategies and supporting evidence, will be discussed and refined, and clear expectations set for performance and development.

It is important that the education support employee and the reviewer both have a sound understanding of the employee’s position description and employment level and range requirements.

An agreement between the education support employee and reviewer should be reached about what will constitute success at the feedback and review stage. At the conclusion of this meeting, the PDP will be finalised and agreed on by the employee and reviewer.

Goal setting

Goal setting enables employees to focus on what they want to achieve, how they will go about it and what they need to support them. It ensures employees understand and agree to what is expected of them over the course of the performance and development cycle, and that they have input into decisions about how their performance and development will be appraised.

Goals should support employee growth and should be job-embedded, based on the projects, processes or strategies relevant to the employee’s role. Building on an understanding of their own role, education support employees should develop goals linked to the employee developmental needs and the school’s overarching priorities in discussion with their reviewer.

It is important that education support employees and the reviewer discuss what the achievement of a goal requires in the context of their role, and the employee’s stage of career. ‘Stretch goals’ should be developmental, based on areas or skills that are yet to be achieved (within the employee’s applicable dimensions of work), rather than those already consolidated.

When selecting goals, education support employees should consider:

  • relevant school and student data
  • the school’s School Strategic Plan and Annual Implementation Plan (or region or area-level plan)
  • the Domains of Education Support Practice
  • role description, classification level and range
  • any relevant industry standards
  • evidence and research about effective practice relevant to the employee’s role

Goals should follow the SMART goal methodology (Specific, Measurable, Achievable, Relevant and Time-Bound) and be evidence-based.

For school business managers, example SMART goals are provided against the School Business Manager Capability Framework. Refer to:

School Business Manager Capability Framework with sample SMART goalsExternal Link

Goal setting provides an opportunity for all education support employees to think about relevant development they can undertake to build on their knowledge and skills and enhance the contribution they make to the broader school community.

Identify strategies and evidence

Education support employees must document short-term strategies that will directly support them to achieve their performance and development goals over the course of the cycle. These may include capacity building, collaboration or professional learning.

Employees must also nominate appropriate evidence that will be used to demonstrate the achievement of their goals. Agreement between the employee and the reviewer should be reached about what will constitute success (and the evidence used to demonstrate this) at the end-cycle.

The evidence selected should be realistic and accessible, collected as part of everyday practice and should not be ‘extra’. Quality evidence should be selected that demonstrates progress toward the employee’s goals and the impact of their actions, not simply that they have acted.

Evidence of outcomes must be provided for each goal. When selecting evidence, employees should ask themselves:

  • how will I know I have achieved my goal and had the desired impact?
  • how could I demonstrate that I have achieved the goal?
  • who will benefit from me having done this?
  • can I ask those who benefit from my work for feedback?

Multiple sources of evidence can be used to demonstrate achievement of goals. In evaluating their performance and development, employees could consider any or all of the following evidence:

  • self-reflection: what did I do? how did it go? what could I do differently or better?
  • feedback from students, peers, supervisors or parents
  • participation and outcomes of team-based professional learning
  • participation and outcomes of collaborative planning activities, with other education support employees, teachers and school leaders
  • workplace artefacts (documents, emails, photos, etc) and assessments against relevant standards, processes or key performance indicators.

Goal agreement

Education support staff employees will discuss and agree on their performance and development goals with their reviewer. Goals can be regularly reviewed and adjusted, as required.

Following goal agreement, employees must then enter their goals, strategies and agreed sources of evidence in the PDP section of eduPay. Reviewers must then review, provide feedback and endorse the PDP on eduPay by 30 April.


Stage 2: Mid-cycle practice and learning

Stage 2: Mid-cycle practice and learning

A formal mid-cycle review discussion must be scheduled between the education support employee and the reviewer to discuss progress against the PDP goals.

The primary purpose of the mid-cycle discussion is to provide an opportunity for the employee to receive feedback, identify areas for improvement, and request support to ensure the goals will be achieved by the end cycle.

The mid-cycle discussion also enables both education support employees and the reviewer to refine the goals and evidence in the PDP, and identify relevant professional learning and development opportunities. Any changes are to be agreed by the employee and the reviewer.

Concerns about performance should be raised as soon as they have been identified and discussed in the context of how the education support employee can work towards meeting their goals.

Reflect on practice

Education support employees should monitor progress against their goals and collect evidence of their practice throughout the performance and development cycle in preparation for mid-cycle and end-cycle discussions.

Ongoing analysis and discussion about practice with colleagues is encouraged. Employees should regularly reflect on and evaluate their practice and how it benefits the school, and undertake a self-review against their goals to prepare for performance discussions.

Feedback

Performance and development processes are most effective when they provide employees with constructive feedback to ensure they are informed about what they need to know and can do to improve their practice. Effective feedback is timely and actionable, supported by examples and provide opportunities for improvement.

Learning and collaboration to support the achievement of the PDP goals should be an expectation for all employees. Education support employees and the reviewer can discuss opportunities for professional development appropriate to their school’s context at any stage of the performance and development cycle.

There should be systems in place for education support employees to receive regular formal and informal feedback from a range of sources, including the principal, school leadership team, teachers, students, parents or carers, peers and through self-reflection.

Effective feedback should encourage and support employees to consider:

  • where am I going?
  • how am I going?
  • where to next?

When providing feedback, reviewers should support employees to become self-regulators and evaluators of their own practice. Feedback should aim to motivate, empower and support employees to identify where their practice could be more effective and the adjustments required. Employees should enter feedback sessions with an open mind, and be willing and receptive to constructive feedback.

At the mid-cycle review discussion, an education support employee should be able to articulate the ways in which they are applying their learning to their role. Employees must enter their progress towards the goals in the PDP section of eduPay. Reviewers must then review, provide feedback and endorse the PDP on eduPay by 31 July.


Stage 3: End-cycle feedback and review

Stage 3: End-cycle feedback and review

A formal end-cycle performance and development review will be undertaken annually, focused on evidence relating to achievement of the education support employee’s PDP goals. Improvement of practice and its impact within the school, network or region will be recognised as part of the review process.

Reflect on practice

The end-cycle formal review will comprise a meeting where the education support employee and reviewer reflect on the evidence collected by the employee throughout the year, discuss the goals outlined in the employee’s PDP, recognise their achievements, and identify areas for further development.

Education support employees should prepare for the formal end-cycle review discussion by:

  • collating and analysing evidence collected over the course of the performance and development cycle
  • reflecting on their performance and growth over the cycle, with reference to the PDP goals
  • documenting their achievements, how they have grown and areas for future further development
  • planning for a constructive, professional conversation with the reviewer and receiving feedback regarding their progress and growth in all areas of their practice

Formal review

Reviewers should make informed, professional judgements about employee practice and improvement using multiple sources of evidence, and considering the circumstances surrounding an employee’s growth throughout the cycle. Data should not be considered in isolation, and no single piece of evidence should determine the outcome of the review.

Reviewers are responsible for determining the overall performance and development outcome for the employee, which must be recorded, and both verbal and written feedback should be provided. Final reviews must be completed by the end of Term 4, and all eligible education support employees must be advised of their final salary progression outcome no late than 30 April.

Final outcome

The final review stage also focuses on specific areas for the employee’s improvement which will inform the PDP for the next performance and development cycle. In this way it marks the formal close of one cycle and serves as the foundation for the next by providing employees with precise feedback on where they can continue to learn and grow.

To provide meaningful, detailed and actionable feedback to employees, reviewers are required to:

  • determine performance and development outcomes for each goal (Meets Requirement, Partially Meets Requirement or Does Not Meet Requirement)
  • provide feedback explaining each outcome
  • provide guidance for further development

Feedback from reviewers should:

  • recognise and celebrate achievement and professional growth
  • identify new or renewed areas for focus in the next performance and development cycle
  • identify strategies and supports to facilitate growth in these areas for the future

Finally, the reviewer will then exercise their professional judgement to determine a final assessment outcome. The table below provides a description of the final outcomes that can be provided.

Employees must enter their progress towards the goals in the PDP section of eduPay. Reviewers must then review, provide the overall outcome and endorse the PDP on eduPay.

Descriptor/definition

Meets Requirements — The performance of the employee has been evaluated as meeting the requirements of effective performance, professional growth and improvement of practice at this stage of career development.

Does Not Meet Requirements — The performance of the employee has been evaluated as not meeting the requirements of effective performance and/or not meeting the expectations for professional growth and improvement of practice at this stage of career development.


Resources

Resources

PDP Resources

PDP tools

Business Managers Capability Framework and resources

Support for small schools

The School Administration Support Hub (SASH)External Link (staff login required) is a centralised support service for small schools with up to 200 students enrolled. SASH provides support with financial and payroll administration processes to reduce administrative workload for small school principals.

Department contacts

School Workforce Performance and Development

School.Leadership@education.vic.gov.au

Human Resources

Employee.Relations@education.vic.gov.au

eduPay Support

Payrollservices@education.vic.gov.au
Phone: 1800 641 943
eduPay and eduPay Help

Professional Development and Learning Communities

Victorian Academy of Teaching and LeadershipExternal Link

Business Managers VictoriaExternal Link

Merit Protection Board

Merit Protection BoardExternal Link
meritboards@education.vic.gov.au


Reviewed 18 March 2020