education.vic.gov.au

Appendices

A. Pre-review self-evaluation supporting tools and resources

B. Reviewer resources – suggested fieldwork questions

Record answers to the following suggested fieldwork questions and their proficiency levels (emerging, evolving, evolving, embedding).

Student voice

  • Tell us what student voice looks like in your classroom. (Teacher)
  • What process do you use to get student feedback on a lesson or unit? (Teacher)
  • Tell us how you contribute to making decisions about what and how you learn. (Student)
  • How is your work assessed?
  • How do you assess how you are going?
  • How does your teacher assess how you are going?
  • Do you know exactly why you got an A+ on a piece of work? (Student)
  • How do your assessments help you with your learning? (Student)
  • Do you believe that your ideas and thoughts about your learning are valued by your teachers? How do you know? (Student)
  • Do you have regular opportunities to discuss your progress with teachers? How does this happen? (Student)
  • Do you think there has been a decision made in the school recently that was greatly influenced by student views and opinions? What was it and how did this happen? (Student)
  • Are there some things that happen in the school that students can’t have input into? (Student)

Student agency

  • In terms of student agency, what can we expect to see in this classroom? (Teacher)
  • What are you working on at the moment? Do all the students in your class do the same work? How do you know what work you should be doing? How do you know you are learning? What does this look like? How do you know that you have been improving/successful?
  • How do you know you are good at your work?
  • If you’re stuck what do you do? (Student)
  • Has your learning in this class been easy, hard or just right? (Student)
  • Can you give an example of when you felt you worked in a real partnership with one of your teachers? It could be about your learning or things that interest you. (Student)
  • How do you work with your teachers to reflect on and improve teaching and learning? Does this happen across the whole school?
  • Do you give feedback to teachers as a way of making teaching better? (Student)
  • Do you work with your teacher to set your learning goals? How does that happen? (Student)
  • How do you know that you are achieving your learning goals? How do you know you have been successful? (Student)
  • What choices do you get to make about what you want to learn? Do you get to choose your own projects? (Student)

Student leadership

  • Tell us what student leadership looks like in your classroom. How are student leaders selected? (Teacher)
  • What student leadership bodies (e.g. SRC) exist in the school and what role do they have? (Teacher)
  • Do you think student leadership opportunities are limited to certain types of students? Can everyone become a leader if they want? How does this happen? (Student)
  • In what ways do student leaders help/ represent students who are not confident or do not have the opportunity to speak up? (Student)
  • How do student leaders learn about good leadership? (Student & Teacher)

Curriculum content

  • Can you describe how you use the school’s curriculum plan and/or instructional model to support your teaching practice? (Teacher)
  • How do you scaffold and differentiate learning to enable your students to achieve their learning goals? (Teacher)
  • Can you give an example of how you have collaboratively designed and implemented a curriculum plan or scope and sequence of learning with your colleagues? (Teacher)
  • Can you tell us how you design authentic, fit for purpose assessments that reflect the learning program and objectives? (Teacher)
  • Can you give some examples of how you provide regular feedback to students on their progress against individual learning goals and curriculum standards?
  • How do your assessments help you with your learning? (Student and Teacher)
  • How do you know what work you should be doing? Do all the students in your class do the same work? How do you know you are learning? What does this look like? How do you know that you have been improving/ successful? If you’re stuck what do you do? (Student)
  • Tell us about your opportunities to discuss your progress with teachers? How does this happen? Does it happen often? (Student)

Teacher practice

  • How would you describe the adult learning culture in this school? (Teacher)
  • Can you give an example of how you have collaboratively designed and implemented a curriculum plan or scope and sequence of learning with your colleagues? (Teacher)
  • Can you give any examples of the current research you draw upon, and explain how you use an inquiry improvement cycle to improve your practice? (Teacher)
  • Tell us about the professional learning you have undertaken in the last year? How was this determined? (Teacher)
  • Give us an example of how you and your colleagues use student data (Teacher)
  • Can you give an example of how you analyse multiple sources of data to evaluate the impact of your teaching on students’ learning? (Teacher)
  • When working with colleagues, how do you challenge and support each other to improve practice? (Teacher)
  • How does your teacher make learning interesting and challenging for you? (Student)
  • Can you give an example that shows how your teacher helps you connect your learning to the real world? (Student)

C. The Continua of Practice for School Improvement

The Continua of Practice for School ImprovementExternal Link (the Continua) is designed to assist principals and teachers to identify areas of practice that require attention in order to deliver improved student outcomes.

The Continua assists principals and teachers to:

  • use evidence and observations to self-assess their current practice
  • locate their performance on an improvement-focused continuum
  • understand what improved practice looks like
  • develop a shared language for describing educational practice
  • engage in conversations about improving professional practice

Each continuum describes a range of practices across four proficiency levels (Emerging, Evolving, Embedding, Excelling).

Relationship of the Continua of Practice to the Framework for Improving Student Outcomes (FISO) Improvement Model

Identifying current levels of proficiency and identifying the practices and behaviours of the next level, allows schools to strategically plan for improving student outcomes. Being able to see progress along a continuum also helps to support change in teaching practice by articulating both the subtle and more significant differences required to achieve genuine change.

The FISO Improvement Model provides a common language for school improvement across the Victorian government school system. It is structured around four statewide priorities that are proven to have a strong bearing on the effectiveness of a school. The model then goes on to describe sixteen domains.

The Continua of Practice is integral to school self-evaluation at both the six-month and twelve-month stages when monitoring the Annual Implementation Plan (AIP). Then, through a deeper dive, the Continua are vital to the pre-review self-evaluation, the quadrennial school review and the identification and selection of initiatives that align with the goals, targets and key improvement strategies (KIS) for the next School Strategic Plan.

There are areas of overlap between the FISO dimensions and the evidence base behind them – this is common to the nature of school improvement, and this overlap is also apparent in the Continua. Schools can engage intensively with the Continua relevant to their particular area/s of focus for each year. They can also use the other Continua to understand their practices more broadly, track status and progress, and avoid a decline in performance across the set of dimensions that schools consider when planning and monitoring improvement.

D. School performance data

School leaders can access information on their school’s performance from two sources:

  1. the School Performance Reports websiteExternal Link and
  2. the School Information PortalExternal Link

These websites are a central access point for school data and are available to the principal class and authorised regional and central staff only.

The School Performance Reports websiteExternal Link contains reports that will be used during the pre-review self-evaluation, and must be provided to the School Review Panel as part of the validation of the school’s pre-review self-evaluation (PRSE). The reports required are:

  • Parent opinion survey report
  • Student attitudes to school survey (AtoSS) report
  • Panorama supplementary school level report
  • The School Performance report – from 2017 onwards

The School Information PortalExternal Link contains data sets on information provided in the reports above. It also includes additional information that can also be referred to when developing the school’s PRSE. These include:

  • the school's enrolment and projection figures
  • the school summary report and school profile
  • Student Family Occupation (SFO)
  • Victorian Curriculum F-10
  • Attendance, school staff survey results and other data sets

More information

Differentiated school performance groups

The differentiated school performance groups introduced a new performance reporting approach to complement the new school review. It is also a differentiated approach to school support.

This method to generate the School Performance Groups replaces the previous school improvement measures and associated school threshold reports.

The Differentiated School Performance Groups measure a school’s level of achievement as well as its trajectory over time – whether it is improving, in static or declining. The outcome provides a picture of performance that is ‘differentiated’ for every school.

Domain and measurement group data assists schools to recognise strengths and identify areas for focused continuous improvement effort. At the school level, performance levels in each of the six domains assists schools to prepare for strategic and annual planning, and for school review. Domain and measurement group data assists schools to recognise strengths and specify areas for focused continuous improvement effort.

The six domains and associated measures form the basis of the school performance groups. The measures and domains align to the FISO and Education State school targets.

The overall performance group is one of the factors that informs how many days will be allocated for the review. The schools overall performance group and specific data can be found on the School Performance Reports websiteExternal Link .

Other useful information can be found here:

Differentiated school performance groups

Differentiated School performance groups
Differentiated school performance groups

Recharge

Schools with strong but declining performance where recharging efforts will lead to improvement

Each of the following elements is in a continuous circle

Renew

Performance is static over time (including some cases where moderate but on a declining trajectory) and requires renewed effort to be high performing

Influence

Performance is high or very high.

This level of performance is maintained consistently over three years or is on a positive improvment trajectory with the school acting as an influence and system leader

Stretch

Performance is improving from a moderate or low base. These schools could be high performing if they stretch and continue to improve

Transform

Performance is low. This low level of performance is maintained consistently over time or is on a declining trajectory and transformation is required to improve

Download Differentiated school performance groups

Domains and measures

Domains and measures
Domains and measures

Measures that add up to Domains

Achievement in top two bands of Naplan + Lifting low performers NAPLAN meausres + Positive change in NAPLAN results (gain) = Achievement (Reading and Numeracy)

Collective efficacy (percentage of positive survey responses) + Academic emphasis (percentage of positive survey responses) + Instructional leadership (percentage of positive survey responses) = School climate

Stimulating learning (percentage of positive survey responses) + Learning confidence (percentage of positive survey responses) + Student safety (percentage of positive survey responses) = Attitudes to school

Primary to secondary (percentage of positive transitions) + Attendance = Engagement

Mean VCE English score + Senior secondary completions = Senior secondary

NAPLAN particiaption + Attitudes to school (responses to ATOSS) + School climate (survey responses) = Participation

Download Domains and measures

The Differentiated School Performance Groups allocates schools to five different performance groups. These groups have the below characteristics

Influence

Performance is high or very high. This level of performance is maintained consistently over three years or is on a positive improvement trajectory with the school acting as an influencer and system leader.

Stretch

Performance is high or very high. This level of performance is maintained consistently over three years or is on a positive improvement trajectory with the school acting as an influencer and system leader.

Renew

Performance is static over time (including some cases where performance is moderate but on a declining trajectory) and requires renewed effort to be high performing.

Recharge

Schools with strong but declining performance where recharging efforts will lead to improvement.

Transform

Performance is low. This low level of performance is maintained consistently over time or is on a declining trajectory and transformation is required to improve.

Not grouped

There is insufficient data for statistically valid measures (for example, some small schools). Schools will still receive a performance group against domains/measures for which sufficient data is available.

References

  1. Hargreaves, David H. 2012. A self-improving school system: Towards maturity. Wolfson College, Cambridge.External Link
  2. Bryk, AS. et al. 2010, Organising schools for improvement: Lessons from Chicago, University of Chicago Press, p.17.External Link
  3. Gallagher, MJ. (Advisor to the Department of Education and Training), May 2017, A report on the implementation of the Education State Victoria, Department of Education and Training, Victoria.
  4. Gallagher, MJ. (Advisor to the Department of Education and Training), May 2017, A report on the implementation of the Education State Victoria, Department of Education and Training, Victoria.
  5. City, EA., Elmore, RF. & Fiarman SE. 2009, Instructional rounds in education: A network approach to improving teaching and learning, Harvard Education Publishing Group (HEPG).External Link
  6. Gallagher, MJ. (Advisor to the Department of Education and Training), May 2017, A report on the implementation of the Education State Victoria, Department of Education and Training, Victoria.
  7. Barber, M. in Fullan, M. & Sharratt, L. 2012. Putting FACES on the data: What great leaders do! Ontario Principals’ Council and Learning Forward, Corwin Press, p. xi.External Link
  8. Shaddock, A. 2014, Using data to improve learning: A practical guide for busy teachers, Australian Council for Educational Research (ACER) PressExternal Link .
  9. Gallagher, MJ. (Advisor to the Department of Education and Training), May 2017, A report on the implementation of the Education State Victoria, Department of Education and Training, Victoria.
  10. Hargreaves, A. and O’Connor, T. 2017. Collaborative Professionalism, WISE Research Series: 2017 #12: https:// www.wise-qatar.org/2017-wise-research-collaborative- professionalismExternal Link
  11. O’Rourke, M. and Addison, P. 2017, Literature review for development of a Victorian student agency and leadership framework, Department of Education and Training, Victoria, p.6.
  12. Masters, G. 2016, ‘Schools as learning organisations’. Teacher Magazine, Australian Council for Educational Research (ACER)External Link .
  13. Hattie, J. 2005, What is the nature of evidence that makes a difference to learning? Australian Council for Educational Research (ACER)External Link
  14. Ontario Ministry of Education 2010, ‘Leading the Instructional Core: An interview with Richard Elmore’, In Conversation, 11(3) (pdf)External Link .
  15. Chapman, C. and Sammons, P. 2013, School self- evaluation for school improvement: what works and why? CfBT Education Trust.External Link
  16. Ainley, J. and Gebhardt, E. 2013, Measure for measure: a review of outcomes of school education in Australia, Australian Council for Educational Research (ACER)External Link .
  17. MacBeath, J. 2010, ‘Self-Evaluation for School Improvement’ in Hargreaves, A., Hopkins, D., Lieberman, A. and Fullan, M. (eds.), Second International Handbook of Educational Change, Springer International Handbooks of Education, vol. 23External Link a>, pp.901-12.
  18. Gallagher, MJ. (Advisor to the Department of Education and Training) May 2017, A report on the implementation of the Education State Victoria, Department of Education and Training, Victoria.
  19. Fullan, M. 2014, The principal: Three keys to maximising impact, Jossey BassExternal Link .
  20. O’Rourke, M. and Addison, P. 2017, Literature review for development of a Victorian student agency and leadership framework, Department of Education and Training, Victoria, p.6.
  21. Gallagher, MJ. (Advisor to the Department of Education and Training), May 2017, A report on the implementation of the Education State Victoria, Department of Education and Training, Victoria.
  22. Fielding, M. 2007, Jean Rudduck (1937-2007), ‘Carving a new order of experience’: A preliminary appreciation of the work of Jean Rudduck in the field of student voice, Education Action Research, 15(3), pp. 323–336External Link .
Guidance chapter containing resources and tools to support the school review process

Reviewed 16 May 2022

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